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10

Take a look at http://www.claudiocorallo.com/ His story is amazing, and he is probably one of the best cacao producers in the world. They do the whole growing of cacao to sell and they produce their own chocolate also. I know of a friend that went to Claudios farm in S. Tome e Principe and they have a guided tour where they explain the whole process of ...


9

I've moved countries a lot, doing contracts. One of the finest resources that I've found is meetup.com You sign up, give your city, and your interests, and it starts suggesting social groups and events for you! I've used it to meet people and try new things when I lived in Vancouver, and now here in Melbourne, Australia. We can't tell you what to do ...


8

WorldWide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) is the only way I know of to stay for free somewhere other than couch surfing. This might be what the Romanian you met used. I'm not familiar with Korea's program specifically, and all WWOOF farms vary depending on the host, but they may be able to help you arrange free accommodations and meals in exchange for ...


8

If you are really on the lookout for cacao and chocolate form start to finish, Chuao in Venezuela is the place to go. They do not have an official 'assist on the plantation' arrangement, but local life revolves around the process, and you will certainly be able to see every part of it, and taste the products at various stages. In my opinion, the BEST ...


8

I only have a partial answer. If you are in Europe and you lack the funds, a substitute for the sensation of chocolate and cacao can be found in the Chocolate museum (DE) in Cologne, Germany. They actually have a greenhouse with cacao trees. Although you will not be allowed to pick them. You can also go to Suriname. There is no commercial plantation ...


8

Yes, there are tons of places where you can do that, since those sites are chronically understaffed. To give you an example of this, the Xi'an Terracotta army is staffed with less than 20 archeologists. Despite being dug out less than 10 percent. Admittedly it will be difficult in China to join in, but there are dozens of better opportunities. There is a ...


5

Working on a cruise ship is about as different from going on a cruise as it's possible to be. Crew cabins are small, windowless, and typically shared - on some ships they are shared with more crew than there are beds, working and sleeping in shifts. Crew are not allowed in guest areas even on their time off - there are crew bars and such further down in the ...


5

Yes. You are allowed to do vrijwilligerswerk, as it is called in Dutch, if you have a legal permit to be there. One exception is when you are awaiting a decision as to your status. This site contains Dutch-language information on the topic. Google Translate may be your friend. However, you might need to be careful with insurances: See here. I don't know ...


5

Depends on what your technical skills are. Telecoms geeks should beeline for Télécoms Sans Frontières , while IT folks are spoiled for choice: Wikipedia has an entire category listing them. Larger outfits like Mercy Corps also have opportunities for IT people.


5

I might do my volunteering AFTER I arrived at my target city. And then walk in to the site of my choice. The director of an institution has a choice of two volunteers, both of whom are foreign, and speaks English better than the local language: Someone who has called or emailed him or her, leaving a message, or someone who's sitting in front of him/her, and ...


4

I find googling often yields annoying companies that want to charge you to volunteer. However someone gave me this resource for South America that is amazingly detailed and covers just about every option or country you could think of in that area of the world. Hope it's of interest / benefit: http://www.volunteersouthamerica.net/


4

You're not specifying where you are going. If known, it would make giving you pointers much easier. Also, two months for helping out as a software engineer is awfully short; by the time you can start getting something done, it's time to move on. That said, here are two websites you might want to check out (spam filter prevents me from posting more): ...


4

There's a fine line indeed on whether 'voluntourism' is good or bad. There have been cases where so-called volunteering organisations run for-profit enterprises which exploit, say, orphanages under the guise of doing good. One of the best guides I've read while doing my own research into such opportunities is by Ethical Volunteering who have published a ...


3

If you are working for a non profit organization make sure you fill this form and make sure you comply with the rules mentioned and you have no conflicts with them.They are The imports by charitable institutions would be required to fulfill the following conditions to be eligible for ad-hoc exemption from customs duty: (a) The imports ...


