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Apr
27
comment Can I get a visa to Spain with a U.S. Travel Document as a Permanent Resident?
@MichaelHampton: The US only issues two types of passport-like "Travel Documents" -- Re-entry Permits and Refugee Travel Documents. They look mostly the same. Since he says it is not a RTD, it must be a Re-entry Permit. The eligibility for a Re-entry Permit is to be a permanent resident, which matches what he describes.
Apr
27
comment Can I get a visa to Spain with a U.S. Travel Document as a Permanent Resident?
@MichaelHampton: Because most people don't know that's what it's called. The cover just says "Travel Document". It's applied for with a form that says Application for Travel Document. You even sometimes see people referring to it as a "white passport" even though it is not white and that name does not show up anywhere. It's just poorly known.
Apr
27
comment Can I get a visa to Spain with a U.S. Travel Document as a Permanent Resident?
@MichaelHampton: From the description, it must be a Re-entry Permit.
Apr
25
comment Visa J1 and Visa Waiver Program during grace period
Note that a US visa is only for entry and the visa's expiration date only means the last day on which you can use the visa to enter the US. It has nothing to do with your ability to stay in or leave the US. Your ability to stay in the US is determined by your status, which for J1 is generally determined by your DS-2019.
Apr
25
answered What can I do if my allowed duration of stay in the US (based on the passport stamp) is too short?
Apr
22
comment Typical validity period of a J-1 visa
Generally, the length of validity for each nationality and type of US visa can be found on the Visa Reciprocity Tables. Enter the country of nationality, and then select the visa classification from the drop-down menu.
Apr
21
revised czech-republic wiki description
czechia
Apr
20
suggested approved edit on czech-republic tag wiki
Apr
20
suggested rejected edit on czech-republic tag wiki excerpt
Apr
20
comment I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark?
@KevinFegan: The question is only about nationality. It might make sense to get a copy of what they filled out for the nationality question -- if they have no idea now what nationalities they could possibly have, to get a starting point (and even then, they might have had multiple nationalities and only put one, or they put one that wasn't actually correct; so they can't rely on it; it can only serve as a hint) -- but, the OP actually already has a very good idea what one or two countries he could have the nationality of, so such a hint provides him no information.
Apr
20
comment J1 visa, going home to UK, returning to visit using the Visa Waiver Program?
@MichaelHampton: That's not relevant for this question. The two-year home residency requirement only affects getting H and L visas and permanent residency.
Apr
20
comment I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark?
@HankyPanky: That would be like saying that if you don't know what your marital status history was, to just ask IRS, because the IRS has a lot to do with whether you were married or not, because the filing status on the tax form is supposed to be based on your marital status. But of course it's you who filled out the form in the first place. So you would only be getting your own claim, and not anything more.
Apr
20
comment I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark?
@HankyPanky: I didn't say they didn't have to do with US immigration, but with foreign nationality. The only time when nationality comes up in applying for a green card is that the OP (or parents) filled out a form where the OP put a country on there as their nationality. The burden is on the person filling it out to provide the right answer. USCIS does not, for the most part, care about what is put there, because the current nationality doesn't really matter for US immigration purposes. Getting a copy of a form that you filled out in the first place does not provide you with any information.
Apr
20
comment I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark?
@corsiKa: "I would expect the USCIS to be the go-to expert for all things related to entering and leaving the country." Actually, USCIS has nothing to do with entering or leaving the country. CBP has to do with entering the country.
Apr
19
comment I don't know my nationality. How can I visit Denmark?
But USCIS doesn't have anything to do with foreign nationalities. And the US doesn't care about what foreign nationalities a permanent resident has. A permanent resident could have gained or lost nationalities since becoming a permanent resident; USCIS would not know anything about that. The most you can get is a copy of the forms you filled out to apply for things with USCIS, to see what you wrote back then, but that would be information that you would already know. USCIS is not qualified to determine whether the country you claimed to be a national of actually consider you a national.
Apr
19
comment Does Visa validity period of US refers to duration of stay?
Essentially only people in F or J status get "D/S". People on various work visas get a fixed period of stay, depending on the particular status, and usually up to the expiration of their petition for those statuses that require a petition.
Apr
19
comment Does Visa validity period of US refers to duration of stay?
Maybe it says "H1B1"? That's a type of visa for Chilean or Singaporean nationals.
Apr
19
comment Does Visa validity period of US refers to duration of stay?
@CMaster: Both are nonimmigrant visas. An "immigrant visa" is one that immediately makes you a permanent resident upon entry.
Apr
18
comment Traveling to US with ESTA but have an Iranian father. Do I need a visa instead?
@Dennis: The same thing applies to people born abroad. People are citizens automatically at birth if the conditions in the law are satisfied (and these conditions do not depend on whether the person or parents want it or not). The US government does not know, and may never know, the identities of such people born abroad, at least until they (or their descendant) want to claim something on the basis of that citizenship, but that doesn't meant they don't have citizenship according to the law.
Apr
18
comment Traveling to US with ESTA but have an Iranian father. Do I need a visa instead?
@Dennis: "Involuntary" means it is not up to you or your parent's choice. Citizenship is a matter of law, based only on the facts. Evidence comes into play when later if you want to prove whether someone already has citizenship or not, but not having evidence doesn't mean the person isn't a citizen. By the way, a "birth record" is not "required to be kept by US law". Some people born in the US at home may not have a state birth record (at least until the family reports it, which may or may not happen), but that doesn't mean they are not US citizens automatically from birth.