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I will be visiting Norway during August and September. My question is: Is wild camping allowed in Norway? What are the rules, besides the obvious "take your litter with you when you leave"? Can I camp on pre-owned land?

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Norway has a very extensive right-to-roam called allemannsrett. From the website of the Norwegian Environment Agency:

In open country in the lowlands, you can pitch a tent and camp overnight for up to 48 hours in one location without prior permission from the landowner. In the mountains, and in remote, sparsely populated areas, you may camp for longer than 48 hours.

So you are allowed to camp, even on private land. It goes into some more details on where you are allowed to set up camp:

Unless local bylaws provide otherwise, you must never pitch your tent within 150 metres (500 feet) of an inhabited house or cabin. Always take care not to damage young trees. Remember, you must not camp on fenced land without the landowner’s permission.

Those are the basic rules, but there is more specific advice on the website to things such as building a bonfire (not in or near woodland) and also on other rights the right-to-roam gives you, such as picking berries and mushroom.

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    There is in Norway no general rule against accessing or camping on fenced land. In forests and in the mountains, you will very often find fenced areas, but the fences are there to control cattle and sheep, not to prevent persons to access the areas. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Jan 29 '18 at 11:02
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    Out of curiosity; are you allowed to stay where you are (on privately owned land) even if the owner wants you to leave? – Yates Jan 29 '18 at 13:02
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    @ThomasYates As far as I know, as long as you follow the stated 150 metres, it is not within the land owner's right to chase you away. They may warn you of bear sightings nearby, or bad weather reports, and advise you to move on, and you may be inclined to do as they say. They can also be grumpy and angry at you, and you may be inclined to do as they say, but you have a right to be there for two days. However, I believe that if you are hindering commercial activity, like felling of trees (which they can't do if you're sleeping right next to it), then they can make you leave. – Arthur Jan 29 '18 at 13:42
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    @Panzercrisis: Here's the Norwegian version of the page. My Norwegian is limited, but as far as I can tell, the 48 hour (to døgn = "two days") limit only applies "close to where people live" (i nærheten av der folk bor). – Ilmari Karonen Jan 29 '18 at 23:16
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    @Thomas and Arthur: The land owner has the right to order you to leave if you “opptrer hensynsløst eller ved utilbørlig atferd utsetter eiendommen eller berettigete interesser for skade eller ulempe” (“behave in an inconsiderate manner, or through improper conduct expose the property or legitimate interests therein to injury or nuisance”). On the other hand, a land owner is not allowed to put up “no access” signs or build barriers or fences on land marked as utmark without a prior agreement with local authorities. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jan 30 '18 at 11:25
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You can camp on "out-land", which is anything not maintained/cultivated like lawns, fields, etc. I don't think ownership is an issue (no land is not owned).

In "low-land" (<200m above sea level?) you can only camp (raise a tent) for two days in the same place, in the "high-land" (everything else) there is no limit.

https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allemannsretten (Addition: English)

Here are some more details. Tent must be at least 150m from any building. There may be additional restrictions during the reindeer hunt.

(Addition: For tidsrommet umiddelbart før og under villreinjakten kan departementet på nærmere avgrenset høgfjellsområde forby eller regulere teltslåing som kan være til ulempe for villreinjakten. approx "immediately before or during the reindeer hunt, in any designated high-mountain area, tenting may be forbidden or regulated")

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