New answers tagged

1

Let's ask Timatic, because that's what your airline will do when they decide whether you need a visa before they let you fly: Visa required, except for Passengers with a visa issued by Australia, Canada, New Zealand or USA to nationals of India, only if in transit through Korea (Rep.): For details, click here There is a another special exemption ...


4

In this scenario it might have been best to get a D-4 visa since you are learning Korean at Seoul. I'm not too sure if it is a D-4 so you should ask your local Korean embassy for clarification. (Full link) http://www.studyinkorea.go.kr/en/sub/overseas_info/guide/guide_visa.do Visa for General Training (D-4): For persons who study Korean at a university-...


9

As far as the EU treaties are concerned, the referendum does not cause a Brexit. To cause a Brexit, the PM has to officially inform the other EU members that the UK is leaving. This notification may be several weeks or months in the future. The two-year period mentioned later starts at that point. With this notification, the official negotiations on the ...


0

TLDR It is too early to tell if anything at all will be affected; since the referendum is just a notification of the will of the people. It is up to the government to act on it and initiate proceedings. If the UK does proceed with the legal process of divorcing from the EU, it may be able to negotiate separate agreements that can have an impact on the ...


1

Unless there are emergency-related circumstances, you cannot extend a visa-free stay in Schengen. Do visit the Comisaría General de Extranjería though and explain your situation, it doesn't hurt to try.


24

Update 2 July 2016 What a lot of people are interested in now has a name: "domestic disentanglement from EU law". The House of Lords has added a briefing to their library... Repealing and Reviewing Domestic Legislation—As part of the process of leaving the EU, decisions would need to be made about how to deal with existing domestic legislation ...


15

Nothing for quite some time. No law has changed. This was merely a non-binding referendum. Presumably the executive will agree with the people and Article 50 will be triggered by the PM, but even then, this is the first time it's ever happened so 1) it'll take a couple of years to sort out and 2) people aren't exactly sure how it'll happen. As a result -...


75

As of today, no. Nothing has currently changed (other than currency prices, which are of interest to international travelers). There will be a prolonged negotiating period over the next several years (specifically, two years after Article 50 is invoked unless a different agreement is reached), and immigration controls will inevitably be a large part of ...


2

No, there is no scenario in which some sort of Georgian permit or visa opens any special access to the Schengen area. It is true that Georgia grants visa-free access to Schengen visa holders, but it only goes one way, Schengen countries do not recognize Georgian visas.



Top 50 recent answers are included