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75

As of today, no. Nothing has currently changed (other than currency prices, which are of interest to international travelers). There will be a prolonged negotiating period over the next several years (specifically, two years after Article 50 is invoked unless a different agreement is reached), and immigration controls will inevitably be a large part of ...


23

Update 28 June 2016 The House of Commons has admitted a research paper to their library: "Leaving the EU: How might people currently exercising free movement rights be affected?" On the 24th of June this paper was admitted: "Brexit: what happens next?" Now that the UK has voted to leave the EU, what will happen next? This Commons Library briefing ...


15

There's several approaches you can take. They all involve some planning, and there are some extra marks of caution. Mix Schengen and non-schengen stays. The actual Schengen rules say for any given day in the Schengen area, you must have spent less than 90 out of the 180 preceeding days in the Schengen area. The EU even provides a calculator to help with ...


15

Nothing for quite some time. No law has changed. This was merely a non-binding referendum. Presumably the executive will agree with the people and Article 50 will be triggered by the PM, but even then, this is the first time it's ever happened so 1) it'll take a couple of years to sort out and 2) people aren't exactly sure how it'll happen. As a result -...


14

This is a literal, rather than idiomatic, translation. In Russian the text is "белым списком шенгена" which is probably better translated as "Schengen whitelist". This seems to be referring to countries whose nationals do not require a visa to travel to countries in the Schengen area, as this is what is happening for Ukraine, but neither this term or the ...


10

If you plan to "operate" your business over the phone, you might actually be working in Europe. That's not what a tourist does. There could be tax consequences, both home and abroad. If you can refrain from working on your business on your holiday, options might be: Apply for D visa for France or Italy, then only time in other countries counts against the ...


9

The short answer is no, you cannot stay for 100 days using the ESTA and the Visa Waiver Program. You will have to apply for a visa or change your travel plans. The longer answer involves clearing up a lot of misunderstandings - primarily about what an ESTA (and the related VWP) is. See this question for a full description. The ESTA does not allow you to ...


9

As far as the EU treaties are concerned, the referendum does not cause a Brexit. To cause a Brexit, the PM has to officially inform the other EU members that the UK is leaving. This notification may be several weeks or months in the future. The two-year period mentioned later starts at that point. With this notification, the official negotiations on the ...


8

If you ignore the semantics of "Visa" v's "pre-approved Visa-like thing", then Australia is generally no different (or frequently better) than many other major countries. For example, comparing Australia, the US, and Canada (based on their new regulations starting March 15, 2016). Citizens allowed without any form of pre-approval : Australia - 1 ...


7

I'll give you some of my personal experience as a white American citizen living in France on a long-stay working Visa. Standard disclaimers apply, and this isn't legal advice. Firstly, I wouldn't worry too much about border checks coming into France, and not at all while traveling in the Schengen area after you have already entered the country. Border ...


6

Here's the actual legal basis for visa-free travel: http://base.garant.ru/195505 . It says you can stay for 72 hours, have to leave by the same port where you entered, and most importantly (point #6) it says you may only be located on the territory declared in the "official tourist program" filed by your cruise line with the Russian government. There may be ...


5

There are two aspects to the question: EU countries are extremely unlikely to put specific restrictions on entry by dual citizens. It's never been done nor discussed and would raise many questions. There is a general difference in philosophy at play here, US authorities routinely look at the country of birth for many purposes (e.g. security clearances) ...


5

EU-Bürger müssen sich bei einem Aufenthalt von bis zu 90 Tagen nicht mehr bei den örtlichen Behörden registrieren lassen. source: http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/DE/Laenderinformationen/00-SiHi/Nodes/KroatienSicherheit_node.html#doc358506bodyText4 translation: EU citizens no longer have to register locally during a stay (in Croatia) of up to 90 days.


4

This is not a transit through Shanghai. The Chinese authorities will only care about where your flight to Shanghai originated, and, where your flight out of Shanghai ends. As you clearly have seen, the country you are arriving from must be different than the one you are going to. Since your itinerary has you arriving from and departing to the same country, ...


4

Generally speaking, it's not possible for people who don't need a short-stay visa to get one, that's not how Schengen visas work (unlike the UK or US for example, where you can apply for a visa for various reasons even if your citizenship qualifies you for the Visa Waiver Program or you're not a visa national). So the French consulate should not give you a ...


