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41

I do exactly this, and have done so for the past five years. I am a software developer (previously web, now iOS) doing contract work for customers in a range of countries. I live in about five or six countries each year, spending anywhere from a week to several months in each. I've lived in Tokyo, Bangkok, Singapore, London, Rome, Prague, Sydney, Melbourne, ...


22

For most people trying what you propose, making money while traveling, is not possible. Luckily, there are plenty who prove this just a rule of thumb, not a hard law. Yes, it's possible to make enough money from a vlog, a blog, photography, professional articles or travel advice. But it's very hard to get started, and no real shortcuts to make it big. From ...


17

First of all, Saudi is a normal working environment. You can say it is different but surely it is normal :) Do not believe CNN or any western media regarding Saudi. They simply exaggerate things to the maximum which will give a bad first impression that will be stuck for a long time. People are touchy. Saudi men do shake hands all the time and it is ...


16

There is a term called digital nomad. This is someone who has no real home and is travelling and working using the internet. As a software developer you can do a lot of work independently using oDesk or any other freelancer web site. Chiang Mai, Thailand is called the Mecca of digital nomads. At least what I know it is inexpensive to get health insurance ...


15

Australia has fruit picking, which is commonly done by seasonal labour (a.k.a packpackers). The hours are long and the work hard, but our wages are high and most of the work is in Queensland, giving you access to some of the world's best rainforests and reefs, as well as the rest of Australia or NZ when you're ready to move on. You will need a working ...


15

You may want to try Coworking. That's a way to get a workplace and to meet like-minded people from all over the world, many of them freelancers. I am writing this, sitting in Coworking Las Palmas, which I found via deskwanted. Among my colleagues are other programmers (like me), a translator, a biologist (I believe), a serial entrepreneur, and architects. ...


15

Speaking from first-hand experience, I can say with certainty that YES, you CAN use the VWP in order to enter the US to attend a job interview, either for a job in the US or for a job outside of the US. A VWP is functionally equivalent to a B1/B2 visa (they often actually write B1 or B2 on the entry stamp to designate this!), and there are no other visas ...


13

I've been working on cruise ships for three years and I can say that getting a job on a cruise ship is not that hard. First of all let me tell you more on what is it to work on a cruise ship. If you want to be able to get off the ship while you are in port you have to consider one of the following positions: casino dealer/slot attendant/casino cashier ...


13

The Visa-Waiver Program, or VWP (which is what the ESTA relates to) allows you to enter the US for the purposes of Tourism or Business, but not for 'work'. The distinction here is really down to where you are paid. Presuming you are already working for this company, and being paid in the UK, then your visit to their US offices is classified as a "business" ...


13

Simple rule, if the employer's name was annotated in the visa page, then you should apply for another visa. If the employer's name was not annotated there, then you can use the same visa, just make sure to bring what proves your business. In general, the visa is issued to the person himself to conduct certain businesses (short training, meetings, ...


11

Backdoor Jobs is probably my favourite resource for out of the ordinary job adventures. It includes a variety of different jobs for different people with different backgrounds and experiences. A lot of the jobs listed are leading groups or hiking / trekking, BUT there are a lot of other ones available too. The owner / writer of the site Michael Landers ...


11

I always like finding public libraries when I travel, for different purposes. One of them is indeed to enjoy this free, accessible and quiet environment. They also have toilet, often a water source to refill your bottle, and they're warm (useful when you have a long bus connection in winter). Most libraries often offer free wifi to non-members, paid access ...


10

WWOOF (working on an organic farm). There some opportunities that are closer to "destinations" than others. One the piqued my interest was a community/organic farm near a Buddhist temple in Brazil. There was also an opportunity in Sao Carlos thats in the city, if rural areas are not for you Just rehashing an answer to a similar question by Ginamin


10

I used to live there, and would love to go back for a holiday at some point. One of the interesting things to note is that while it is generally warmer and drier than the UK (Port Stanley is around the same latitude south as London is north, but is partially sheltered by Andes, which strip a lot of the moisture out of the air) the water is much colder, as ...


10

Mostly if you're 18-30 you can get working holiday visa for Australia, New Zealand and Canada (the ones I know of). Citizens of many countries can get these visas but Dutch for sure. As mentioned in the comments, as a EU passport holder, you also have the right to work anywhere in the EU, in Switzerland and in EEA countries (Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein) ...


