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According to the UK Home Office:

Regulation 11(4) states that when an EEA national does not produce on arrival a valid ID card or passport he should be given “every reasonable opportunity” to prove by other means that he is an EEA national. In other words a person claiming to be an EEA national should not automatically be refused admission as a result of being unable to produce a valid ID card or passport.

In practice, what documents can be used?

I am a citizen of an EU country (recently naturalised), but do not yet possess a passport or ID card of that country due to exorbitant processing times.

If I were to show up at the UK border via the crossing from France with my certificate of citizenship (stating my full name & date of birth), and a foreign passport (verifying my name & DOB), would this constitute sufficient evidence? Would they merely call the embassy to confirm, or in practice would I be denied entry?

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If I were to show up at the UK border via the crossing from France with my certificate of citizenship (stating my full name & date of birth), and a foreign passport (verifying my name & DOB), would this constitute sufficient evidence?

If you make it plausible that you're an EU citizen, they must let you in. In fact, as soon as you claim EU citizenship, they have to consider your case. That said, you could be delayed while they examine you further.

So yes, your foreign pasport and your citizenship certificate will be enough, as combined, they prove your identity and nationality.

Your passport should not be stamped, but in practice it may happen anyway

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