New answers tagged

2

If your passport has the biometric symbol on the front cover, you should not have a problem using it to enter the US. If you are still concerned and you have or know someone with an NFC equipped Android phone, you can download apps from the Google play store that can read the passport information including your photograph over NFC. e.g. this one, although ...


-1

Going for that visa was extremely stupid of you. You had a valid ESTA and should've travelled - no one would've raised an eyebrow. Now it's likely that the embassy has forwarded the Details to the CBP, so that once you land, you'll get sent back with a 10-year entry ban,


2

The answer would appear to be no. The US State department offers this flier on business travel to the US suitable for the B-1 Visa (and by extension the VWP) on their website about the VWP. While some of the activities you describe (meetings etc) would fall under the B-1, there is always the note of "no income from a US-based company", which you will be ...


18

You don't spend time in USA "under an ESTA" -- ESTA is an authorization to travel to the USA, and only for that. Once you've gotten there, you will be staying as a nonimmigrant alien admitted under the Visa Waiver Program. See this Question and Answer for more information. An ESTA is generally valid for 2 years or until your passport expires, whichever ...


4

To travel under VWP, travel purpose must be permitted on a visitor (B) visa, as mentioned as the first point in the Visa Waiver Program page. This means, your ESTA is basically a simplified B1/B2 visa, same rules apply, the difference is the process only. Now, checking the rules for both B1 and B2 visas lists nothing about your specific "writing" purpose, ...


1

Canada isn't part of any "ESTA area"; ESTA concerns just the US. There's a regulation aimed at preventing people from resetting their ESTA duration-of-stay clock by making short trips to Canada, the Caribbean, or Mexico, but you don't need to be concerned about that because you're not doing that. Rather, you are residing temporarily in Canada, and ...


8

Given the circumstances of your application and the recent change of US law, I think it is most likely that your ESTA application has landed on someone's desk for review by a human being. The new law makes people who have visited Iraq since 2011 ineligible for an ESTA, with some exceptions. I think it is most likely that someone is meant to determine ...


1

Yes. When you return to the United States, the border officer can, and probably will, readmit you under your original 90-day stay: Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to the United States under the VWP, you may take a short trip to Canada, Mexico, or a nearby island and generally be readmitted to the United States under ...


3

You should have no trouble with this. You certainly are not the first person to acquire a new citizenship after visiting the US, so they are used to it happening. As long as you fill out all the question correctly on your ESTA (which you need if you enter by air or sea) and/or VWP application, and tell them about your previous citizenships if asked, you ...


1

They will most likely have to leave the US by the 90th day after their first arrival. In other words, their second stay will most likely be limited to a month and a half. See the State Department's web site (https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visa-waiver-program.html): Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to ...


2

Yes, it's fine. If you travel back to the UK, in fact, or anywhere other than Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean, your subsequent visit should be on a new 90-day period, so you could be in the US for 60 days, in the UK for two weeks, and then in the US for 30 days or even 45 or 60. If you travel for a short time to an adjacent country, however, your ...



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