Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

This page has more details on your situation as a non-EU family member of an EU national: http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=463&langId=en Most importantly it clarifies that you'll have the right to live, work and get educated in the country your mother lives and works in, not the entire EU. And it will probably require copious amounts of ...


10

It depends on which country you think most of the participants will come from. If it's an international conference, bear in mind that US / Canadian visas - even for short visits - are NOT easy to get for people from many countries. Even if it's for the purpose of a conference, I have heard many anecdotal stories from friends and colleagues who require a ...


10

The first country that comes to mind is the Republic of the Maldives. Indeed according to this link no visa is required. I expect this to be the case for most "paradise-like" destinations. If a visa is needed, the best chance to enter visa-free is if you are a Scandinavian, since most countries allow Finns, Swedes and Danes to enter without a visa (source: ...


8

European countries tend to be the easiest for most nations to get to, when you consider transport costs and visas, as short term EU visas are relatively simple. We don't have the restrictive policies the US have, for example. London prides itself on being an ideal location for conferences, as Heathrow Airport has connections to everywhere but the ...


7

Yes, foreigners are required to register with the police, unless it is done by the accommodation you are staying in. This is regulated in the Croatian Aliens Act, sections 147(1) and 147(5): Članak 147. (1) Stranac na kratkotrajnom boravku dužan je sam prijaviti svoj smještaj u roku od 2 dana od ulaska u Republiku Hrvatsku, odnosno od promjene smještaja. ...


6

It turns out the information is indeed on the Azerbaijan Ministry of Foreign Affairs website, just the link does not stand out well and the page contains at least one other broken link. The countries applying the visa-free regime page has a section II group. For the holders of any kind of passports (Diplomatic, service, (official/special) and ...


5

As it already has been stated weather your husband is an EU citizen is irrelevant. What counts is your nationality and personal information. Whether you need a visa primarily depends on your nationality. Facts like remaining validity of your passport, your country of residence, might have an effect as well. The IATA has a handy webservice where your can ...


5

If you are under 21 or have a proof that your are dependent on your mother, you can work or live in an EU country where your mother lives. But if you keep living in a non-EU country, you will still need a visa to travel to an EU country, since you are Turkish citizen.


5

Wikipedia's list of Visa requirements for X citizens articles is surprisingly comprehensive and up to date. It's not perfect or complete, and it's definitely better for nationalities that are heavily represented among the editorship, but if you happen to come from any large-ish English-speaking country you're gold. Obviously you'll want to double-check any ...


4

Timatic is generally considered the definitive reference for Visas. It's what most travel agents use when booking tickets, and what most airlines use when verifying you have the correct visa before boarding. In general Timatic isn't free, however a number of websites do allow free access to it, such as Star Alliance and Gulf Air. You can use either of these ...


4

I've always found http://www.projectvisa.com/ to be a very helpful resource as it gives you a really quick way to check visa requirements and then you can verify it against one of the links (typically to the countries Foreign Affairs website). While travelling I've noticed that few people seem to know about this site because it pretty much never shows up on ...


3

Details are complex and partly off-topic for this site but understanding the logic behind EU law might help. Basically, you don't have any direct rights, only your mother does. That said, a person's right of free movement in the EU also entails e.g. traveling or moving to another EU country with their non-EU spouse or dependents. But the idea is that ...


3

Quoting the Bureau of Immigration, Philippines about the procedure for extension of VISA. Please note that this information is valid for extension of all kind of Visa, and not specific to a certain category. How would I extend my visa? You may get an application form from the Visa Extension Section located at the ground floor Annex building, ...


3

The best lists I know of are on Wikipedia, they cover more subtleties than just "visa-free" but they are unfortunately not 100% complete probably because 300 some citizenships multiples by 300 some countries to visit would result in 90,000 entries to get right and maintain. Sometimes you don't need a visa at all, sometimes you don't need a visa but you need ...


2

Since you are (apparently) not married, I'm afraid that he is in the same situation as if he was a random Ecuadorian national with his residence in Spain, which means he will need a visa (per the UK Border Agency's website). As far as the law is concerned, neither you nor your relatives are his “family” so it really doesn't matter that you are traveling ...


2

The legal answer, as you've already found out, is "no": 4、Are the foreign visitors who completed 72-hour visa-free transit procedures and entered into China permitted to leave Beijing to other Chinese cities? 72-hour visa-free transit foreign visitors are not permitted to leave Beijing to other Chinese cities during their 72-hour visa-free ...


2

You cannot rely on your visa when traveling with someone else. Every person needs their own visa to justify their own permit to enter the country. Since Turkey is not a part of the EU, you will have to find out by each of your nationality if you are able to enter Turkey without a visa.


2

Like my answer on a related question, the Maldives would be a good candidate. Its international airport seems to be well connected. Personally I don't think the visa fees will be a deal breaker. I know from experience that getting visa for the Netherlands for conference attendance will be easy. Consulates do check visa applications for conference and if ...


1

If you need a visa when flying, you will also need a visa when arriving on a boat. In most cases, it does not matter at all how you enter the country. While there are exceptions, as the comments suggest, these are usually only to make things easier or harder for common cases. Minor Iraqis travelling from UAE to Ireland on a boat are surely not that common, ...


1

You are an adult with non-EU citizenship. It is irrelevant if your mother is EU citizen or not, you will need visa to enter EU, and you will need certain permissions (differs in each EU country) to stay in EU. If your mother gets EU citizenship, it grants some rights to her, but not directly to you, because you are different person, you are not your mother. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible