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5

Given the circumstances of your application and the recent change of US law, I think it is most likely that your ESTA application has landed on someone's desk for review by a human being. The new law makes people who have visited Iraq since 2011 ineligible for an ESTA, with some exceptions. I think it is most likely that someone is meant to determine ...


1

Yes. When you return to the United States, the border officer can, and probably will, readmit you under your original 90-day stay: Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to the United States under the VWP, you may take a short trip to Canada, Mexico, or a nearby island and generally be readmitted to the United States under ...


3

You should have no trouble with this. You certainly are not the first person to acquire a new citizenship after visiting the US, so they are used to it happening. As long as you fill out all the question correctly on your ESTA (which you need if you enter by air or sea) and/or VWP application, and tell them about your previous citizenships if asked, you ...


1

They will most likely have to leave the US by the 90th day after their first arrival. In other words, their second stay will most likely be limited to a month and a half. See the State Department's web site (https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visa-waiver-program.html): Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to ...


2

Yes, it's fine. If you travel back to the UK, in fact, or anywhere other than Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean, your subsequent visit should be on a new 90-day period, so you could be in the US for 60 days, in the UK for two weeks, and then in the US for 30 days or even 45 or 60. If you travel for a short time to an adjacent country, however, your ...


3

There should be absolutely no problem with doing what you propose. You are correct that "travelling into a bordering country doesn't count as leaving the US for the purpose of the 90 day stay limit", but it does count as "leaving the US". In particular, since you are flying internationally from Portland to Vancouver, the US CBP will get a record that you ...


2

What you are planning to do complies with the rules. There is no "minimum waiting time" until you can re-enter under the visa waiver program after an expired J-1 visa (and after your DS-2019 expired), provided that your reason for visiting the US is OK with the VWP rules. Yet, it is very much advisable to bring all documentation that you can provide to show ...


0

There is no official rule for this, although there is a rule of thumb according to CBP. This is that if one spends X days in the US on the VWP, one should wait at least X+1 days before seeking to re-enter the US. Quoting from this Travel.SE answer on the topic: the important paragraph reads: The Visa Waiver Program doesn't work that way. ...


1

Travel plans are subject to change, and the CBP know this. Indeed one can even apply for an ESTA with provisional, if not indefinite, plans. If admitted for entry in the US under the Visa Waiver Program, you'll be authorised to stay for a maximum of 90 days. The important thing is not overstaying, rather than extending a provisional travel plan. When the ...


13

What Is the US Visa Waiver Program? The US Visa Waiver Program (VWP) allows travellers of certain nationalities to visit the US for tourism or business purposes without the need for a visa, for a maximum of 90 days. This is a bilateral agreement, meaning that all countries participating in the VWP must allow US citizens to visit for tourism or business ...


8

The short answer is no, you cannot stay for 100 days using the ESTA and the Visa Waiver Program. You will have to apply for a visa or change your travel plans. The longer answer involves clearing up a lot of misunderstandings - primarily about what an ESTA (and the related VWP) is. See this question for a full description. The ESTA does not allow you to ...



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