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2

As a native New Yorker, I've done this trip very many times via both car and plane. And I would only consider flying. It will be cheaper, faster, and much more pleasant for all. JetBlue is the best option in terms of comfort, though not the cheapest (if that's your main concern.) Countless other carriers do that route as well. The only exception in my ...


2

Seems that both meetings and training are allowed under scope of B1/B2. Relevant purposes of travel allowed on B1 visa: Conference, meeting, trade show, or business event attendee — Will receive no salary or income from a U.S based company/entity. For scientific, educational, professional or business purposes. Training — ...


-2

In theory it is possible! I spent exactly 90 days in the US with a ESTA visa waver (also coming from South America), then I traveled for about 3 weeks in Canada and entered the US with a flight ticket that left 2 weeks later from NYC - there was no problem at all coming back into the country, just make sure you have your tickets ready to show at the border ...


6

If you really would rather be safe than sorry, you should follow the advice on the page you linked to, as it is advice I've followed in the past: A valid prescription or doctors note is required on all medication entering the U.S. Now practically we all know that's not really the case. Bringing in paracetamol/tylenol, or Imodium, or asthma medicines, etc, ...


10

It's called interview, as in asking questions rather than a meeting. Of course it might vary by the consulate where you're applying. In my experience: you're just attended by the clerk at one of the counters, so it's not really much of a meeting you get your fingerprints scanned you're asked standard questions about the purpose of your visit you're asked ...


1

Last September I flew into Paris with a one-way ticket, and nobody said a thing. Later I re-entered France by bus from the UK, and wasn't asked anything, either. Spain and France are both part of the Schengen Area, and as such ought to have the same rules, so you shouldn't have any problem. But it's still possible you might be asked about your travel ...


3

You have to shop around. Royal Bank had the best rate last time I had to change a relatively large amount and wire transfer it, most of the other banks were clustered together, and significantly worse. The actual amount charged on top of the interbank rate should be around 2-3%, not 5.5%. The spread (buy-sell) might be 5.5, because you're looking at two ...


3

With regards to Canada, you are fine. Italians do not need a visa and your passport is fine. For the layover in New York you will need an ESTA from the Americans. You will also need an "e-Passport" if yours was issued after 10/25/06. See further here: http://travel.state.gov/content/visas/english/visit/visa-waiver-program.html


10

What you are talking about is this 100/50 USD bill: I have had this problem many times. If you end up with old USD bills older that series 2003-6 then it won't be accepted by most countries and money changers outside the United States. More frequently the problem I have noticed is with the bills with the front face photo to be smaller than the current ...


1

I didn't know these fraud protection measures existed within the US, but they are not uncommon in Europe. They even became more strict recently. In general I am quite happy with this protection. Only three years ago, my bank called me if it is possible that I withdrew money from Brussels and Chicago on the same day. I guess this happened on a regular base ...


5

I live between Japan and the US, and travel regularly in Europe and SE Asia. My American bank issued credit cards regularly get blocked for suspected fraud (I should not that two cards have actually been defrauded before). My solution is to have three credit cards and two debit/check cards spread across two banks so that I always have a backup, and also its ...


5

When it comes down to it, it's often a people problem rather than a system problem. Someone could accidentally write down the note and forget to press the button, or mis-read a flag on your account. With HSBC in the UK, I travelled to all sorts of countries without notifying them, and despite their 'security', never got flagged or blocked. South Africa, ...


3

Try calling them when you're at the ATM.. they have some very tetchy fraud protection algorithms these days.. We found my traveling companion's card rejected due to some weird issue but they were able reset the flag on her account with a fairly brief phone call. Based on your experience though, a backup method of getting cash would seem to be in order.


8

Yes and No. There are a few different ways to get TSA Pre - each with it's own restrictions. You can get access via your airline, particularly if you're a frequent flyer. Historically you had to specifically request to gain access via this means, however many airline now will automatically submit you for access. Check with your airline to see if there's a ...


2

Short answer: Yes, if you're a US permanent resident or a citizen of the Canada, Netherlands, South Korea or Mexico, and apparently it's valid for five years. TSA: Who is eligible for TSA Pre✓™? Canadian citizens who are members of NEXUS. Foreign citizens who are members of Global Entry (see Global Entry eligibility) and not registered as a ...


1

According to Visa Waiver Program Wikipedia page (I assume you can join the Visa Waiver Program) Passport validity The standard requirement for passport validity is 6 months beyond the expected date of departure from the United States. However, the US has signed agreements with a number of countries to waive this requirement. [107]


3

It is possible to do a visa entry without flying (to Canada). For example, wherever there is a bridge to Canada (Detroit, Buffalo, etc) you can go partway across the bridge, turn around, and come back through US immigration. The trouble you will have with a flight to Canada is the airline will want to be sure you have the right to enter Canada first ...


2

Yes, no problem. You can exit and re-enter during the 90 day limit, and in fact if you leave North America (USA, Canada, Mexico) the 90 day period resets. You just need to make sure your ESTA is valid for the entire period as well (they're usually valid for 2 years) and you have evidence of your travel plans and finances are in order.


1

In my experience there are two situations where people tend to get on the wrong side of the road: After stopping for whatever reason. If you're thinking about something else when you get back in your car and start driving, you can very easily do the wrong thing based on your usual driving side. Visualise how you're going to start out (enter the street) ...


