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According to the The Consulate General of the Republic of Serbia in Shanghai >> Travel to Serbia,

Holders of Taiwanese passports are issued visitor’s permit for entry into the Republic of Serbia.

I'm confused about the difference between a visitor's permit and a visa. What is the difference between them?

Does a visitor's permit mean that Taiwanese citizens don't need to apply for a visa, but will be issued a visitor's permit on arrival in Serbia?

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The information provided by the Shanghai consulate, on the link you give, is somewhat vague as to whether this "permit" is provided in advance or on arrival. It turns out (see below) that you need to apply in advance. I would advise that you contact them (or the appropriate consulate for where you currently live) to clarify the exact procedures required to apply for the visitors' permit at that particular consulate.

The Serbian embassy in Tokyo provides more information:

HOLDERS OF TAIWANESE PASSPORTS

Holders of Taiwanese passports do not need visa to enter Republic of Serbia but prior to travel have to acquire Certificate issued by the Embassy of the Republic of Serbia which certifies that the border authorities of the Republic of Serbia will allow holder of Taiwanese passport to enter Republic of Serbia at the border crossing/airport.

I guess the only difference between a visitors' permit and a visa is that the permit is issued when Serbia does not have diplomatic relations with the country of which the applicant is a citizen.

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    Probably stronger than lack of diplomatic relations, as the USA currently does not have diplomatic relations with Iran, but (sometimes) issues visas to Iranian nationals. Perhaps the Serbian government wants to emphasize its non-recognition of the Taiwan government entirely, for benefit of relations with Beijing. – Andrew Lazarus Mar 21 '18 at 19:07
  • Quite possibly. I wasn't suggesting that such a distinction would have any meaning outside Serbia, however, since such terms are defined on the whim of national authorities (hence the nonsensical term of visa-on-arrival in some countries). – Wandering Chemist Mar 21 '18 at 19:49

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