2 http://grammarist.com/spelling/buses-busses/
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You'll find that in Berlin especially you won't be asked for your ticket whenever you board your bus or U-Bahn train. I wasn't asked for a ticket at any point, although it is polite to show it to your driver if you are boarding your bus at the front.

Inspectors are often disguised though, on my U-Bahn to the airport the inspectors unzipped their jackets to reveal ID tags and started asking for tickets in the middle of the carriage. It was all rather dramatic.

An AB ticket is probably all you need, I had a five day ABC ticket and allowed me on pretty much all public transport throughout Berlin - Bus, train, S-Bahn. Getting around Berlin is easy, most hotels will offer you a travel map and train lines/bus routes are often marked on there.

Most German'sGermans speak English, and there are a lot of signs in English. I never felt lost and I travelled alone.

Do note: Always remember to stamp your ticket after you have purchased it. There are stamp machines on the trains and bussesbuses, if you don't stamp your ticket it will not be valid and inspectors will charge you a penalty. You only need to stamp it once for it to be valid (not every time you get on a bus/train).

You'll find that in Berlin especially you won't be asked for your ticket whenever you board your bus or U-Bahn train. I wasn't asked for a ticket at any point, although it is polite to show it to your driver if you are boarding your bus at the front.

Inspectors are often disguised though, on my U-Bahn to the airport the inspectors unzipped their jackets to reveal ID tags and started asking for tickets in the middle of the carriage. It was all rather dramatic.

An AB ticket is probably all you need, I had a five day ABC ticket and allowed me on pretty much all public transport throughout Berlin - Bus, train, S-Bahn. Getting around Berlin is easy, most hotels will offer you a travel map and train lines/bus routes are often marked on there.

Most German's speak English, and there are a lot of signs in English. I never felt lost and I travelled alone.

Do note: Always remember to stamp your ticket after you have purchased it. There are stamp machines on the trains and busses, if you don't stamp your ticket it will not be valid and inspectors will charge you a penalty. You only need to stamp it once for it to be valid (not every time you get on a bus/train).

You'll find that in Berlin especially you won't be asked for your ticket whenever you board your bus or U-Bahn train. I wasn't asked for a ticket at any point, although it is polite to show it to your driver if you are boarding your bus at the front.

Inspectors are often disguised though, on my U-Bahn to the airport the inspectors unzipped their jackets to reveal ID tags and started asking for tickets in the middle of the carriage. It was all rather dramatic.

An AB ticket is probably all you need, I had a five day ABC ticket and allowed me on pretty much all public transport throughout Berlin - Bus, train, S-Bahn. Getting around Berlin is easy, most hotels will offer you a travel map and train lines/bus routes are often marked on there.

Most Germans speak English, and there are a lot of signs in English. I never felt lost and I travelled alone.

Do note: Always remember to stamp your ticket after you have purchased it. There are stamp machines on the trains and buses, if you don't stamp your ticket it will not be valid and inspectors will charge you a penalty. You only need to stamp it once for it to be valid (not every time you get on a bus/train).

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source | link

You'll find that in Berlin especially you won't be asked for your ticket whenever you board your bus or U-Bahn train. I wasn't asked for a ticket at any point, although it is polite to show it to your driver if you are boarding your bus at the front.

Inspectors are often disguised though, on my U-Bahn to the airport the inspectors unzipped their jackets to reveal ID tags and started asking for tickets in the middle of the carriage. It was all rather dramatic.

An AB ticket is probably all you need, I had a five day ABC ticket and allowed me on pretty much all public transport throughout Berlin - Bus, train, S-Bahn. Getting around Berlin is easy, most hotels will offer you a travel map and train lines/bus routes are often marked on there.

Most German's speak English, and there are a lot of signs in English. I never felt lost and I travelled alone.

Do note: Always remember to stamp your ticket after you have purchased it. There are stamp machines on the trains and busses, if you don't stamp your ticket it will not be valid and inspectors will charge you a penalty. You only need to stamp it once for it to be valid (not every time you get on a bus/train).