4

The Japanese Embassy is correct. Per the Consulate-General of Japan in Vancouver: Q: I was born in Canada and have dual citizenship, Canadian and Japanese. When I go to Japan, which passport should I use? A: According to the Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Act, Japanese citizens are required to use their Japanese passport to enter ...


4

To answer the original question, you would be working illegally. Period. Full stop. Do not pass "Go" and do not return to the USA for 5 years. Go to Detroit from Windsor ( walking distance ) play in a club, get your hotel room and bar bill covered -> also working illegally. Your employer will also come to the attention of INS (and possibly homeland ...


17

Your employer is full of it and sounds dodgy as hell. Canadians do not need a US visa to visit or study in the US, but they most certainly need one for any sort of work, including unpaid internships. Now of course you could lie and say you're visiting the US for some other reason, but like the embassy link above says: All Canadians are reminded that ...


2

Boston Logan is one of the most efficient airports I have flown in and out of. It is also a huge airport. From my experience, if you don't require assistance, I reckon you be at the airport at least an hour before your flight departs.


1

I'll answer for the Québec part of it since I'm a local: The 15 will be much quicker but route 133 which we call Route des Patriotes here is very nice and you could take it up to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu if coming from Vermont. And try not to get to Montreal at traffic hour, it can take quite a while to get on the island.


5

It is legal to look for work whilst in the US under the Visa Waiver Program, however it is NOT legal to actually work whilst on the WVP. If he is offered any form of employment within the US he will need to return to his home country and apply for a work visa for the US. Depending on the specific situation, obtaining such a visa will be somewhere between ...


2

Get a Hand Bidet Sprayer @ www.bathroomsprayers.com and then you can clean with water conveniently. Nothing you can do about a public toilet but as soon as you get home you'll be all set and your visiting guests will be much happier also!


2

It's a matter of preference, the Vermont route is a little bit faster, though a little plain in my opinion. I prefer the NY route because the scenery varies, you get to see mountains (Adirondacks) and lakes, the road isn't just a straight stretch and there are plenty of rest areas and service stops. The 87 becomes the 15 in Quebec which is a highway. Those ...


3

This may not be exactly what you are looking for, but it will be better than just dry toilet paper. Wet wipes are sold in most grocery/sundries stores in the baby section. They can even be purchased in small packages which are made to fit in a purse and some of them are specifically sold as being flushable (i.e. it's ok to just throw them in the toilet ...


0

This may help you. copied from here: http://funnychutkule.com/3446/british-vs-american-english-words-differences/


5

Many of my Japanese colleagues (as well as Indian colleagues) usually prefer to stay in hotels that provide bidet toilet pots. If that is not available then most will keep an empty bottle in their bathrooms. I can say this for sure about my buddies from the Middle East, India and Asia in general. It is fairly common to instruct house keeping not to dispose ...


1

"Restroom" may be understood, but "bathroom" means exactly what it says (you know, shower & bath) and "prop room" is unknown. What you mean is either "public conveniences" if you are extremely polite, but "toilet" and "loo" are the well known terms you search.


0

No. You cannot apply for a U.S. visa inside the U.S. A U.S. visa is only for entering the U.S., and can only be applied for while outside the U.S. Even if you had a visa, it does not mean "for sure that you will be able to come back". A visa just permits you to apply for admission. It is always possible to be denied entry on a nonimmigrant visa. If you ...


3

No. This will be considered willful violation of your visa terms and is illegal to do. As the name suggests, your intent of entering the US is as a tourist not as a worker. By law, you cannot be compensated for any 'work' that you perform while you have entered as a tourist. You can surely rent a house to stay though.


3

When talking to a customs or immigration officer, the most important thing to do is tell the truth. This includes "I don't know" if that is the answer you have. The second most important thing to do is to show that you have planned and prepared, so that you trot out "I don't know" as little as possible. The questions start like this: who are you? what is ...


4

I've crossed the border hundreds of times (if not thousands), so they can basically ask you anything. There's no reason to be nervous about the questions, unless you have something to hide. If that's the case, then do not attempt to enter the US lying otherwise you will be in a world of trouble. I'm a US Citizen (naturalized) so my English is a bit ...


3

You don't need a guide. But if you camp out within the National Park then you need a backcountry permit. (See the national park page on backcountry permits) Also be aware of the warnings about hiking in the Grand Canyon -- people do get (literally) lost and the conditions can be harsh.


1

Most F1 visas for the US last for 1 year more than the average degree duration. In my case, the visa was stamped for 5 years for a 4 year bachelor's degree. If your visa has not expired then you need to make sure to get a travel signature on your I-20 from your school's Department of International Education which is valid for one year and allows multiple ...


9

Regarding ID: they do not need id. Source: TSA Blog Regarding written consent: It is definitely a good idea but is not a strict requirement any more than if you were driving. Nobody would ask unless one of the kids tries to make a huge scene, yelling "you're not my parent", etc. International travel would be a different matter.


5

If you know where you're going and you don't want a guide you're unde no obligation to take one. You can look at Tripadvisor thread regarding the same topic and also on the National Park Service Site for maps and other information regarding the Grand Canyon National Park.


2

The validity of the license from a foreign country would be determined by that country. So if that country's license becomes invalid when you leave the country or your residence permit expires you have no license to drive with in California. The International Driving Permit is usually a translation of your actual driver's license into many languages ...


4

The Wikipedia entry tells us that is a 90 mile long valley in Northern California, the city of Salinas is at the northwestern end of the valley, the Salinas rivers flows all along the valley. Steinbeck's novels where all over the valley, I don't know about any specific location worth checking out.



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