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26

Pretty darn safe. Most terrorism or problems in those countries is on the ground. Yes some people might have SAMs (surface to air missiles) but the odds of them even seeing you at 800km/hr+ and 33000ft+ and hitting getting you is not worth considering. They wouldn't waste their weaponry trying. When a place is considered too dangerous to fly, there are ...


17

Re the borders, Jordanian border is the quietest one (taking the honor from the Egyptian & Syrian borders, which now have some potential for danger given the instability there). During the war of 2006 in Israel, land borders with Jordan and Egypt were open and unaffected. Land borders with Syria and Lebanon are only open for the UN personnel and Syrian ...


12

You can cross the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi-Zakho and travel throughout Kurdish Iraq without any problems. In the past (before 2008), the border was a bit more difficult as the Turks and Iraqi border guards were much more suspicious of non-locals crossing, but now they don't even look twice. You'll get a 10-day visa on arrival at the border although it ...


10

In July I was in Tajikistan, along the Afghanistan border. I met a LOT of travellers going there. Indeed, the Central Asia Lonely Planet (English version) has a picture of a temple from within Afghanistan. It was sooo tempting. However, due to a slight medical emergency, I had to backtrack from Khorog along the Afghanistan border again to Dushanbe and ...


10

The situation is very complicated. Georgia says that Abkhazia and South Ossetia are Georgian territories, and you can go there from Georgia by this border crossing: to South Ossetia from Gori - my friends from Germany made a trip this year. If you get into these territories not by these points, you would get problems (fee from $1200 or jail up to 5 ...


10

Chris Guillebeau, author of The Art of Non-Conformity blog, has an article on how he managed to get there.


10

I imagine it would depend almost entirely on the wording in the PDS. If the insurer uses a term like "war zone" they should be defining it somewhere. Otherwise, contact them for clarification on the specific regions you're travelling too. That said, none of the insurers I've looked at use the term. They only talk about harm caused by war or military ...


9

I've been there a few years ago so I don't really know how recent facts affected the safety of that area but since it has always been a "conflict zone" I'll give you my two cents. Jerusalem isn't considered to be in the West Bank. Fully equipped Israeli soldiers are deployed everywhere in the city as are security cameras. It's a very sensitive area but I've ...


8

In your particular example, there are a number of international organizations in that area, like the Arab League, the CCASG and the OPEC, which have the UAE as a member. Even if Iran would suddenly start to become as aggresive as North Korea and threaten to shoot down aircraft entering their region, the political and economical repercussions of actually ...


8

I have flown into Kabul on a passenger jet, in 2008. The protocol is very simple - the pilot isn't concerned for several reasons: If you are landing, as I was, you are going to be landing at night, because that's when they schedule them. Until they descend below 20,000 feet, you are out of the range of a SAM. Typically, they need to be within 4 miles of ...


7

It is possible to go to Iraq. Business people travel there regularly, although they normally travel with security. There's a pretty good summary of the area here. Kurdistan seems to be one of the more stable areas, and the border with Iran seems to be pretty scary. I would be afraid to travel in Iraq, but then I'm also afraid to go to Colombia, which is ...


5

I would say that each company insurance can probably have their own definition. It is usually part of the policy (in the definitions' portion). Otherwise, it is probably regulated by the jurisdiction where the insurance company is incorporated, which again - may result in a whole bunch of different definitions. Bottom line - I would look in the policy for ...


4

I think looking at your country's safe-fly list is a good indicator. For Australians we have Smart Traveller, where you can see the classification of each country. I'd think that Australian travel insurance companies use that to help determine the danger of travelling to a specific place, and I'd imagine your country would have something similar.


4

The key point is that it's exceedingly unlikely for all of Turkey to get slapped with an "avoid all travel" advisory, but I'll answer anyway for posterity. One by one: Airlines can choose where they fly irrespective of travel advisories, and there are commercial flights to places like Baghdad and Mogadishu that no sane voluntary traveller goes to. So, ...


3

I don't think there's any problem with this at all. Iran and Pakistan are not currently at war with anyone, the security situation is quite safe in both, and commercial airlines service those countries daily. Afghanistan has been in an effective state of civil war since the departure of US forces, with a weak central government. However, it's unlikely any ...


3

I tried to get into South Ossetia from Gori, in May 2008. Less than 3 months Before the 5-day-war. When I got to the checkpoint on the Georgian side, the military asked me what I was doing there "Do you know there is a war going on here" he said. Well he was right - 2 month later. So I would like to say. No way you can get into Soth Ossetia from Gori today. ...


2

I'm currently living in Bethlehem in West Bank (for three months), I'm Spanish. It is safe if you are tourist and don't go to demonstrations or activist events. Israeli security forces will make you a lot of questions in the Ben Gurion airport (or in the airport in your country) about your visit for "security reasons" and maybe some will be private (of ...


1

As far as overflying unstable primitive tribal lands like Afghanistan and Pakistan goes, the only worry I'd have is a major mechanical malfunction (not a shoot-down) forcing an airliner to land somewhere in those lands, and being taken hostage. Considering the lack of suitable runways and ATC, it's unlikely that you'd end up surviving the landing anyway. ...



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