Hot answers tagged

15

It depends on which country you think most of the participants will come from. If it's an international conference, bear in mind that US / Canadian visas - even for short visits - are NOT easy to get for people from many countries. Even if it's for the purpose of a conference, I have heard many anecdotal stories from friends and colleagues who require a ...


14

This is a literal, rather than idiomatic, translation. In Russian the text is "белым списком шенгена" which is probably better translated as "Schengen whitelist". This seems to be referring to countries whose nationals do not require a visa to travel to countries in the Schengen area, as this is what is happening for Ukraine, but neither this term or the ...


14

There's several approaches you can take. They all involve some planning, and there are some extra marks of caution. Mix Schengen and non-schengen stays. The actual Schengen rules say for any given day in the Schengen area, you must have spent less than 90 out of the 180 preceeding days in the Schengen area. The EU even provides a calculator to help with ...


12

This page has more details on your situation as a non-EU family member of an EU national: http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=463&langId=en Most importantly it clarifies that you'll have the right to live, work and get educated in the country your mother lives and works in, not the entire EU. And it will probably require copious amounts of ...


10

The Canadian Government provides a questionnaire to determine which possibilities you have to visit Canada and if a visa is required. In addition to your citizenship, there are a few other issues which may be relevant to determine the requirements, e.g. country of residence, any relationship with Canadian citizens, age or any previous permanent residence in ...


9

European countries tend to be the easiest for most nations to get to, when you consider transport costs and visas, as short term EU visas are relatively simple. We don't have the restrictive policies the US have, for example. London prides itself on being an ideal location for conferences, as Heathrow Airport has connections to everywhere but the ...


9

Yes, foreigners are required to register with the police, unless it is done by the accommodation you are staying in. This is regulated in the Croatian Aliens Act, sections 147(1) and 147(5): Članak 147. (1) Stranac na kratkotrajnom boravku dužan je sam prijaviti svoj smještaj u roku od 2 dana od ulaska u Republiku Hrvatsku, odnosno od promjene smještaja. ...


9

The short answer is no, you cannot stay for 100 days using the ESTA and the Visa Waiver Program. You will have to apply for a visa or change your travel plans. The longer answer involves clearing up a lot of misunderstandings - primarily about what an ESTA (and the related VWP) is. See this question for a full description. The ESTA does not allow you to ...


9

If you plan to "operate" your business over the phone, you might actually be working in Europe. That's not what a tourist does. There could be tax consequences, both home and abroad. If you can refrain from working on your business on your holiday, options might be: Apply for D visa for France or Italy, then only time in other countries counts against the ...


8

You don't need a visa if you stay up to 30 days in Mongolia. From Mongolian Ministry of foreign affairs: Within the framework of the 100 days of the intensification of economy the Government of Mongolia approved a list of 42 countries with a visa free access to Mongolia. According to this decision nationals of these countries are entitled with the ...


8

If you ignore the semantics of "Visa" v's "pre-approved Visa-like thing", then Australia is generally no different (or frequently better) than many other major countries. For example, comparing Australia, the US, and Canada (based on their new regulations starting March 15, 2016). Citizens allowed without any form of pre-approval : Australia - 1 ...


7

Vatican city doesn't require a visa to visit its public area, mainly piazza and basilica di San Pietro, and cappella sistina. Entering its private areas is another story though. Like for Andorra, you still need a Schengen visa to get to Rome.


7

It turns out the information is indeed on the Azerbaijan Ministry of Foreign Affairs website, just the link does not stand out well and the page contains at least one other broken link. The countries applying the visa-free regime page has a section II group. For the holders of any kind of passports (Diplomatic, service, (official/special) and ...


7

To be somewhat of a nitpick, there are two types of bounces. The more common type is when a visitor arrives who does not need a visa (e.g., Canadian, American) or already holds a visa. I wrote a very detailed description of this in an article which starts with... Sometimes people arrive in the UK and do not perform well in their landing interview; ...


6

Wikipedia's list of Visa requirements for X citizens articles is surprisingly comprehensive and up to date. It's not perfect or complete, and it's definitely better for nationalities that are heavily represented among the editorship, but if you happen to come from any large-ish English-speaking country you're gold. Obviously you'll want to double-check any ...


6

Reading the letter of the law in that article, you should be fine, because entry and entry clearance are not the same thing. However, in practical terms this piece of hair-splitting may not help you much, as when you go to clear immigration they will pull your record and see that you've been denied a visa in the past, and assess your case for entry ...


6

My understanding is that St. Peter is the only currently operating scheduled operator, although there are irregular visits by the usual suspects (P&O, Princess etc). Russian immigration rules are notoriously opaque, but my understanding is as follows: The 72-hour visa-free entry is only available if booked as part of a package, stays over 24 hours ...


6

I am not too sure about the “despite colonization” bit. I can't really see a pattern, one way or the other. Some ex-British colonies offer visas on arrival for British citizens (e.g. Kenya), some don't (e.g. India) and most treat German or French citizens in exactly the same way. And then for some reason, Luxembourgish and Finnish citizenships – but not ...


6

To answer my own question: when I was crossing the border from Slovenia to Croatia, the border officer asked me about the lack of an entry stamp into the EU. I showed him my chewed-up IDBUS ticket and explained that, apparently, the French border control sometimes didn't stamp passports coming from the UK. He asked me why; I said that I didn't know, and that ...


6

There is no EU legislation that addresses the bilateral agreements involving member states that were in force prior to the Schengen Agreement. During the debate, questions from EU Parliamentarians were put to the EU Parliament with the outcome that it would be down to the individual states to honour their prior bilateral agreements. You can enjoy extra ...


6

Same rules apply for Americans or other nationals who do not require a visa. Once you enter any Schengen member state, the counter will start counting the 90 out 180 days. From The European Commission official website As from 18 October 2013 for the vast majority of the third-country nationals – irrespective of being visa required or exempt – who ...


6

Here's the actual legal basis for visa-free travel: http://base.garant.ru/195505 . It says you can stay for 72 hours, have to leave by the same port where you entered, and most importantly (point #6) it says you may only be located on the territory declared in the "official tourist program" filed by your cruise line with the Russian government. There may be ...


6

I'll give you some of my personal experience as a white American citizen living in France on a long-stay working Visa. Standard disclaimers apply, and this isn't legal advice. Firstly, I wouldn't worry too much about border checks coming into France, and not at all while traveling in the Schengen area after you have already entered the country. Border ...


5

If you are under 21 or have a proof that your are dependent on your mother, you can work or live in an EU country where your mother lives. But if you keep living in a non-EU country, you will still need a visa to travel to an EU country, since you are Turkish citizen.


5

EU-Bürger müssen sich bei einem Aufenthalt von bis zu 90 Tagen nicht mehr bei den örtlichen Behörden registrieren lassen. source: http://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/DE/Laenderinformationen/00-SiHi/Nodes/KroatienSicherheit_node.html#doc358506bodyText4 translation: EU citizens no longer have to register locally during a stay (in Croatia) of up to 90 ...


5

Yes, in principle you should have gotten an entry stamp for the Schengen area. It seems the French border guard did not follow the rules. I don't think UK border guards generally put exit stamps in passports, I believe the UK authorities should have gotten a passenger list from IDBUS so you should be fine as far as the UK is concerned. As far as Schengen ...


5

It seems best to go to the official Australia Department of Immigration and Border Protection Electronic Travel Authority web site to check your ETA. It appears to be legitimate for third party web sites to accept applications for an ETA. It is noted by an official web site that: "Your travel agent or airline can also book your ETA."



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