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19

There's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily, and leaving permanently, which is as much as anything dictated by you returning to your place of residence. If you are in the US under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and you leave the US for a few weeks to visit Canada (or Mexico) with an intent to return to the US then you are deemed to ...


13

The Schengen agreement (and the convention implementing it and EU regulations that replaced it) is only about short stays under three months. Whether they need a visa or not (Australian citizens do not), third-country nationals cannot stay more than three months in the Schengen area under those rules. To stay longer, you need a national visa or residence ...


12

Having spent some time in the country, my suggestion would be Singapore. And here are my reasons: Consistent weather throughout the year with most of the rainfall concentrated in a few months. At first it might feel too hot but air-conditioning in housing, public areas, shopping centres, public transport et al is ubiquitous and you generally don't have to ...


9

I've moved countries a lot, doing contracts. One of the finest resources that I've found is meetup.com You sign up, give your city, and your interests, and it starts suggesting social groups and events for you! I've used it to meet people and try new things when I lived in Vancouver, and now here in Melbourne, Australia. We can't tell you what to do ...


9

Work visas aren't going to be given on arrival anywhere (I'd be highly surprised if they did). You'd be dealing with a lot of issues regarding taxation, potentially taking jobs away from local people, and benefits (or the lack thereof) - and Governments are starting to get really finicky about actual work visas as it is. Getting work visas, even ...


9

A seeming oasis of paperwork-free work possibilities is Georgia, a country not yet well established in the minds of travellers and tourists from the west, located between Turkey, Russia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, and the Black Sea. Now it doesn't answer the letter of your question but I believe it answers the spirit. If not to the original asker then certainly ...


8

There's precisely one case that I'm aware of: if you're a citizen of a country that has signed the Svalbard Treaty -- and you probably are, since signatories include most all of Europe, the US, Canada, India, China, Japan, Australia etc -- you are "allowed to become residents and to have access to Svalbard including the right to fish, hunt or undertake any ...


8

Yes, there are, the common term is perpetual traveller (PT). I've done this myself, living out of a rollaboard suitcase for a year and half, although I wasn't exactly a full-fledged PT since I was notionally both resident and paying taxes in Singapore (not a high-tax country, mind you). Most PTs who are in it for the long haul are either self-supportingly ...


7

These are my experiences concerning The Netherlands, since most laws about this are pretty similar around Europe this might apply to you as well. First of all, even though the first 90 days are free on holiday, in most countries when you stay over a month you do need to report to the immigration police at arrival in your city/town of residence. (This you ...


6

You've got a relatively specific criteria in your question, so I'll do my best to answer it. I would recommend the following destinations based on my personal experience: Palawan, Philippines: Not only does it fit your criteria, it's also home to a couple of the UNESCO world heritage sites. The underground river in Puerto Princesa is really amazing to ...


6

This is a pretty broad question, but I will give you some answers of my experiences: Kenting - Taiwan. Not exactly the cheapest (of SE Asia), but a nice place with good beaches. Internet access is abundant and it is warm in winter, while not hot. People are super nice. http://www.tealit.com/article_categories.php?section=travel&article=kenting ...


6

The French Consulate web site says the working holiday visa takes an average of 2 weeks, but 1 week is generally ok. We have an applicant of our Ski Jobs France program applying tomorrow, so will let you know the latest processing time. The quickest time this year has been 3 days, but it does vary.


6

If you're Australian, New Zealander or Canadian (and possibly other nationalities but I haven't looked), you can apply for a Working Holiday Visa for The Netherlands (assuming you're eligible) after you have arrived. In fact, it is preferred over applying prior to arrival. You are an Australian, Canadian or New Zealand citizen and you would like to spend ...


6

As long as you haven't exceeded the 90-days-in-any-180-day-period limit, you haven't overstayed. What's illegal is staying longer than you should, not missing some stamps per se. Framing the problem in that way, the question becomes: Who needs to prove that you did or did not fulfill the conditions of your stay and how? Article 11 of the Schengen Borders ...


6

I like to use trail/approach shoes as my all purpose shoe. They're flexible and soft enough to be comfortable long term, you can buy them to different levels of breathability/enclosed to cater to climates, and you can walk all day in them with their grippy, hiking boot like soles and air cushioning. You might have some difficulty getting in to nightclubs ...


