6

My girlfriend, an EU citizen, is travelling from Sydney back to Brussels with a connection in Doha. What she booked was one trip, but Qatar Airways split it in two: Sydney - Doha then Doha - Brussels. She's not supposed to leave the Doha airport.

The Sydney - Doha flight got cancelled because of a system failure in the airplane. Her flight Doha - Brussels is not cancelled.

When I'm looking for information about the whole situation I only land on Qatar Airways' "EU Air passenger rights" page that speaks only about flights regarding the EU airspace, not EU passengers.

Since she can't make it to the Doha - Brussels flight because of a failure in the first flight from the same company, is she entitled to compensation as usual, as described by the EU's Flight Compensation Regulation EC 261/2004? If not, what is she entitled to?

  • It's all on one ticket, or on two separate tickets? If it was once one, but is now two, under what circumstances was it split? – Jim MacKenzie Nov 19 '17 at 21:17
  • @JimMacKenzie It was one booking with two tickets. She entered the airport with one reservation but ended up with two boarding passes. – Olivier Grégoire Nov 19 '17 at 21:22
  • Are both flights operated by Qatar Airways? If so, she is not entitled to compensation according to the EU regulations in any case. It doesn't matter if the flight was split or not. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Nov 19 '17 at 21:23
  • 5
    Flights (including multi-leg flights) from a third country to a destination in the EEA are only covered by the EU regulation if the operating air carrier is from an EEA country, which is not the case in this situation. I am not familiar with Australian or Qatari compensation regulations. – Tor-Einar Jarnbjo Nov 19 '17 at 21:30
  • 8
    "but Qatar Airways split it in two" The fact that Qatar gave her two boarding passes doesn't mean they split the ticket. It's still one ticket, with two flights. – user67108 Nov 20 '17 at 4:43
4

You are not entitled to any compensation whatsoever under EU air passenger rights:

If you take a flight which arrives in the EU from outside the EU and is operated by an non-EU airline

Likewise Australia doesn't have any government mandated compensation schemes for flight cancellation and neither does Qatar. The only thing you can count on is a full refund of whatever you paid originally for this flight, assuming you don't agree to an alternative re-routing.

  • You edited the question title to make it EU-compensation only. Another part of the question is still "If not [entitled to EU's compensation], what is she entitled to?", the new title puts that entirely away and this answer answers then the EU-compensation only part. It looks like you edited the question to fit the answer, unless I'm missing something? – Olivier Grégoire Dec 11 '17 at 11:53
  • @OlivierGrégoire well, you have only asked about EU compensation in the body of your question. Feel free to edit it. – JonathanReez Dec 11 '17 at 12:17
  • The body of the question contains "If not, what is she entitled to?" – Olivier Grégoire Dec 11 '17 at 12:18
  • @OlivierGrégoire Answer updated. Unfortunately there is nothing you can get except your money back. – JonathanReez Dec 11 '17 at 12:26
  • This is indeed much more complete. Thank you! – Olivier Grégoire Dec 11 '17 at 12:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.