9

A common one for European students is Camp America and its ilk. They pay your airfare out to the camp, pay you a little bit while you're there (more if you've a handy skill like lifeguarding, first aid, teaching etc), and then after your time on camp you've the rest of the summer to enjoy the country. Teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) is another ...


9

According to the link in your question, you do seem to fit the requirements of a B-1 visa: If you apply for a B-1/B-2 visa, you must demonstrate to a consular officer that you qualify for a U.S. visa in accordance with the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). Section 214(b) of the INA presumes that every B-1/B-2 applicant is an intending ...


9

I knew someone who worked for Geeks without Borders, which from my understanding does indeed help small businesses in the developing world set up IT and the like, so there may indeed be room there for a business apps programmer.


9

May be Sixth Star is what you are looking for. In the referred page you can see what they offer (they literally say "We provide low cost cruises to experts and professionals in a wide range of areas" so these are not 24/7 works, so you can enjoy the rest of the cruise for a low fee). I have not experience with them, but a friend some years ago asked to join ...


9

Yes. From the US Embassy in Australia's website: Question: Can I travel to the United States on the Visa Waiver Program to find a job or attend interviews and then apply for the E-3 visa once I return to Australia? Answer: Yes, you can travel on the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) if you meet the requirements (please see our page on the Visa ...


8

Accommodation in Stanley includes numerous bed and breakfasts as well as a handful of hotels. You can have a look at weather conditions for the Falkland Islands on WolframAlpha. Several homestays are available in the main town of Stanley as well. Visa requirements will differ depending on what passport you have. However, you can look at this page, ...


8

In at least western Canada the thing to do is tree planting. Disagreeable but always in demand and used as a backup when you can't get a real job. There seem to be plenty of websites on the topic: Summit Reforestation TREE-PLANTER.COM A Tree Planter’s Reference Guide to Silviculture in Western Canada.


8

Tourist DESTINATIONS are among the ones that most need summer employees in places like Alaska. While taking a summer cruise, I was struck repeatedly by the fact that tourist towns typically reported populations of say, 1500 in the summer, and 500 in the winter. Local populations simply don't provide enough manpower to handle the tourist trade. That's ...


8

There is NAFTA, which if you are eligible makes it really easy to work in Canada as a US citizen. But the provisions in NAFTA don't apply to most people. "NAFTA applies to four specific categories of business people: business visitors, professionals, intra-company transferees, and traders and investors." "Professionals" is defined pretty narrowly; the ...


8

Contrary to the allegations of some other answers here, CBP (U.S. Customs and Border Protection) does not make up rules on the spot. Here is, quite literally, the letter of the law on who's allowed into the US and who's not: INA: ACT 212 - GENERAL CLASSES OF ALIENS INELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE VISAS AND INELIGIBLE FOR ADMISSION; WAIVERS OF INADMISSIBILLITY The ...


8

I have done some charity work with Camara, which has similar goals. Send 2nd hand computers to schools in Africa.


8

Freedom of movement for workers is one of the fundamental building stones of the EU and EU citizens don't need to get prior authorization to work elsewhere in the EU. In practice, some countries used to (and perhaps still do) deliver some form of residence “permit” but unlike non-EU citizens, you are entitled to get one (i.e. formally the permit just ...


8

The only requirement is that you leave Canada and re-enter. I did this myself for a Permanent Residence visa and I literally crossed over the Rainbow Bridge to the US, and turned round and came straight back. It's not a problem. (The conversation with the US immigration official was interesting. "What is your purpose in coming to the US? "To leave." "How ...


7

Searching for a job No you can most definitely not legally look for work while on a tourist visa. If any evidence is found that you are looking for a job you will be denied entry on arrival or could risk deportation at any time. Things that I've heard of US customs using to deny entry or deport travellers: art folios diary entries mentioning job offers ...


7

"Big ships" (e.g. cruise ships), have very specific needs. Your chances of getting a job with one of them soar if you can meet one of those needs. "Recreational sailor" probably doesn't "cut it" in this regard. Sailing ships need professionals. Most ships have computer and internet services. Your best shot may be at an IT role, but there may be more ...



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