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76

AT&T can't charge you to use WiFi. From the page you linked to, that's talking about a service where you connect to WiFi somewhere (like an airport) that you might normally have to pay for, and the provider of that WiFi has partnered with AT&T to allow AT&T customers to log in and use the WiFi. This does not affect your ability to connect to any ...


64

Do not worry, Wifi pass phrases for personal use should only be in printable ASCII characters, in other words English characters. They do not support Unicode or other codepages. For more details check the Wikipedia's Wi-Fi Protected Access page. Except if you are redirected to a webpage for authentication, that's a whole different story and Karlson's ...


29

For Android depending on the model of your phone you may have to add Russian Language to the available keyboards. I have Galaxy S5 and under Settings -> Languages and Input you should be able to do this from the Galaxy App Store. You should be able to do the same for the iPad just add a Russian Language, which will allow you to switch to it and make the ...


27

I am Russian and I never met a WiFi password in Cyrillic.


16

Here is a clear case of the representative being asked a question they don't know the answer to. As others have pointed out, their training is minimal. They are not allowed to admit not knowing except in very extreme cases as that would be bad for the corporate image. If they say "It will be free" and is wrong, the customer (you) will be very very angry ...


8

I can verify that the N700a trains have power sockets for the seats at the ends of the cars. Look at the bottom of the side wall under the window near your feet. Plugged in right now, actually :-)


8

I traveled in Russia in 2011 with a tablet, smartphone, Vita etc. Every WiFi network was in Latin characters. As with most nations they try to be somewhat accommodating to tourists and English is a good baseline, even for people on holiday from other parts of Europe.


8

I've been living in Russia for 3 years, lived in various hostels and hotels, but I never saw a Wi-Fi with a cyrillic password anywhere. I'm not even sure that it's technically possible.


7

The amount of free wifi in Israel is ridiculous. Egged buses have it most of the time. Gas stations (at least Paz and Dor Alon) have it. Tel Aviv has municipial wifi. The list is endless. I had the good luck to never need a password. Others might have a different experience, I guess this differs from place to place.


6

The video on demand is served from an onboard media server and is not using any of the available bandwith of the in many cases very slow internet connection available on flights.


5

I have been to Russia. Once I was hosted by a friend in Moscow. He said I could use the wifi. He gave me the password. Accessing to his wifi was just like anywhere else on the planet. Here i show you a ticket of a Cafetería in Moscow called Costa Coffee where they specify the login and password to access their wifi. As you can see, it is in latin alphabet. ...


5

So, here I gather a few names mentioned in the web pages listed in the resources below: kismetbali.com: a cafe/restaurant/shop providing fast internet, see on the website `Finding fast internet in Ubud has been quite a challenge. We pay top dollar to provide our customers with fastest Fiber Optic available in the region. Uploads or Downloads its ...


5

I live in Lynchburg, Virginia but drive up 29 often enough (in the bottom right of the box, and most of that area is apparently in the silent zone. The only things I've noticed are FM radio stations tend to fade more in that region and my phone never seems to work, but the roads are sort of embedded in the hills so this would seemingly be the case ...


4

Big malls have free WiFi for sure. The Dubai Mall offers it free of registration, while Mall of the Emirates require a simple registration - the password will be sent to your phone with a SMS. The hotel where I was staying had free WiFi in the hall. If you really need internet I suggest to get a SIM card from local company Du (Emirates Integrated ...


4

Most Wifi Upload Speeds Are Probably Less Than 5Mbps It looks like most terrestrial ISPs in Bali are using legacy copper (ie. repurposed telephone and coaxial TV cables). The highest upload speed you'll achieve at any single site served by legacy copper is most likely limited to 5Mbps. The 5 Mbps upload speed limitation is inherent to most legacy copper ...


4

in Tel Aviv ,Jerusalem and Haifa you have free Wifi provided by municipality. Their speed are not greatest but you can download your mails and chat on your whatsapp, also most of the coffees has usually free wifi for clients.


3

eConnect is one company that I used when I was in Japan that I know has that, and they use NTT Docomo network. (it's specified under network if you go to the prepaid SIM page). I went to very isolated areas in Hokkaidō and it worked fine


3

In the big cities, there is a sufficient number of trendy cafes and restaurants, not just aimed at tourists, that offer free wifi. But, most 'regular' joints, targeting Colombians, won't have wifi. So, if you only occasionally need to be online, you're probably good to go. If you need to be able to go online when you want to, you should look into a local ...


3

How about Coworking Salzburg? They rent coworking space for as little as 25EUR (as of writing), including a desk, power outlets and Wi-Fi. The location is not exactly central, but to be fair coworking spaces rarely are.


3

According to this blog entry (screenshots of the signup page available), the prices are: For Laptops 20MB for $10 USD 50MB for $18 USD Full Flight for $22 For Mobile 12MB for $5 USD 5MB for $2 USD 3 Hours for $10 USD It is worth mentioning that the blog owner had a bad experience using the onboard wifi as most of the requests were timed out and ...


3

For online resources, this Japanese page has a list. The train names might survive Google or other machine-translations.


3

The E5 and E6 series used in northern Japan (Tohoku Shinkansen; Komachi, Hayabusa, some Hayate) have a pair of 100V outlets for the front row of each car, and a single outlet beneath the window on the other rows on each side. Note that since the seats rotate, there are also two outlets behind the back row of each car, although they would be inconvenient to ...


3

I lived in that zone for three years (1993-1996), and I have traveled in it several times more recently, but this is the first I have ever heard of its existence. How did you even become aware of it? I lived in Lexington, VA, and my travels have been mainly on the Blue Ridge and in the Shenandoah and James River valleys. I can't speak for areas closer to ...


3

At the very least, Air China does (source). China Eastern has also started - for both domestic AND international flights. A summary article on this notes that Hainan Air is also introducing it in China as well.


2

Wifi can be found fairly widely, the big problem though is that almost all of them need a UAE mobile number to receive your login details. Non-UAE numbers aren't accepted. Login pages often look like this, with the UAE restriction: Assuming you do have a UAE number (/get one), then you can find wifi at most of the main metro stations, tram stops, various ...


2

In addition to the answer by Alessandro, I like to add that (at least in spring 2014) the registration in the Mall of the Emirates used to require a LOCAL telephone number. This can be quite a problem for tourists. If you are willing to pay for wifi, there are multiple options in Dubai, using credit card or skpe.


2

About cafes and such: A generally valid answer if a cafe has outlets near the tables won´t be possible, but nobody will have a problem if you just ask. More than "yes, there and there" or "no" won´t happen. This site lists some cafes, restaurants etc. with free WIFI: Afro Cafe, Bürgerspitalplatz 5 Altstadt Hotel Garni Trumer Stube, Bergstraße 6 ...


2

Sitting on a Kodama now and can't find any unfortunately, for future reference.


2

Just buy a colombian prepaid simcard. Major carriers (Claro, Movistar or Tigo). I have used Movistar and Tigo, and I could recommend movistar. It has LTE, and the coverage and signal strength are good. Movistar offers 7 (US $4.50) and 30 days plans (US $ 13), so is the cheaper and most convenient option here.


2

Unless you have a phone the manufacturer of which has partnered with AT&T to only allow you to use Wi-Fi if you paid a ransom to AT&T (which would be very, very, very, surprising, and would most certainly only be the case for an AT&T-branded phone), as others have said, you are free to connect to any Wi-Fi network you like, and the "package" is ...



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