6

I'm currently travelling long term. Your priorities may differ from mine, I'm a male and care about the look of my footwear to the extent that they don't stand out or look obviously inappropriate for whatever I'm doing. I'll tell you what's worked really well for me. All-black running shoes. As in, specialist running shoes. personally I went for Brooks ...


5

The formal name for this program is International Experience Canada. There is essentially nothing about it on the Canadian Border Services Agency site, other than explanations of how you can bring your possessions with you when you arrive. The Citizenship and Immigration Canada site wasn't much better but it turned out that was because the program has a site ...


5

Short answer: Your UK license is fine. Long answer: Australia is a federal state, each state licenses their own drivers, with the federal government having only minor oversight (eg. ensuring that a license valid in one state is valid in others as well). However, as far as I'm aware, all adhere to the same principle that temporary visitors -- including ...


5

If you are an EU citizen you don't need any work visa to work in a EU country As an EU national, you're entitled to work — for an employer or as a self-employed person — in any EU country without needing a work permit. There are some exceptions, for example: Croatian nationals still face temporary restrictions on working in the EU.


5

I might do my volunteering AFTER I arrived at my target city. And then walk in to the site of my choice. The director of an institution has a choice of two volunteers, both of whom are foreign, and speaks English better than the local language: Someone who has called or emailed him or her, leaving a message, or someone who's sitting in front of him/her, and ...


5

I find googling often yields annoying companies that want to charge you to volunteer. However someone gave me this resource for South America that is amazingly detailed and covers just about every option or country you could think of in that area of the world. Hope it's of interest / benefit: http://www.volunteersouthamerica.net/


5

I think this is subjective, but .... I'll give one suggestion. Argentina: Ocean - with whales in Puerto Madryn, you can sit on the hostel balcony and watch them in the sea. Warm - deserts in the west, warm weather in most of it, and rainforest in the north-east. Wifi - almost everywhere - every hostel and most restaurants and cafes have it. Great food - ...


5

My wife is an immigration consultant with her own license in Canada. Here is what she said to me when I asked her to read your question of course he can just come in and visit temporarily. that's nothing to do with his working holiday visa. he will only get a work permit upon entry when he shows his visa approval letter to the immigration officer. Every ...


5

First, it would help if you told us where you permanently reside. Indeed, if you are from the Quebec province, there is an agreement between the RAMQ (medical insurance in Quebec) and the French Sécurité Sociale. If you are from somewhere else, you might still find some insurances covering for more than a year. I found Bon Voyage, Desjardins (but they say ...


4

I've obtained several distinct work visas in Germany, all were post arrival visas. I'm an American citizen, who visited as a visiting professor, but I thought most visa waiver partners qualify under most jobs that grant work visas. You might find other German speaking or Scandinavian countries follow this rule as well, but always check with the consulate, ...


4

(Qualifier: I live in Japan ) This is common. Just ask at immigration for a regular visitor visa, explain that you want to use the WH later. Maybe put a post-it note over the WH visa and write まだ on it (means "not yet").


4

Getting a long-stay visa from Germany will not in itself allow you to travel in the other Schengen countries more than you would otherwise be allowed to. (Since you're Australian, you don't need a visa for short stays; if your nationality had been one that needs visas, the long-stay visa would effectively also function as a multiple-entry short-stay visa for ...


4

Most definitely. Each Working Holiday visa is an agreement between the country of your citizenship (Australia) and the country issuing the visa. Not all counties offer working holiday visas, and if they do, they don't offer them to every country either. When I was of working holiday visa age, I found Anyworkanywhere to be handy - I've set it to show the ...


4

It depends on the specific country, even countries that are part of the Schengen area haven't harmonised their policy in this area. For example, you can do that in Germany (using either your Japanese or your Australian passport) or in the Netherlands (only for Australians, Japanese citizens are not covered there) but not in France. There is in fact a Working ...


3

I was going to answer, but not being Australian apparently I can't ;) However I can at least look up some more details for you. The French Consulate in Sydney has a link that states 15 days at least. And judging by other visas I've applied for, I'd cynically expect that to be 15 working days. At least. As an aside, I'm annoyed I didn't use more youth ...



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