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Is there any means for airlines to access a person's flight itinerary?

For instance:

  • Can airline "A" access all of John's flights in the past and in any flight he has booked in the future with Airlines "B".

  • Would this change if Airlines "B" and Airlines "A" have a partnership/codeshare agreement?

Addendum:

I have an interview with Airline "A" located in their home hub in Europe, which is about a 25-hour flight to get there from NZ. I got the invitation Sunday night, to come by not the next day, but the Monday after. It's impossible for me to request a leave on such short notice. Also tickets are hard and expensive to find due to multiple connections.

I was contemplating on saying that I'm on an overseas business trip currently, and I'll be coming back on XX/03/2018 and we can do the interview then.

Addendum for "put on hold as unclear what you're asking by George Y., Ali Awan, Giorgio, Rory Alsop, CGCampbell ":

It's a simple question:

Can an airline look at an individuals past present and future itinerary by it's own means?

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    Could you elaborate? What's the concern about this? Might shed some light on an answer
    – Mark Mayo
    Feb 12 '18 at 1:46
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    Do you have a particular reason to believe that such a lie, even if they believe it, would make them more willing to postpone the interview than telling them the truth would? It's not as if the truth in your case sounds like one that would be particularly damning from an employer's point of view. Feb 12 '18 at 2:34
  • @HenningMakholm that doesn't answer my question.
    – 3kstc
    Feb 12 '18 at 3:04
  • @George Y. As a moderator why would you delete our messages?
    – 3kstc
    Feb 13 '18 at 23:29
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I got the invite Sunday night, to come by not the next day, but the Monday after. It's impossible for me to request leave on such short notice, let alone how hard/expensive tickets are to find due to multiple connections. I was contemplating on saying that I'm on a overseas business trip currently, and I'll be coming back on XX/03/2018 we can do the interview then.

You can say whatever you want, the airline has no reason to doubt you - plus the cost of digging up your history is too high compared to the reward - that is, catching you in a lie.

You can simply say, "I am unavailable to travel on those days and am available on XX/03/2018". You don't have to tell them why. They probably won't even ask why, as it is reasonable to expect someone would have prior engagements.

It seems to me any legitimate employer can appreciate that travel would be a burden.

Finally, are you sure this is a legitimate business offer? Normally if you are asked to visit an employer for an interview over such a distance, the employer bears the costs of the flight.


Yes, airlines have access to a passenger's future and previous travel history - but only as far as that airline is concerned.

Airline A, only knows about your history on Airline A. They do not know of any future flights you have booked on Airline B, or your previous history with Airline B.

Even if Airline A and Airline B are on a code-share agreement, data shared between airlines is only for that specific flight and not historic.

Just to close off the topic, if the airlines are part of an interline agreement, such as OneWorld, only your status is shared between the member airlines, not your history.

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    "Normally if you are asked to visit an employer for an interview over such a distance, the employer bears the costs of the flight." - Particularly when the employer is an airline. Even if they don't fly suitable routes, they are quite likely to be able to get tickets more cheaply than a potential employee. I would be very suspicious. Feb 12 '18 at 6:36
  • @MartinBonner Should I ask for tickets?
    – 3kstc
    Feb 12 '18 at 9:17
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    @3kstc I think you should be asking if they will arrange the travel and accommodation. If not, I also think you should consider very carefully if this could be some sort of scam. Did they contact you originally? Is the domain name of their email address the same (not "similar", but "the same") as the airline website? Do you already have contacts who work for them who could check you have been talking to a real person in HR? Feb 12 '18 at 10:07
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    do they realize you don’t life there local? in Europe it is common (if not mandatory) that they reimburse the travel.
    – Aganju
    Feb 12 '18 at 11:53
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    @MartinBonner It is normal for airlines to not reimburse for entry-level positions/interviews. It's a supply and demand thing, you hear they have thousands of applicants for tens of slots. The asker appears to be applying for a pilot cadetship, which is certainly one with large numbers of applicants. If it was something like an IT position, then things are different.
    – user71659
    Feb 14 '18 at 2:12

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