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2

As of November 1 2012 citizens of Taiwan may travel to the US under the Visa Waiver program. There are no additional requirements for Taiwanese citizens over and above other visa waiver countries.


1

I see no reason why you should not be able to use ESTA - you have to however fulfill their terms, such as not change status, not work, leave the country, etc. Since you're not planning to work during your US visit and you're going to leave to Bahamas, ESTA should work for you. The only thing you may look into is when your visa is granted. AFAIK, you cannot ...


4

Assuming you are Dutch, basically I think you are right and the Dutch Embassy spokesperson was wrong: CBP: When traveling to the U.S. with the approved ESTA, you may only stay for up to 90 days at a time - and there should be a reasonable amount of time between visits so that the CBP Officer does not think you are trying to live here. There is no set ...


8

It's always the current name, since this is what she's legally known as. Any records - criminal, legal, etc that they might want to look up - or to check your back story, that's how they'd find her. Almost without fail, if they want the maiden name, they'll specify so.


5

It is the name she goes by. If your mother has been known as Jane Smith for 50 years, the fact that she was born Jane Jones is not of interest to the visa people. Of course, why her current name is of interest to them escapes me.


5

If she is married to your father and took his family name then as @pnuts said it's an convention to write this family name if it is not the case then I can't help you sorry. The guidance about Parents is not specific on this point: Enter the names of your parents. These are required to complete the application. If you do not know the name of one or ...


7

It may sound strange, as many travelers here point out that they never been asked if they brought enough money while entering the US. But the U.S. Customs and Border Protection states that: Travelers visiting the U.S. must be able to prove to a CBP Officer that they have sufficient funds (i.e. credit cards, cash, travelers checks, money orders etc.) ...


5

Your friend will need "access to sufficient funds to support themselves during their stay". This can be as low as "nothing" if a local resident is waiting outside to pick them up, "access" in this example being your wallet. A lot will depend on what the immigration agent thinks of your friend (and/or you) when they approach the desk. Clothing, accessories, ...


2

I've travelled to the US from Ireland 10+ times on a visa waiver programme (ESTA) and never asked about my funds or cash at immigration. I almost always travel with no USD$ (sometimes I have about $50 for emergency's, sometimes $0), just my credit and debit cards. Never been a problem. Never been asked ANYTHING about funds. But, I am a 40y/o white guy from ...


8

I traveled to the USA this December from South Africa and they did not check how much cash I had. I actually had 0 dollars on me. All I had was my credit and cheque cards that I could use across America. There was no issue. So unless you find some text on the visa website you do not need to have hard cash with you at the time of entrance.


22

Enough to support yourself for that period of time you're in the country. It's frustrating, but there's no fixed number. They'll likely ask your friend about her trip, where she's going, what she's booked and how she'll support herself. It's just to make sure that she's thought through how much she'll need to spend and support herself, without getting into ...


2

Unlike many other places, the US does not provide any facilities for airside transit so you need to have the right to enter the country in any case. Technically you don't necessarily need a visa for that but you do need something. As a UK citizen, you can probably apply for an electronic authorization (apply through the ESTA) and benefit from the “Visa ...


4

You need to bring your passport, which is the only TSA-approved foreign ID for flying in the US. And that's it, really. On booking, you'll be asked for name, age and contact details, but none of this is checked or verified. At the airport, all they'll do is verify that the name on your ticket matches the name on your ID.



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