2 fixed spelling of airasiaX and... minor changes to meet spelling counts.
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So far as I can tell, there are no commercial flights that are entirely child-free, There are unlikely to be, as the economics of commercial aviation work against it—the flying public favors low fares over essentially all other considerations. Every few years there is a new column suggesting it, but in the end, people aren't really willing to pay what it would take to support a child-free flight network.

From 1953 to 1970, United Airlines [in]famously offered so-called Executive flights that were for men only, between New York and Chicago and between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Cigar and pipe smoking were allowed, women and children were not. That was probably the last of it for entirely child-free flights, certainly from any U.S. carrier.

There are, however, a number of airlines that have "child-free zones" on selected flights. Malaysian Airlines was the first in recent years, banning children from the upper deck on its A380s. Scoot offers a ScootinSilence upgrade for economy; no one under the age of 12 may be seated in the front of their 787 cabins. AirAisaAirAsia X, the long-haul sister airline of AirAsia, offers what they call a Quiet Zone:

1. What is Quiet Zone?
- Quiet Zone is an exclusive seating area between rows 7-14.
- Only available to guest who is aged 10 years and above.

Speaking as someone without children who flies a lot, I think it's a silly marketing ploy; I encounter far, far more annoying adults than annoying children on any given trip. Besides, it isn't as if there is a soundproof barrier around those sections. IndiGo offers child-free seating in rows 1–4 and 11–14, but sitting in row 4 won't insulate you from a fussy toddler in row 5.

Whether the option will spread outside of Southeast and South Asia remains to be seen. Even though The Independent declared it a "growing movement," there have been no new announcements since IndiGo'sIndiGo announced it in 2016.

So far as I can tell, there are no commercial flights that are entirely child-free, There are unlikely to be, as the economics of commercial aviation work against it—the flying public favors low fares over essentially all other considerations. Every few years there is a new column suggesting it, but in the end, people aren't really willing to pay what it would take to support a child-free flight network.

From 1953 to 1970, United Airlines [in]famously offered so-called Executive flights that were for men only, between New York and Chicago and between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Cigar and pipe smoking were allowed, women and children were not. That was probably the last of it for entirely child-free flights, certainly from any U.S. carrier.

There are, however, a number of airlines that have "child-free zones" on selected flights. Malaysian Airlines was the first in recent years, banning children from the upper deck on its A380s. Scoot offers a ScootinSilence upgrade for economy; no one under the age of 12 may be seated in the front of their 787 cabins. AirAisa X, the long-haul sister airline of AirAsia, offers what they call a Quiet Zone:

1. What is Quiet Zone?
- Quiet Zone is an exclusive seating area between rows 7-14.
- Only available to guest who is aged 10 years and above.

Speaking as someone without children who flies a lot, I think it's a silly marketing ploy; I encounter far, far more annoying adults than annoying children on any given trip. Besides, it isn't as if there is a soundproof barrier around those sections. IndiGo offers child-free seating in rows 1–4 and 11–14, but sitting in row 4 won't insulate you from a fussy toddler in row 5.

Whether the option will spread outside of Southeast and South Asia remains to be seen. Even though The Independent declared it a "growing movement," there have been no new announcements since IndiGo's in 2016.

So far as I can tell, there are no commercial flights that are entirely child-free, There are unlikely to be, as the economics of commercial aviation work against it—the flying public favors low fares over essentially all other considerations. Every few years there is a new column suggesting it, but in the end, people aren't really willing to pay what it would take to support a child-free flight network.

From 1953 to 1970, United Airlines [in]famously offered so-called Executive flights that were for men only, between New York and Chicago and between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Cigar and pipe smoking were allowed, women and children were not. That was probably the last of it for entirely child-free flights, certainly from any U.S. carrier.

There are, however, a number of airlines that have "child-free zones" on selected flights. Malaysian Airlines was the first in recent years, banning children from the upper deck on its A380s. Scoot offers a ScootinSilence upgrade for economy; no one under the age of 12 may be seated in the front of their 787 cabins. AirAsia X, the long-haul sister airline of AirAsia, offers what they call a Quiet Zone:

1. What is Quiet Zone?
- Quiet Zone is an exclusive seating area between rows 7-14.
- Only available to guest who is aged 10 years and above.

Speaking as someone without children who flies a lot, I think it's a silly marketing ploy; I encounter far, far more annoying adults than annoying children on any given trip. Besides, it isn't as if there is a soundproof barrier around those sections. IndiGo offers child-free seating in rows 1–4 and 11–14, but sitting in row 4 won't insulate you from a fussy toddler in row 5.

Whether the option will spread outside of Southeast and South Asia remains to be seen. Even though The Independent declared it a "growing movement," there have been no new announcements since IndiGo announced it in 2016.

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So far as I can tell, there are no commercial flights that are entirely child-free, There are unlikely to be, as the economics of commercial aviation work against it—the flying public favors low fares over essentially all other considerations. Every few years there is a new column suggesting it, but in the end, people aren't really willing to pay what it would take to support a child-free flight network.

From 1953 to 1970, United Airlines [in]famously offered so-called Executive flights that were for men only, between New York and Chicago and between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Cigar and pipe smoking were allowed, women and children were not. That was probably the last of it for entirely child-free flights, certainly from any U.S. carrier.

There are, however, a number of airlines that have "child-free zones" on selected flights. Malaysian Airlines was the first in recent years, banning children from the upper deck on its A380s. Scoot offers a ScootinSilence upgrade for economy; no one under the age of 12 may be seated in the front of their 787 cabins. AirAisa X, the long-haul sister airline of AirAsia, offers what they call a Quiet Zone:

1. What is Quiet Zone?
- Quiet Zone is an exclusive seating area between rows 7-14.
- Only available to guest who is aged 10 years and above.

Speaking as someone without children who flies a lot, I think it's a silly marketing ploy; I encounter far, far more annoying adults than annoying children on any given trip. Besides, it isn't as if there is a soundproof barrier around those sections. IndiGo offers child-free seating in rows 1–4 and 11–14, but sitting in row 4 won't insulate you from a fussy toddler in row 5.

Whether the option will spread outside of Southeast and South Asia remains to be seen. Even though The Independent declared it a "growing movement," there have been no new announcements since IndiGo's in 2016.