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What does an incidental amount means when booking a hotel in Las Vegas? Could this amount be changed from the originally mentioned amount? Is this amount will be totally refundable? Because this will double the cost of my booking.

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    Context is necessary, especially when the grammar is faulty. – Peter Dec 20 '17 at 14:42
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"Incidentals" are the subject heading under which hotels typically put everything other than the basic rate plus taxes you're paying for your room. Depending on your rate and the location, this might include in-room phone calls, orders from the TV/on demand Entertainment system, room service, the mini-bar and any dining at the hotel and charging it to your room number. To make sure people don't run off without paying, a charge is frequently blocked out for this in advance, either by a deposit (for cash or debit bookings) or by placing an authorisation hold on a credit card (so that your credit limit is temporarily reduced by that amount). The level is frequently higher at tourist destinations and resort hotels, since people are more likely to avail themselves of those kinds of services.

Under normal circumstances you'd expect the full amount to be refunded, or the hold to be cancelled providing you don't actually spend any money in this way, but if you're in doubt it's probably best to confirm this with the hotel you're booking with directly, since it's just possible that some of the fees they class as incidental get automatically added to your bill unless you clearly opt out. In extreme circumstances (e.g. you end up draining the entire mini-bar) you might even get charged something on top of the estimate.

  • So far, all my Vegas hotel bookings were charged as ‘pending’ and just disappeared after some days. – Aganju Dec 20 '17 at 17:06
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    +1. Probably worth noting that most Vegas hotels, pathetically, charge a "resort fee" on top of the room rate, which isn't refundable. That should be disclosed somewhere on their website, but it's easy to be surprised by it. The resort fee is different than incidentals, but it will appear on your bill and will be charged to your card. – Zach Lipton Dec 20 '17 at 19:54

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