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27

Vatican City is recognized as a country. For example the CIA's World Factbook and UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office both refer to it as a country. What I suggest: count it as a country, but raise your target to 51. Win-win. :-)


20

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


17

Vatican City is certainly open to visit for tourists at large; as you perhaps know, there is no actual boundary between Rome and Vatican City, meaning that nobody checks the papers of those who move from one to the other. However, when I first read your question, I thought that you meant St. Peter's Cathedral, which takes up so much of Vatican City and ...


13

Vatican City is generally recognized as a country by most authorities, and has international recognition as such. It may not be a very big country (indeed, it is smaller than the US Pentagon), but it is a country nonetheless. If your goal is purely on the number of countries reached, then you should definitely count it as one (and you should also visit San ...


10

Notice: The Sistine Chapel reopens As the Conclave has now come to an end with the election of Pope Francis, the Sistine Chapel will reopen for visits by the public on Monday 18 March at 9am. It will also again be possible to visit the Borgia Apartment and the Collection of Modern Religious Art.


10

With 109 acres (44 hectares) within its walls, the Vatican is easily traveled by foot; however, most of this area is inaccessible to tourists. No reference about Anglicans, Muslims or any other - just tourists. Any where that a Catholic can get in, you can too, regardless of your background. And also importantly, regardless of your gender - a recent ...


9

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific ...


9

Vatican City is definitely a country. It is recognized as such in 1929 by a treaty with Italy. It is not a revival of the Papal States. Size doesn't matter for being a country (there is another small country in Italy: San Marino). When you have visited Vatican City, you can say that you have been in the smallest country in the world. It might be the most ...


6

The various news articles I read about this (eg Reuters and Catholic.org) said that they installed a false floor and the stoves. They needed about a week to do that plus sweep for bugs, and that work will need to be undone once the conclave is finished. They will be voting for an unknown amount of time (Huffington Post) : a week is a good guess I suppose. If ...


6

In addition to being listed separately in publications like the CIA World Factbook, Vatican City also has its own ISO-3166 domain: .va. The title for 3166 is "Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions", which could imply a subdivision of Italy, except... The United Nations was a party to Vatican City receiving its own ...


5

Imagine you've reached 50 countries, including Vatican City. Would you feel you've achieved your goal? There's the answer to your question. Your opinion is the only thing that matters here. Personally, I feel England, Scotland and Wales are separate countries, but that Vatican City is just part of Italy. Fortunately, I'm not a diplomat.


4

One regularly used definition of a country is whether it's a member of the United Nations. The Vatican is not, it has observer status. However, it most certainly is an independent territory, which probably is a better definition in this context as compared to 'country', anyway. Or, perhaps you should make your objective to visit 50 countries and independent ...


4

There's an article on the Daily Mail that covered (heh) when this was released. From the article: 'Inappropriately dressed' visitors to the Holy City have been told to cover up by Swiss Guards or face a ban. From this point, shorts skirts and bare shoulders are not allowed. The guards drew aside men in shorts and women with uncovered ...


2

No, there are tours for everyone. Unless a cardinal or a church employee, I can't see how one being a catholic provides any benefits there.


1

yes, why? Has space or territory that has internationally recognized boundaries. Has people who live there on an ongoing basis. Has economic activity and an organized economy. A country regulates foreign and domestic trade and issues money. Has the power of social engineering, such as education. Has a transportation system for moving goods and people. Has ...


1

Short answer: The Vatican is a country. Long answer requires understanding that there is a difference between "State" and "Country", but The Vatican qualifies as both anyway. The Vatican City is a State (the legalistic definition of an independent country), meaning it has full national sovereignty. It makes its own laws, has citizens, some of whom live ...



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