4

As a national of Jordan, you do need a visa to enter Serbia. There is no provision for visa on arrival; you will need to obtain one in advance. However, you can enter visa-free if you also hold a visa or residence permit from a Schengen country, the UK or the USA.


4

It doesn't matter what you wrote on the form - what matters is what was put in your passport. If you check the stamp you got at entry it will say how long you are allowed stay in the country. For example, a few weeks ago I entered Singapore intending to stay for 1 night, so I put either 1 or 2 days on the form (I don't recall which), however on my passport ...


3

I have been in the same situation in the past, declaring some length of stay on the paper I filled when entering the country and changing my mind, staying longer than expected and leaving way later. I could leave the country without an issue and when reentering (through a land border, though I doubt it changes anything), I had "troubles", but not so much ...


3

Remember one thing: if you entered Kosovo from anywhere other than Serbia, you can NOT cross from Kosovo to Serbia during the same visit. You need to go to Macedonia or Montenegro and enter Serbia from there


3

Until when can they (US citizens) be sure they'll be able to enter the EU without a visa? That is unfortunately impossible to say. If the EU decides to suspend visa free travel to the Schengen area for US citizens, the date of effect must be 'within 90 days' of the publication of the decision (Regulation (EU) No 1289/2013, Article 1(f)). It can neither ...


3

You can probably glean a list of the countries from this map on Wikipedia regarding Visa Free entry for all EU citizens (or go through the big table on the associated webpage). map: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_requirements_for_European_Union_citizens#/media/File:Visa_requirements_for_the_European_Union_citizens.png webpage: https://en.wikipedia.org/...


3

It simply means that the governments of the two countries haven't arranged this yet. Often visa-free is bilateral - especially when done with a trade deal, but sometimes not. For example, Aussies can get a tourist visa for the UK on arrival, but UK citizens need one (an ETA) in advance to visit Australia! (at least, last I checked). By default, most ...


3

The 180 day calculation is on the basis of a sliding window. First, ignore any days when you were in Germany on your German residence permit. Then, for each day you're in the Schengen area, look at the 179 preceding days. If you were in the Schengen area for more than 89 of those days, you've been in the Schengen area too long. Therefore, assuming your ...


2

This is addressed in Paragraph 20A of the rules, which says... Leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom will usually lapse on the holder going to a country or territory outside the common travel area. However, under article 13 of the Immigration (Leave to Enter and Remain) Order 2000 such leave will not lapse where it was given for a period ...


2

The scheme for Iranians to visit Georgia visa-free was cancelled on the 2nd July 2013. Unless they qualify for an exemption, Iranian citizens now need a visa (which can be obtained online). This arose from two issues: First, the USA suggesting to Georgia that they should not let Iranians come into the country so easily; and second, Georgia's long-term desire ...


2

It's possible, but they're VERY strict on it. I've had a few friends do this, and one was deported and the other given a strict warning and told not to do it again. Essentially, if you're working there, leave and come back in, all signs are that you're trying to go back to your job, potentially illegally. So you'll need to assure them that you're not doing ...


2

I went from Heksinki to St Petersburg with my family and it was amazing - the ship just slid across - I didn't feel a wave - amazing food also - it seemed to take exactly 12 hours from 6 pm to 6am.All the Visa stuff was organised by the shipping company and a small tour bus for only English speakers met us and was driven by Ivan (surprise surprise !!) and ...


2

In Australia travellers that hold E.U. passport and other Country that you can find in that link https://www.eta-au.com/eta/ do not need a real visa but just an easy for to fill up . Most of the restriction are due to that the Autralian government try to limit as much as possible the immigration .


2

When I was moved to Hong Kong, they required me to "exit" the country so that I can close my "tourist visa" and enter back in on a "work visa," which allowed me to stay in the country for longer than the allotted time for a tourist.


2

I can find many - different - sources - that - Qeshm - is - visa-free for up to 14 days visits. All of those sources by themselves look kind of fishy and I would not trust a visa issue on them, but seen together and given that such reputable sources as the airport of Qeshm and the Iranian News Agency are among them, I am almost convinced. Apparently ...



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