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I'm travelling from A to B with an off peak train ticket. I know that peak times are set by station. How do I know the peak times for each station? Is this possible without having to mock a ticket purchase, there must be an easier way!

Is there a simple list of stations and the peak times (i.e. London Paddington: 6-9:30, 17-19:30)

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Your question is based on a false premise, that there are constant off-peak times at each station. One source of (unofficial) information is http://www.brfares.com where you can search for all rail tickets between any two stations. Clicking on the appropriate tickets, you can see that each off peak ticket has a restriction code associated with it limiting (among other things) the time it can be used. To take a couple of examples (both would typically head into Kings Cross station):

Off peak return Stevenage - London terminals takes code 5J currently defined as (among other restrictions):

OUTWARD TRAVEL

Not valid on trains timed to depart after 04:29 and before 09:30, except:...

Off peak return Edinburgh - London terminals takes code 1E currently defined as (among other restrictions):

OUTWARD TRAVEL

Not valid on trains timed to arrive: London Terminals (except as shown below) after 04:29 and before 10:08;...

  • brfares is as official as anywhere else that uses the official data... – AakashM Sep 29 '17 at 8:01
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TLDR No

Stations do not have peak and off peak times, rather time restrictions depend on the ticket held. Each restriction is given a two letter code which can be looked up on National Rail Enquires.

To do this find the restriction code that relates to your journey. If you already have the tickets you can find them in the following places (highlighted in red):

New Format Ticket Old Format Ticket

In this case the new format ticket has a restriction code of WZ while the old format ticket has a code of 1C. To look these up on National Rail Enquires you would go to nre.co.uk/WZ and nre.co.uk/1C.

In this example a restriction code of 1C means for outward travel

Not valid on trains timed to arrive in London Liverpool Street or London Kings Cross after 04:29 and before 10:00.

  • Odd how the start date is after the valid until date, and it was printed after both, on the 'old' format ticket! – Dezza Sep 28 '17 at 20:11
  • They were example tickets that I got off National Rail Enquires. I never noticed how inconsistent they are. The prices are all wrong as well. – mpursuit Sep 29 '17 at 8:30
  • The restrictions associated with code 1C do not seen particularly relevant for a ticket from Cardiff. How can you arrive on a permitted route at either Kings Cross or Liverpool Street? – uɐɪ Sep 29 '17 at 10:39
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    @ʎəʞouɐɪ Restrictions can be like that. From Lancaster to London, off-peak tickets have restrictions but there exist no trains that meet those restrictions. – gerrit Sep 29 '17 at 11:04
  • @ʎəʞouɐɪ This could also be because I think the tickets are faked. I got them from the National Rail Enquires website where they show example tickets but the dates are impossible and the price is incorrect. A current Anytime 1st Class return is £378 and since it is a Anytime ticket it doesn't even have a restriction code! – mpursuit Sep 29 '17 at 11:23
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I think it is too complicated for a simple list. As a example, the London Midland conditions can be found here, and for just one company it is already confusing.

It depends not only on origin station, but also operator and final destination.

  • I can travel off-peak Euston to Coventry at any time in the evening on a slow (London Midland) train.
  • But not on the faster (Virgin) trains between 1501 and 1844.
  • And I couldn't get on the same London Midland train if I was only going as far as Milton Keynes (between 1649 and 1901)
  • And I could get on any of the Virgin trains if I were going as far as Glasgow.

Morning times are usually fairly simple, but the evening ones are anything but. (Worth noting that the evening peak is only relevant if travelling from major cities.)

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