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Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer. I often use seatguru to find the row directly ahead of the exit row because there will be no children therebehind me - or the row behind the exit row if I need to do work on my laptop, because the exit row seats are not capable of reclining. 

MyselfIn addition personally, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer. I often use seatguru to find the row directly ahead of the exit row because there will be no children there - or the row behind the exit row, because the exit row seats are not capable of reclining.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer. I often use seatguru to find the row directly ahead of the exit row because there will be no children behind me - or the row behind the exit row if I need to do work on my laptop, because exit row seats are not capable of reclining. 

In addition personally, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

5 added 245 characters in body
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Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer. I often use seatguru to find the row directly ahead of the exit row because there will be no children there - or the row behind the exit row, because the exit row seats are not capable of reclining.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer. I often use seatguru to find the row directly ahead of the exit row because there will be no children there - or the row behind the exit row, because the exit row seats are not capable of reclining.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

4 added 82 characters in body
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Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

Children and infants are not allowed in the emergency exit rows of airplanes. However, it only provides a guarantee that a child won’t sit next (laterally) to you — one might still be behind or ahead of you in a non-exit row. If you can find a plane where the exit rows correspond with a change in class or there are multiple exit rows, you might be able to build more of a buffer.

Myself, I find that earplugs or a good set of noise cancelling headphones along with good music or a movie of my choice more than drowns out the world. If you’re really bothered, in-ear earplugs combined with over the ear noise cancelling headsets (or in-ear noise cancelling headphones combined with over the ear ear protection) will give you around 40dB of noise reduction - more than needed for most children.

Finally, parents of small children often can’t afford to fly business or first class. There’s also greater seat separation and/or privacy partitioning in those classes. You may find that one way that airlines offer a “choice” (albeit expensive one) to business travelers who absolutely need to get some sleep or work done.

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