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0

Yes, at least in New York City. Note the sign in this image that directs walkers and runners to the walkway, and skaters and cyclists to the bikeway:


2

Here's some general advice: Your inclination to disclose your earlier rejection is correct. It's never a good idea to conceal anything; the cost of getting found out is likely to be very high. The 214(b) rejection seems to indicate that the evaluating officer was unconvinced that you were planning to leave the country. The UK also issues visa rejections ...


14

If you are flying from the US to Spain via Düsseldorf, you will clear immigration for the Schengen area on arrival in Düsseldorf. After that nobody is going to stop you from going wherever you like. For instance, you can take the SkyTrain directly from your arrival terminal to Bahnhof Düsseldorf Flughafen (Düsseldorf Airport train station; €2.60) and then ...


1

As long as your visa is valid on the day you go, you can (try to) enter the U.S. There is never a guarantee any time a foreigner goes to the U.S. that they will be allowed entry or how long a duration of stay they will be given. An immigration officer could always, if he feels like, decide to deny entry or give a shorter duration of stay if he feels like ...


7

As with most things about travel in the U.S., the answer varies from state to state and from city to city. Yes, broadly speaking, it's possible to travel in the United States without paying for lodging, but I would not say it is especially easy or comfortable. There are many campsites where the fee is quite nominal (under $20), budget motels in rural areas, ...


5

It depends on the country of your passport. In general your passport has to be valid six months past your departure from the US. However, there is a lengthy list of countries which are exempt from this requirement; for these countries the passport must be valid up to the date of departure. The exempt list is 126 countries, covering most of the world, so ...


1

No, the passport and Advance Passenger Information merely need to be correct at the time you check in. You can update the information at check in, either online or at the desk. Remember that, if you are a visa waiver national travelling under an ESTA, you will need a fresh ESTA with each new passport you use to enter the United States. If you have been ...


3

It is issued by DHS nowadays. The forms you're seeing haven't been updated since DHS was created; these matters used to be handled by the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the Justice Department (where most federal law enforcement was located), but in 2003 INS was split into various pieces and all were transferred to DHS (which was created that same ...


3

While you have ample time between landing at O'Hare Airport in the morning to get to Milwaukee Intermodal Station for the evening Indian Trails departure, you might want to save yourself traveling the wrong direction into downtown Chicago to the main Greyhound station or train station. Coach USA buses go directly from O'Hare Airport to Milwaukee Intermodal ...


3

CBP is concerned that visitors to the United States do not intend to live in the US and are not likely to become dependent on public funds. Thus, when you enter, you should be able to show that you are departing the US (for Canada!) and that you have sufficient funds for your road trip. Be sure to tell the CBP officer that you are driving to Canada. You ...


4

Upon revisiting this question some hours later, I think the real problem is that you are selecting the "wrong" Houghton. Greyhound's search engine recognizes three possible Indian Trails stops: Houghton, MI, Houghton City Center, MI, and Houghton Little Caesars, MI. I didn't look at the trip details closely enough in my initial search, either. If you do ...


3

I would opt for the flight that arrives the previous day. Then I would look for the cheapest hotel around the airport - make sure to look just outside the airport, and it'll be a lot cheaper than one right in the airport. Hotels usually offer free shuttle to/from the terminal. Once you get to Chicago, call the hotel and confirm the pickup time/location - ...


2

I'm currently on a J-1 visitor visa in the US, and we have similar rules. When I travelled from Canada, we were told to make sure that we got in on the J-1 and that the border agent didn't admit us on a tourist visa. With regards, to entering early or if you got admitted on the wrong visa, we were told that we would normally have to exit the country and ...


2

As a citizen you can't be denied entry once you arrive on US soil. You will still have to prove you're a citizen, but the expired US passport will go a long way to do that. It is, however, still "unlawful" for a US citizen to enter the US without holding a valid US passport, no matter whether you have a different valid passport -- see 8 U.S.C. 1185(b) -- ...


-3

Hopefully they don't care, unless you're a "person of interest" to someone. That may unfortunately be way too often the case now with all of the overblown NSA tracking of everyone etc. And the NSA did absorb the US Customs service, so unfortunately they might. But for normal purposes, they only really care when someone enters, or when someone gets involved ...


2

There is a concise guide for a short layover in Chicago, published in Forbes http://www.forbes.com/sites/andrewbender/2014/01/21/layover-guide-chicago-ohare/ The guide recommends to buy a $10 day pass on a stored-value Ventra Card. A one-way ticket is $5 from O’Hare (vending machines in the station below the airport) Great pointers can also be found here: ...


