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The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable, chargers. Chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry. At the other end of the spectrum my desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V, which works outbut that converts to be 10 amps at 120 VAC.

The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable, chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry. At the other end of the spectrum desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V, which works out to be 10 amps at 120 VAC.

The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable. Chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry. At the other end of the spectrum my desktop computer tower pulls 6 Amps at 230V, but that converts to be 10 amps at 120 VAC.

2 added 72 characters in body
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The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable (chargers, chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry, my. At the other end of the spectrum desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V), which works out to be 10 amps at 120 VAC.

The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable (chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry, my desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V).

The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable, chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry. At the other end of the spectrum desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V, which works out to be 10 amps at 120 VAC.

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The label on the adapter is known as "cover your backside". The adapter is being sold as a USA / Canada adapter and so lists current limits based on the target market voltage. So basically the manufacturer is saying if you use it in the USA with 120 VAC don't plug in anything that draws more than 10 Amps, as higher current could damage the device (even to the point of causing it to catch fire).

There is nothing to prevent you from using it for 220 VAC, as inside is simply conductors. Just keep your current needs reasonable (chargers for things like phones pull less than 1 amp, so not a worry, my desktop computer tower only pulls 6 Amps at 230V).