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The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

On US domestic flights, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". It's the same thing they do with baby strollers. Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

Some airlines (especially in Europe) will not return your bag to the front of the plane. They will give you an actual luggage check and your bag will be delivered at the baggage carousel. In any case, you're no worse off than if you had checked the bag in the first place.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

On US domestic flights, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

On US domestic flights, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". It's the same thing they do with baby strollers. Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

Some airlines (especially in Europe) will not return your bag to the front of the plane. They will give you an actual luggage check and your bag will be delivered at the baggage carousel. In any case, you're no worse off than if you had checked the bag in the first place.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.
3 added 2 characters in body
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The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

In almost every caseOn US domestic flights, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

In almost every case, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

On US domestic flights, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.
2 added 323 characters in body
source | link

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

In almost every case, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.

In almost every case, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.

The standard rule is one bag for the overhead, plus one small "purse" that fits under the seat in front of you.

Caveats:

  • Airport and airline staff are busy. They are unlikely to pay attention to what you're trying to bring on the plane in many cases. That said,
  • When you get on the plane, if you are later in the boarding process or if the flight is full (which is very common nowadays), you may find that there is no room in the overhead bin. This is your problem, not the airline's. Some people feel like it's the flight attendants' responsibility to magically cause 6 suitcases to fit in the space of 3. Believe me, if they had that kind of power to alter the laws of physics, they wouldn't be working as flight attendants.
  • You may also find yourself sitting in a seat where there is NO room under the seat in front of you. This may be because you are in an exit row, or behind a bulkhead, galley, or bathroom, or in a business class or first class where there are fancy reclining seats that go all the way to the ground and have no room for storage below them.
  • No-frills airlines (RyanAir, etc) operate on a business model that consists of torturing you unnecessarily, then charging you fees to remove the torture. They may be very strict about what you can bring on board. If you're on a super-cheap airline, check their website for specific rules and expect them to be enforced.

In almost every case, if you simply can't find a place for your carry on bags, you will be able to "gate check" it. People are unnecessarily terrified of the "gate check". Here's how a gate check works:

  • Flight attendent takes your bag and puts a special tag on it
  • He or she gives your bag to a luggage handler who puts it in the cargo hold in the very front
  • When the flight lands, the very first thing that happens is that the luggage handlers remove all the gate checked bags and bring them right up to the front of the plane
  • By the time you're getting off, your bag is usually waiting for you -- in the worst case scenario you might have to wait a minute or two.

So the frequent flyer's best plan is:

  • Carry a rollerboard with clothes and stuff that you don't need on the flight
  • Carry a laptop bag, purse, or knapsack with everything you need for the flight
  • If you can't find room in the overhead bin, gate check your rollerboard and enjoy the flight.
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