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8

In the past, it was fairly common to do "border runs" - when your 90 days were up as a backpacker, you'd exit the country for a few hours, and come right back in. I met many people doing this in most South American countries. In the past, the common way would be to do a border run. Head over from Foz Iguazu to Iguazu, spend the day checking out the falls, ...


6

A tourist in Brazil can stay for a maximum of 90 consecutive days, extendable to 180 days every one year by issuing a request at the Federal Police Department (DPF). That's not automatic; you must go to the nearest Federal Police office and fill a form and pay a fee (currently R$ 67.00 or US$ 30.70). Be prepared to present them the usual information you need ...


5

As a US passport holder, you're "visa-exempt" and will generally be granted 90 days on arrival, no questions asked: The nationals of the following countries are eligible for the visa exemption program, which permits a duration of stay up to 90 days: ... U.S.A. ... Now, making a quick visit to another country for the sole purpose of renewing your ...


4

Timatic is generally considered the definitive reference for Visas. It's what most travel agents use when booking tickets, and what most airlines use when verifying you have the correct visa before boarding. In general Timatic isn't free, however a number of websites do allow free access to it, such as Star Alliance and Gulf Air. You can use either of these ...


4

I've always found http://www.projectvisa.com/ to be a very helpful resource as it gives you a really quick way to check visa requirements and then you can verify it against one of the links (typically to the countries Foreign Affairs website). While travelling I've noticed that few people seem to know about this site because it pretty much never shows up on ...



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