2 Corrected English phonetics for pronunciation of French "carnet"
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No, Paris has no such thing. It's probably going to happen one day, but at the moment, Navigo cards are only for commuter passes (one calendar week or longer). You see a lot of them because most locals have one (whether they live in Paris or only work there). For infrequent visitors, you'll need paper tickets: typically a “ticket T” (good for one trip in the Metro + RER within Paris, or (not both) for one bus + tram trip (excluding some buses outside the city limits, in particular the airport express buses)), which is markedly cheaper if you buy 10 of them (a carnet, pronounced carneycar-NAY). (These tickets are not nominative and have no preemption date, so you can buy 10 and spread them around multiple trips and over the whole party.)

There are also day passes (Mobilis) and tourist passes as well as the youth week-end ticket. You have to make up your mind at the beginning of your trip whether you'll go for a pass or not, there's nothing like London's automatic cap when you reach the day ticket rate. Beware that Paris's day passes exclude the airport express services.

No, Paris has no such thing. It's probably going to happen one day, but at the moment, Navigo cards are only for commuter passes (one calendar week or longer). You see a lot of them because most locals have one (whether they live in Paris or only work there). For infrequent visitors, you'll need paper tickets: typically a “ticket T” (good for one trip in the Metro + RER within Paris, or (not both) for one bus + tram trip (excluding some buses outside the city limits, in particular the airport express buses)), which is markedly cheaper if you buy 10 of them (a carnet, pronounced carney). (These tickets are not nominative and have no preemption date, so you can buy 10 and spread them around multiple trips and over the whole party.)

There are also day passes (Mobilis) and tourist passes as well as the youth week-end ticket. You have to make up your mind at the beginning of your trip whether you'll go for a pass or not, there's nothing like London's automatic cap when you reach the day ticket rate. Beware that Paris's day passes exclude the airport express services.

No, Paris has no such thing. It's probably going to happen one day, but at the moment, Navigo cards are only for commuter passes (one calendar week or longer). You see a lot of them because most locals have one (whether they live in Paris or only work there). For infrequent visitors, you'll need paper tickets: typically a “ticket T” (good for one trip in the Metro + RER within Paris, or (not both) for one bus + tram trip (excluding some buses outside the city limits, in particular the airport express buses)), which is markedly cheaper if you buy 10 of them (a carnet, pronounced car-NAY). (These tickets are not nominative and have no preemption date, so you can buy 10 and spread them around multiple trips and over the whole party.)

There are also day passes (Mobilis) and tourist passes as well as the youth week-end ticket. You have to make up your mind at the beginning of your trip whether you'll go for a pass or not, there's nothing like London's automatic cap when you reach the day ticket rate. Beware that Paris's day passes exclude the airport express services.

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source | link

No, Paris has no such thing. It's probably going to happen one day, but at the moment, Navigo cards are only for commuter passes (one calendar week or longer). You see a lot of them because most locals have one (whether they live in Paris or only work there). For infrequent visitors, you'll need paper tickets: typically a “ticket T” (good for one trip in the Metro + RER within Paris, or (not both) for one bus + tram trip (excluding some buses outside the city limits, in particular the airport express buses)), which is markedly cheaper if you buy 10 of them (a carnet, pronounced carney). (These tickets are not nominative and have no preemption date, so you can buy 10 and spread them around multiple trips and over the whole party.)

There are also day passes (Mobilis) and tourist passes as well as the youth week-end ticket. You have to make up your mind at the beginning of your trip whether you'll go for a pass or not, there's nothing like London's automatic cap when you reach the day ticket rate. Beware that Paris's day passes exclude the airport express services.