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My husband is a refugee in Papua New Guinea and has been issued a refugee travel document, Titre De Voyage by the Papuan government.

Are there any countries in the EU where he can enter visa-free/visa on arrival - preferably Germany?

  • It would probably help if you stated your own citizenship, residency and status, as well as the original citizenship of your husband. – jcaron Jan 9 '18 at 12:37
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    1. Titre de Voyage replaces passport (since refugees cannot obtain one in their home country), it is does not give any additional right to visit any country, the holder must aplly for a visa in a usual way. 2. There are no countries with visa on arrival in the EU. – Neusser Jan 9 '18 at 12:37
  • jcaron - I am a Danish citizen with an EU passport. Denmark is, unfortunately, out of the question due to the strict immigration rules. My husband is Iranian. – Zoli Jan 9 '18 at 14:45
  • @Zoli, you should edit the question and probably even the subject line because your citizenship makes a big difference. Visa to Germany for family member of EU citizen with ... – o.m. Jan 9 '18 at 17:26
  • @Neusser What you are writing is somewhere between misleading and plain incorrect. Several states actually grant more privileges to holders of refugee travel documents than holder of 'only' regular passports. For example Germany allows visa free entry to holders of refugee travel documents if the document entitles the holder to reenter the issuing state, even if the holder according to citizenship would otherwise have needed a visa. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Jan 9 '18 at 20:08
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If you are an EU citizen and your husband is not, you have a right under EU regulations to travel and work in any other EU country and to take your husband with you. (Your own country is an exception because national laws apply there.)

So if he is going to travel with you, he can apply for a visa as a dependent of an EU citizen. This visa is free of charge, will be processed quickly, and requires fewer supporting documents. In theory you could also show up with him at a Schengen land border and get a visa there, but doing so will be impractical because airlines will not transport him without a visa.

Him being Iranian or having a Papuan travel document are not obstacle to your right as an EU citizen to travel with your family. It would have to be very specific information in him (or doubts in the validity of the marriage) to deny him a visa.

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Your husband can enter Germany with a refugee travel document if:

  • the travel document is issued by an EEA member or by a state which citizens are allowed to enter Germany without a visa (this does not apply)
  • or if the travel document allows the holder to reenter the issuing state for at least four months (this may apply).

Source: AufenthV § 18

So, basically you have to check if the travel document allows your husband to reenter Papua New Guinea for at least four months after the planned trip to Germany, as this may be allowed or restricted on an individual basis.

Be aware, that this is the legal situation in Germany and that there may be other restrictions effective in other Schengen countries. Transit through other Schengen countries on your way to Germany or proceeding from Germany to other Schengen countries may be prohibited.

o.m.'s answer is also basically correct (your husband is entitled to a visa since he is married to you as an EU citizen), but I disagree with 'will be processed quickly, and requires fewer supporting documents'. Yes, this may be the wording and intention of the relevant regulation, but depending on where you married, it can turn out to be a quite complex matter to convince a consulate to recognize the authenticity of your marriage.

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  • Thank you for these great answers. So - just to make things even more confusing. – Zoli Jan 10 '18 at 3:13

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