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12

This page has more details on your situation as a non-EU family member of an EU national: http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=463&langId=en Most importantly it clarifies that you'll have the right to live, work and get educated in the country your mother lives and works in, not the entire EU. And it will probably require copious amounts of ...


9

The Canadian Government provides a questionnaire to determine which possibilities you have to visit Canada and if a visa is required. In addition to your citizenship, there are a few other issues which may be relevant to determine the requirements, e.g. country of residence, any relationship with Canadian citizens, age or any previous permanent residence in ...


8

You don't need a visa if you stay up to 30 days in Mongolia. From Mongolian Ministry of foreign affairs: Within the framework of the 100 days of the intensification of economy the Government of Mongolia approved a list of 42 countries with a visa free access to Mongolia. According to this decision nationals of these countries are entitled with the ...


5

My understanding is that St. Peter is the only currently operating scheduled operator, although there are irregular visits by the usual suspects (P&O, Princess etc). Russian immigration rules are notoriously opaque, but my understanding is as follows: The 72-hour visa-free entry is only available if booked as part of a package, stays over 24 hours ...


5

Reading the letter of the law in that article, you should be fine, because entry and entry clearance are not the same thing. However, in practical terms this piece of hair-splitting may not help you much, as when you go to clear immigration they will pull your record and see that you've been denied a visa in the past, and assess your case for entry ...


5

Wikipedia's list of Visa requirements for X citizens articles is surprisingly comprehensive and up to date. It's not perfect or complete, and it's definitely better for nationalities that are heavily represented among the editorship, but if you happen to come from any large-ish English-speaking country you're gold. Obviously you'll want to double-check any ...


5

If you are under 21 or have a proof that your are dependent on your mother, you can work or live in an EU country where your mother lives. But if you keep living in a non-EU country, you will still need a visa to travel to an EU country, since you are Turkish citizen.


4

I am not too sure about the “despite colonization” bit. I can't really see a pattern, one way or the other. Some ex-British colonies offer visas on arrival for British citizens (e.g. Kenya), some don't (e.g. India) and most treat German or French citizens in exactly the same way. And then for some reason, Luxembourgish and Finnish citizenships – but not ...


4

First of all, want to note that @jpatokal is right and St. Peter line is really the only operator who serves the ships directly to St.Petersburg - please, review my old answer here: Are there currently any international ferries that travel to Saint Petersburg, Russia? Main principle for this kind of journey is that local authorities must know where are you ...


3

Details are complex and partly off-topic for this site but understanding the logic behind EU law might help. Basically, you don't have any direct rights, only your mother does. That said, a person's right of free movement in the EU also entails e.g. traveling or moving to another EU country with their non-EU spouse or dependents. But the idea is that ...


3

The best lists I know of are on Wikipedia, they cover more subtleties than just "visa-free" but they are unfortunately not 100% complete probably because 300 some citizenships multiples by 300 some countries to visit would result in 90,000 entries to get right and maintain. Sometimes you don't need a visa at all, sometimes you don't need a visa but you need ...


2

Since you are (apparently) not married, I'm afraid that he is in the same situation as if he was a random Ecuadorian national with his residence in Spain, which means he will need a visa (per the UK Border Agency's website). As far as the law is concerned, neither you nor your relatives are his “family” so it really doesn't matter that you are traveling ...


2

No, he would have to get a tourist visa.


2

The legal answer, as you've already found out, is "no": 4、Are the foreign visitors who completed 72-hour visa-free transit procedures and entered into China permitted to leave Beijing to other Chinese cities? 72-hour visa-free transit foreign visitors are not permitted to leave Beijing to other Chinese cities during their 72-hour visa-free ...


2

If you need a visa when flying, you will also need a visa when arriving on a boat. In most cases, it does not matter at all how you enter the country. While there are exceptions, as the comments suggest, these are usually only to make things easier or harder for common cases. Minor Iraqis travelling from UAE to Ireland on a boat are surely not that common, ...


2

No, you cannot enter the Schengen area only with a UK residence permit if you citizenship does not allow you to visit without a visa. A possibly source for the confusion is that a residence permit from a Schengen country (including most EU countries but not the UK) does allow the holder to visit other Schengen countries without visa. Another source for the ...


2

Your UK work permit is not valid to enter the Schengen area, also for short time. The exception for non-UE nationals living in UK is to hold a UK residence permit indicating "family member of an EU citizen".


2

Mongolia has a visa-free policy for selected countries until 31 December 2015. http://www.mfa.gov.mn/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3446%3A42-&catid=43%3A2009-12-20-21-55-03&Itemid=62&lang=en


2

Agreements tend to be reciprocal (although I would not be surprised if some weren't) but many countries also simply decide unilaterally to grant visa-free entry to citizens of other countries. You don't need an agreement for that. For example, compare the visa policy of Haiti (certainly a very open country, on paper) and requirements for Haitian citizens. ...


1

This is really borderline. The English in that article you link to is not great, and I would check with the embassy, but my feeling is that what you propose might be technically OK, but it pretty clearly violates the spirit of the rules. So the basic problem is in the name of the article you link to: No-Visa Entry Policy for Foreigners in Transit That ...


1

You won't get a visa on arrival in the UK but as US citizen you generally don't need a visa. In all likelihood, you won't be asked to show anything but in theory you are supposed to bring the same things that you would need to apply for visa (bank statement, itinerary, etc.). Details are available on gov.uk


1

None of this is possible. It appears to be a description of the UK system but the Schengen area does not work that way. Generally speaking, Indian citizens need a visa in Germany even if they are merely transiting airside but your UK visa should exempt you of that requirement (see Do I need a visa to transit in the Schengen area?). It will not be possible ...


1

In the US, being in transit does not exempt you from any potential visa requirement, you need to have the right to enter the country, see Do I need a US visa to change planes in an American airport? Also, while there have been discussions about participation in the visa waiver program for many years, Poland is still not eligible so that Polish citizens do ...


1

You are an adult with non-EU citizenship. It is irrelevant if your mother is EU citizen or not, you will need visa to enter EU, and you will need certain permissions (differs in each EU country) to stay in EU. If your mother gets EU citizenship, it grants some rights to her, but not directly to you, because you are different person, you are not your mother. ...



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