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13

The Schengen agreement (and the convention implementing it and EU regulations that replaced it) is only about short stays under three months. Whether they need a visa or not (Australian citizens do not), third-country nationals cannot stay more than three months in the Schengen area under those rules. To stay longer, you need a national visa or residence ...


6

I'm currently travelling long term. Your priorities may differ from mine, I'm a male and care about the look of my footwear to the extent that they don't stand out or look obviously inappropriate for whatever I'm doing. I'll tell you what's worked really well for me. All-black running shoes. As in, specialist running shoes. personally I went for Brooks ...


6

I like to use trail/approach shoes as my all purpose shoe. They're flexible and soft enough to be comfortable long term, you can buy them to different levels of breathability/enclosed to cater to climates, and you can walk all day in them with their grippy, hiking boot like soles and air cushioning. You might have some difficulty getting in to nightclubs ...


5

First, it would help if you told us where you permanently reside. Indeed, if you are from the Quebec province, there is an agreement between the RAMQ (medical insurance in Quebec) and the French Sécurité Sociale. If you are from somewhere else, you might still find some insurances covering for more than a year. I found Bon Voyage, Desjardins (but they say ...


5

My wife is an immigration consultant with her own license in Canada. Here is what she said to me when I asked her to read your question of course he can just come in and visit temporarily. that's nothing to do with his working holiday visa. he will only get a work permit upon entry when he shows his visa approval letter to the immigration officer. Every ...


4

Getting a long-stay visa from Germany will not in itself allow you to travel in the other Schengen countries more than you would otherwise be allowed to. (Since you're Australian, you don't need a visa for short stays; if your nationality had been one that needs visas, the long-stay visa would effectively also function as a multiple-entry short-stay visa for ...


4

It depends on the specific country, even countries that are part of the Schengen area haven't harmonised their policy in this area. For example, you can do that in Germany (using either your Japanese or your Australian passport) or in the Netherlands (only for Australians, Japanese citizens are not covered there) but not in France. There is in fact a Working ...


4

Most definitely. Each Working Holiday visa is an agreement between the country of your citizenship (Australia) and the country issuing the visa. Not all counties offer working holiday visas, and if they do, they don't offer them to every country either. When I was of working holiday visa age, I found Anyworkanywhere to be handy - I've set it to show the ...


3

The problem you'll face Basically, it can be very tricky and sometimes disallowed, as several friends have found out unexpectedly in the past few years. Let's take one example. He finished, left to Israel for a wedding, and flew back to spend a week in the UK, figured he'd enter on tourist visa (Kiwi, but also on working holiday visa). 7 hours later....he ...


3

You will pass through Canadian Immigration in Vancouver, where they will process your application for a work permit. Your flight from Vancouver to Edmonton will be a domestic flight with no formalities in Edmonton.


3

I'm assuming your partner's British passport is because he has UK citizenship (in addition to Australian). As an Australian citizen you don't need a visa to enter most European countries for stays up to 90 days per rolling 180 day period, but you will need a residence permit if you stay in, say, the Schengen area beyond that limit. (Which sounds likely to ...


2

If the Working Holiday application has already been submitted (and the fee has been collected) and you believe the application will be refused, you can withdraw it if a decision has not been reached. Applying for a visitor visa shortly afterwards is perilous. Serial applications often suggest a secondary agenda which is unrelated to tourism or business. ...


2

For a long term trip (12, 15 months), I would pack 4 pairs of shoes: Shoes you usually wear every day at home. trail/walking shoes (see CMaster's answer). flip flops (if you're already used to wearing them) it can be hot in these places. dress shoes, when going out in the evening; it is nice to dress up once in a while. 1 and 2 can/could be merged. I ...


2

This government website says the maximum period for a Working Holiday MVV is 1 year. This brochure for working holidays says you cannot apply if you have previously used this visa. So it looks like you are not eligible for another working holiday visa. You could get a 90 day schengen visa, but this does not permit you to work. You could get an exchange ...


2

Australia and New Zealand (which I assume you are aware, but I'm stating it just to be clear) are different countries. As a result, any visa you get in Australia is separate, distinct, and does not affect a visa you received in New Zealand. Any visa you receive from Australia does not affect visas from other countries, including your working holiday visa ...


2

You are only allowed to do or be granted (if you don't use it) one single Work and Holiday visa, if you are eligible for it. And one such visa allows you to stay in New Zealand for up to a year, depending on your citizenship/residence. According to the tourism board of New Zealand, one condition to get a Work and Holiday visa is that you: Have not ...


1

Casual shoes to wear when you go out in the evening. Flip Flops Running/Walking shoes


1

When I travel I take a pair of (light) hiking boots and a pair of sandals or flip flops. While traveling, I might pick up an other pair, but most of the time those fall in the same category. I do not bother with dress up shoes, (but I do not go out when traveling alone either) and I never use shoes to run in, if you do use those take one pair instead of ...


1

Depending on duration and packing space, in order of importance: Comfortable shoes. Nice (dressup) shoes. Slippers. Sneakers (if the comfortable shoes are not already sneakers).


1

Yes, holiday working visas (and other long-stay visas or work permits) are separate for each country. Apart from a few general rules and very limited programs like the EU blue card (not fully implemented and not everybody participates…), the EU has no common policy regarding immigration from outside the union. Whether holiday working visas are available to ...


1

If you have your return ticket, and tell the immigration officer that you're visiting as a tourist now and come back on the visa later, there should be no problem. In fact, if the working holiday visa is on a separate piece of paper that is not attached to your passport, you can leave the visa at home (or better: take it with you, but don't put it into the ...


1

Like everybody else, you are “eligible” for a regular work visa but it's more complicated and expensive than a working holiday visa. I think it will in any case require help from your employer so it could work if you are doing skilled work and want to stay long-term but not if you simply want to extend a working holiday visa for a few months. In general, ...


1

The UK youth mobility visa does not grant you any extra rights outside of the UK. As an Australian citizen, you can however travel to all EU countries for at most 90 days without visa anyway (i.e. even without the UK youth mobility visa). Beware, in the Schengen area (i.e. most of the European Union), it's 90 days per 180-day period in the whole area, not 90 ...



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