8

New York City subway service has only been interrupted once for snow in 110 years, and the decision to do so was criticized when the snowstorm actually dropped far less snow than expected. It was also interrupted for Hurricane Sandy, back in 2012, but that was actually a well-advised closure. You're extremely unlikely to see a system-wide service ...


1

There doesn't seem to be an issue with you taking a car from Vancouver and returning it in the US. Just did a search on Kayak picking up in Vancouver Airport and dropping off in SeaTac airport and the major rental companies are happy to oblige even though it's getting a bit pricey.


3

Legally speaking, yes, you would need a valid exit visa. Official source: В соответствии с законодательством граждане Республики Узбекистан, выехавшие на временное жительство (в служебную командировку, на учебу, работу по контракту и т. д.), в страны, для въезда в которые не требуется оформление въездных виз, в случаях необходимости выезда в третью ...


0

When you arrive at the US border no-one really cares whether or not you had permission to leave your country of origin or country of residence. So the permission to leave the country of Uzbekistan is only applicable to Uzbekistan unless a treaty exists between the countries to check for such visas which I wasn't able to find between Uzbekistan and US. ...


4

From http://japan.usembassy.gov/e/visa/tvisa-nivgeneralfaq.html May I apply for a US visa when I’m just visiting Japan? Applicants for visas to the United States should generally apply at the American Embassy or Consulate with jurisdiction over their place of permanent residence. Non-immigrant visa applicants who are resident in Japan must ...


40

Yes, they almost certainly do know you've left. The US processes passport details for all air passengers through a system called APIS, and ties that to the electronic I-94 (arrival and departure record). You can check your US arrival and departure history online. This allows you to verify their record of your departure.


1

As a Canadian travelling to the US, I am always taken aback when I need to sign slips of paper when making purchases. The joke is that instead of having my card signed, I have written "ASK FOR ID" in the signature field. Since I've never been asked for ID, it's clear that no one is checking the signatures! This is somehow supposed to be more secure? All ...


2

Generally speaking laws are based on jurisdictions, not the person. Just because something is legal/illegal in your country, doesn't make it illegal/legal in a country you're visiting. Cops enforce their laws not yours. Plus, it would be a nightmare for bouncers to evaluate legality of the person based on their home country (this person is from Ontario, so ...


1

Can a visitor who is “of age” In the United States you are "of age" at 18, you just cant drink/buy until you are 21. Sadly there is no way around it, I am from mexico and in mexico drinking age is 18, once you cross the border you will get fined if you drink alcohol and are younger than 21. It also works both ways, people in the United States can ...


20

As far as the law goes, you can be denied a visa for (almost) any or (almost) no reason, including if the consular officer doesn't like the color of your tie. Whether you will be denied a visa for having unpaid credit card debt is therefore not an objective science, but probably not. The consular officer's task is to reject people who would attempt to ...


2

Disclaimer: IANAL, consult your immigration lawyer. Generally no, especially if you're asking about academic studies: Is it permissible to enroll in school while in B-1/B-2 status? No, it is not. The regulations, at 8 CFR 214.2(b)(7), specifically prohibit study in the United States while in B-1 or B-2 status. Before enrolling in classes, ...


5

Tim Urban's wonderfully thorough piece Everything You Don't Know About Tipping explains what tipping in the US is about. Unless a server was actively hostile, rude and offensive to you, it's not right to deprive them of their income. That's just how it works in the US. Furthermore, as is mentioned, if they get good tips, servers see it as a reflection of ...


1

It would be illegal to buy alcoholic beverages, and depending on where you are, it might be illegal to consume them, but for the most part, if you drink in a private setting, you are safe. Parents frequently allow their underage children to drink at home, and are only arrested for doing so if they also allow other people's children to drink as well. Don't ...


0

Most recent time I did this I got a 1-month prepaid SIM card from T-Mobile. I think was something like $70 with tax and a SIM card to fit my phone. There was a couple G of LTE data and some phone time. Pretty painless- maybe 5 minutes in the shop. Here are their current rates. It worked out okay, but coverage was a bit spotty outside major cities. The data ...


4

In general in the US, the 15% guideline only applies if you're getting some service associated with your food/beverage - service in a sit-down restaurant, food delivered, etc. If I'm getting coffee to go and paying cash, I'll usually throw some of the coins I get in change into the tip jar, but that's as much because I don't like carrying coins as anything ...


1

Typically you are always subject to the laws of the jurisdiction you are in unless you have diplomatic immunity. So if you are in the US, the US drinking laws apply to you. If you are in Germany, the German drinking laws apply to you. Your nationality doesn't matter - the laws of the place you are in matter.


