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I'll be travelling to Moscow and Saint Petersburg in July. While searching homes, I noticed that most homes do not have air conditioning. How livable is it in these cities without A/C?

closed as primarily opinion-based by Neusser, ThisIsMyName, Giorgio, Newton, CGCampbell May 9 '18 at 18:02

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    people live.... – Neusser May 8 '18 at 12:58
  • But you won't notice homes without central heating! – alamar May 8 '18 at 14:43
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People used to live in the tropics and subtropics without air conditioning - and indeed, many still do - so it's livable. It's all about what you can tolerate.

Also, where you normally live is going to affect the answer. From Miami or Bangkok? A hot day in St. Petersburg is going to seem fine. From Tuktoyaktuk? Maybe it will be pretty intolerable.

St. Petersburg's record high temperature - of all time - is only 37.1 degrees (98.8 F) and Moscow's, 38.2 degrees (100.8 F). Moscow's normal July high - the hottest month - is 24.3 (75.7) and St. Petersburg's, 23.0 (73.4) - so in normal weather, air conditioning will not be required. During a heat wave, yes, you'll probably want it but you'll probably find such times are brief and reasonably uncommon. (All these statistics are from Wikipedia's climate section of the respective city pages.)

If you find that you can't tolerate such temperatures, travel during the shoulder season. By early September (which is still summertime, astronomically), daytime highs have cooled to an average of the mid-teens (high 50s/low 60s F) and the heat waves should be much rarer indeed.

  • I imagine that 2010 heat wave actually bumped 38.2 record high to early 40s. Still, if there's no heat wave, one should be fine. – alamar May 8 '18 at 13:31
  • @alamar No, that includes 2010. One station in Moscow reported 39.0 on the day that Moscow Domodedovo hit 38.2, the record indicated above. – Jim MacKenzie May 8 '18 at 14:34
  • Don't forget that the temperatures doesn't fall much during 'night'. This makes them especially hard to cope with. – Rg7x gW6a cQ3g May 9 '18 at 9:07
  • @9ilsdx9rvj0lo it drops about 10 degrees at night (18F) - average July low 14.4 (57.9 F). In a heat wave it may only drop to the low 20s, and might be sticky for a few days, but these periods should be brief and rare. If unacceptable to a visitor, I suggest May or September. – Jim MacKenzie May 9 '18 at 15:35

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