9

I applied a few weeks ago for a Canadian eTA as I am planning to travel in a few months and wanted to have it before buying the plane tickets. I was granted the eTA on the spot.

When applying, I have specified my only citizenship at the time and left the 'additional citizenships' box blank. In the meantime, I obtained a second citizenship though naturalisation. The application form mentions I should apply for a new eTA if I change the passport I plan to travel with, but I don't mind using the passport associated with my first citizenship.

Should I get a new eTA anyway?

  • 1
    I suppose there's no need, but I can't find any information on the CBSA site to support that. I did see a link where you can ask them directly if their prepackaged answers don't address your question; start at cic.gc.ca/english/visit/eta-form-help.asp. If you find a definitive answer, please come back and answer your own question. – phoog Mar 11 '18 at 23:36
5

I can confirm I was able to travel with my first passport, the one associated with my initial citizenship, and the original eTA, without having to reapply to declare getting an additional citizenship.

-3

Like with many other similar questions the answer is an unequivocal no. As long as you've been completely truthful at the time of the application, there's never an obligation to inform the immigration authorities about material changes in your citizenships, jobs, marital status, residence address, and a myriad of other factors that may change between the time you apply for a visa and the time you travel to the country in question. Of course, Canadian immigration officers are free to ask you whatever additional questions they see fit at the border and that's where you might have to disclose your second passport. But as far as the original ETA application goes you're 100% in the clear.

Enjoy your stay in Canada.

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    This might be true for Canada, but it isn't universally true. For instance, with the US's ESTA, you are required to reapply if you change your citizenship, name, gender, or if the answers to any of the "eligibility" questions change. See help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/1073/~/…. So maybe it would be good to have an official source confirming your answer here. – Nate Eldredge Mar 12 '18 at 3:32
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    @NateEldredge "If you obtain a new passport or change your name, gender or country of citizenship, you will be required to apply for a new travel authorization." - this all pertains to the passport used to apply for ESTA, not to any other passports. If you change your gender your current passport will usually become invalid and as a logical consequence you need a fresh ESTA. What citizenships you obtain in the background is irrelevant. – JonathanReez Supports Monica Mar 12 '18 at 3:44
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    While I agree that the answer to this question is indeed probably "no," the statement "there's never an obligation to inform the immigration authorities about material changes in your citizenships, jobs, marital status, residence address, and [myriad] other factors that may change between the time you apply for a visa and the time you travel to the country in question" is seriously overbroad. – phoog Mar 12 '18 at 3:47
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    The eTA isn't a visa; it's a different animal. – Jim MacKenzie Mar 12 '18 at 18:00
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    @JimMacKenzie it is a visa for all intents and purposes, except that Canada chooses not to call it so to avoid breaking visa-free agreements. Australia and the US run a similar charade. Technically speaking you don't need it when entering overland, but what percentage of non-US citizens enter Canada through the US land border? – JonathanReez Supports Monica Mar 12 '18 at 18:32

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