1

Just for additional information and warning: A lot of restaurants in New England and along the Canadian border will add an automatic 18% gratuity to your bill. This means they've decided how much you're going to tip and put it on your bill. They will always tell you that they're adding it, or forewarn you that it will be added... but only ever in small ...


1

No, you will not be able to drink legally within the United States. Purchasing alcoholic beverages as a minor, or knowingly purchasing alcohol for a minor, are both criminal offenses in all 50 states. Conversely, if someone underage were to travel to Australia and drink with you, then as long as they're old enough under Australian law, they are allowed ...


7

The short answer to the question is no: local laws apply everywhere you go, and the standard minimum drinking age in the United States is 21. The long answer is that yes, it is absolutely legal for someone under the age of 21 to purchase and consume alcohol in the United States— in certain areas, under the right circumstances. But those circumstances will ...


9

Simply put, no. As an UK immigrant myself, first arriving at age 19 (and effectively drinking in the UK since age 16) I certainly experienced this first hand. You have to be 21. Significantly, age is nearly always determined by requesting and reviewing a drivers license which has a picture of the person plus the date of birth. This is unlike my ...


-5

Drinking laws apply to the area you are in, Not the area you came from. In the United States the legal drinking limit is 21. HOWEVER I have been drinking since the age 18(now 29) :). If you know people, you will have fun.


18

Age limits and such like are always those of the place you are in. While you are in another country you have to obey the local laws on drink, and other stuff, whatever your laws are back home. The good news is that you can do things that are legal in the place you are, even if they are illegal back home (with some exceptions), which is great news if you are ...


17

In general it is allowed to volunteer in the US when you are there on a B1 or B2 visa, or on visa waiver program, and for most other visas that do not permit paid employment. However there are some significant restrictions, and it is best to check them out. The most significant restriction is that you can only volunteer to do things that are normally done ...


6

The answer in the broad sense is maybe. Due to State vs. Federal application of laws there are circumstances in which people under the age of 21 are allowed to drink within the state. But you will not be allowed to do this at a bar!! And you will not be allowed to purchase at the store! Some states may allow it in a presence of a parent. So if you are ...


50

The federal standards (that states lose highway funds for not following) are that you cannot purchase or publicly possess alcoholic beverages under the age of 21. Technically this is implemented as state laws, but it applies in all 50 states and DC. That means neither of you can buy alcohol legally. In addition, the general rule is that you can't ask someone ...


4

The quality of the food is irrelevant to the tip. The cook gets payed a full wage and does not receive any of the tip. Therefore your only concern when deciding how much to tip should be on the service provided by the waiter or waitress. DO NOT reward the service staff for the work of the kitchen. Personally, if I get bad service then I tip about half of ...


2

Your plans will be fine. As long as there are less than 90 days between your first arrival in the US, and last departure from the US, then there will be no problem. The VWP 90-day clock keeps ticking for the days you are in Canada, but that's not an issue for you.


3

While in the US, you should definitely tip. This should only be based on the service; you're tipping your waiter/waitress, NOT the cook. I generally use 20% as my starting point, if I don't feel that they did a good job I'll drop down to 15% (or further if need be). Likewise, I'll go up to 30% if I feel like the server really earned it. In almost all cases, ...


1

There's no (public) complete list of Greyhound's partner bus lines, as far as I know. But PRC appears to be Vermont Transit (aka Premier Coach). The one daily schedule you mentioned leaves Hanover, NH at 2:50 pm, arriving in White River Junction at 3:05 pm. This corresponds exactly to Vermont Transit's schedule. Concord Coach Lines and Vermont Transit ...


4

If the tip is not included in the bill, I will do what you indicated... make a rough guess add the rough guess to the bill top up the new total to the next highest integer put that figure in the total and sign the receipt (or credit card) This same technique works for me in the USA, the UK, France, Italy, Germany... basically all of the EEA, and Russia, ...


0

Yes, always declare. If you get caught with it and you don't declare it, you'll be marked as a "smuggler" and that will stay on your file for years. Every time you travel, they'll see that and you'll be more likely to be stopped. It happened to a few people I know. Also, if you want to apply for Nexus or Global Entry, you'll probably be denied.


4

Yes, you have to declare it. Here is the form. There is no ambiguity ("including gifts for someone else" or "will remain in the U.S." covers either situation of you being resident or not). I'm not a customs broker (so E&OE), but the harmonized tariff code for iPhones appears to be 8517.12.0050, which would appear to be free of duty. Your friend may ...


1

In all but the most exceptional circumstances try to tip between 10-20% (even 10 is a bit low) however certain scenarios would definitely lean towards not following this standard, keep reading for my own personal example. I went to a Chili's restaurant for dinner, it wasn't busy at all and we were seated immediately. Our server took our order and then we ...



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