3

You have to figure out first which helping organizations still accept volunteers. This is compiled on this page (google translation) (in the table 1/3rds down the page). The primary challenge might be that you will have to provide transport and housing yourself in many cases. The minimum I would prepare is an international drivers license and a sleeping ...


3

The Ethical Volunteering website appears dormant, and email to them bounces back saying the mailbox is full. The guide is of course still valid and useful. A particular tour provider mentioned on the EV website is a founding member of something called Fair Trade Volunteering which seems like an excellent initiative. One way of evaluating an opportunity might ...


3

Volunteer HQ is a reputable company. Their program fees are also cheaper than STA's. If you're traveling for a few months, Try VSO. They're looking for professionals and will even pay a living allowance and other costs.


3

I'm afraid you'll have to learn Korean first! From Jeju's 'endangered' dialect article from The Jeju Weekly : An after-school program for learning the dialect is offered in a couple of public schools. This suggests that it should be possible. The article even mentions an iPhone app about the Jeju language, but I didn't find it. The Jeju Special ...


3

This question is difficult to answer. Some of the organizations also use the opportunity to raise funds. IN many cases volunteering might actually cost you more then a "a luxury lying-around-in-a-resort vacation". From a organizations perspective having strangers volunteering provides risks. Who is responsible if something goes wrong, what if a the person ...


2

I never used them but I know a few people who always stayed in a Jjimjilbang while travelling in Korea. They're not free but they're usually pretty cheap. Edit: I jumped the gun with this answer. It doesn't really suit your purpose but it could be useful for someone looking for a cheap night in Seoul or Busan.


2

If you're expecting a volunteering organisation to pay for your airfare too, that's is going to be very unlikely unless you're highly skilled in aspects of relief work such as a degree in medicine or mechanical / civil engineering. Most volunteering work that has a 'tourism' / experience component in it often indeed asks for you to pay for your expenses. In ...


2

I was actually going to suggest Bankers Without Borders by Grameen. Since you liked volunteering with that organization, why not go with them again to another country?


2

You'll need a Visa and a yellow card showing you've been immunized against yellow fever. Any pharmacy should be able to provide you with the yellow cards but you'll need to ask. The CDC recommends additional vaccinations against Hepatitis A, Malaria and Typhoid. More info: http://www.ghanaembassy.org/index.php?page=visas


2

Your question touches upon a much more fundamental issue, which is the actual objectively measurable benefit of development aid. Many conservatives and plenty of those having worked in development for extended periods of time seriously question the potential impact of development aid. The former out of principle, the latter through personal experience. And, ...


2

Just wanted to send your way some info on a medieval dig going in France in Summer of 2014. You can read more on it here: http://www.chateaudeleymonie.org/vacations.htm


1

First make sure that you have some kind of proof that you are here to volunteer at a non-profit. If you are arriving at the MUMBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. If you put all the laptops in checked in luggage 99 percent they wont put the bag in screening as they only put the handbags in the machine for screening. And if by chance they say you to put the Luggage ...


1

I am not 100% sure about the Organic side of things but I've heard that ProjectsAbroad has this kind of things popping up now and then. At WorkAway they at least have some organic stuff going on in Portugal. More extensive search might reveal opportunities elsewhere. I know of Portugal because I've searched for that myself. Never been in contact with anyone ...


1

Check this page http://ubelong.org/ You will find a lot of possibilities


1

DIVOG (Disaster Volunteers of Ghana) seems to have some good volunteer programs in Ghana. I have not personally travelled with DIVOG, but I found this site through a photographer that took his family on one of the family volunteer programs with them. A blog entry of photos from his trip is here: http://marksolonfstop.com/2013/01/05/dzolo-gbogame-ghana/ ...


1

You're not mentioning where you are going, specifically. Websites like what you are searching for do exist, for some regions and locations, but focus on that region or location only. So, where are you going? Also, as has been pointed out, you're typically much better off, looking for a volunteer position after you've arrived at your destination. ...



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