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17

There's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily, and leaving permanently, which is as much as anything dictated by you returning to your place of residence. If you are in the US under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and you leave the US for a few weeks to visit Canada (or Mexico) with an intent to return to the US then you are deemed to ...


15

Speaking from first-hand experience, I can say with certainty that YES, you CAN use the VWP in order to enter the US to attend a job interview, either for a job in the US or for a job outside of the US. A VWP is functionally equivalent to a B1/B2 visa (they often actually write B1 or B2 on the entry stamp to designate this!), and there are no other visas ...


12

No, this is not accurate. I'm from New Zealand and therefore am eligible for the Visa Waiver Program (see list of countries). In 2010 I flew in from Bogota, Colombia - which is NOT on the list of countries, and it was absolutely fine. They don't care where you came from, only what your passport says.(*) (*) - note however that this does not prevent a ...


9

There's no requirement for the VWP as to which country you are entering from. However, there can be issues when leaving the US, depending on what country he's returning to. When departing the US, he will need to show the airline his passport. There's two purposes for this - firstly it's so that the airline can confirm that he has a visa/citizenship/etc ...


9

Yes. From the US Embassy in Australia's website: Question: Can I travel to the United States on the Visa Waiver Program to find a job or attend interviews and then apply for the E-3 visa once I return to Australia? Answer: Yes, you can travel on the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) if you meet the requirements (please see our page on the Visa ...


9

No. Firstly, note that you'll likely be required to get a visa at the border with the US, even though you're in the visa-waiver countries for ESTA - it apparently only counts for flights, or within 90 days of a flight into the US if arriving by land(!) as I found out, twice. However, leaving the country there's not even a passport check - you simply need ...


8

There's a convenient page on the ESTA program website: When my ESTA expires how do I renew my application? If your ESTA has expired, you must reapply for a brand new authorization by submitting a new application. Current authorizations can not be extended. Go to ESTA.cbp.gov, follow the instructions to answer all of the required questions and submit a new ...


8

According to CBP you cannot extend your stay for more then 30 days and even then in the case of emergency. The good news is that noone yet canceled availability of B1/B2 visas for the citizens of VWP countries. So if you obtain a B2 visa, which you shouldn't have a problem doing you can enter the US for the period of 6 months and hike one of the trails ...


8

A link on the Visa Waiver Program page (under "Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands") points to the Closed Loop Voyages page from the CBP. According to this page, the definitions of Contiguous Territories and Adjacent Islands is: Contiguous Territories are any country sharing a common boundary with the United States. Canada and Mexico are ...


7

You can reuse the ESTA for two years or until your passport expires, whichever comes first. http://newzealand.usembassy.gov/fp_esta_vwp.html


7

Yes, you can. When re-entering the US just make sure that they are aware that you have a visa and are entering using that rather than the VWP. (Now that there are no longer I94 forms when entering by air, it's worth mentioning this every time you pass through immigration - especially given that you likely also have an active ESTA) Presuming you are ...


7

As an Australian, you do not need a visa for Canada, and you can stay for up to six months. This is regardless of whether you visited the US before and how long you stayed; they're separate countries, after all. Your problem is going to be returning to the United States from Canada, because once you enter the US on a visa waiver, your "90 day" clock does ...


6

It all comes down to a 'reasonable length of time' between stays. Now that's about as ambiguous as they come - what's reasonable? It's like this on purpose - it's up to the official at the border, as the purpose of this is to try and work out if you're trying to live in the states and just border hopping every 90 days, instead of visiting. From the CBP ...


6

There won't be any issue, just maybe a bit of a hassle. The Visa Waiver Program functions differently for air and land travel since the introduction of ESTA. Since you plan to do both, you will need to go through both procedures. Arriving by plane: At least two weeks before your journey go to the ESTA homepage and fill out the electronic form. Note that ...


6

As you are staying less than 3 months in North America, there will be no problem. When you enter the US the first time, you'll have to fill a small green paper, the I-94. This form should be given back when you leave the US, and it is a proof you actually left US territory. So you will not give it back when you go to Vancouver, but when you leave Seattle ...


6

Let's get the easy question out of the way first. Yes, you will need to buy your ticket to South America before you depart for the US. One of the conditions of entering under the VWP is that you have either a return or onward ticket out of the US within 90 days of entry. This will normally be enforced by the airline, and if you do not have such a ticket ...


6

1) Yes. Reporting is all automated. The airlines notify the US government when the person left the country, which is then matched against the record created when they entered and passed through immigration. 2) Your friend is no longer eligible to use the Visa Waiver Program. One of the conditions of the VWP is that you must have "complied with all ...


6

Canadians can stay up to six months from the entry date before they need to leave the US and re-enter. If you want to stay longer you can request an extension, from the Visa Waiver Program official page: If you are from Canada, the length of stay for tourism is up to 6 months. Canadians may file for an extension of stay with the U.S. Citizenship and ...


6

There is no official answer to your question. Technically when you leave the US and travel to a country other than Mexico or Canada (or some locations in the Caribbean) your current VWP entry will end, and when you re-enter a period of time later you will be given a new VWP, with another 90 days of validity. However, as with any time that you are entering ...


5

According to Georgia, Iran visa-free mechanism to take effect on Jan. 26 The citizens will be able to stay in the country for up to 45 days


5

This is how I understand this works: After you arrived in the US, you have 90 days to stay before you have to leave. If within the 90 days you go into Mexico or Canada and want to come back to the US (which by going to Alaska is something you plan to do) you don't reset your 90 days. In other words you have to finish the whole trip from the Mexico border up ...


5

I've never been in the exact situation you describe, but Visa Waivers are a very low-maintenence way to get in. My advice would be to explain to the immigration officer when you go into the US. I'm pretty sure the answer will be that they will give you a new I94W on the spot (with of course a new fee, if they still do that). You backup plan would be that ...


5

You can not apply for a US Visa from within the US - it needs to be done outside of the country. In general the best place to apply is in her home country (Australia, I presume). It's also possible to apply via the US consulate at any other country, however it may take longer for the application to be processed, and there may be a higher chance of being ...


5

You should not rely on US Government to act on this in 2014. It is far more likely that if it will happen in 2014 it will be late in the year and it might be better to apply and get a B visa instead of waiting for VWP to happen. There is a recommendation by the State Department to the Santiago embassy to: Informal Recommendation 20: Embassy Santiago ...


5

This is a curious case which will need to be addressed by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate. Costa Rica provides a waiver of visa for people who have a visa with at least one day validity stamped in their passport. This is the same text that exists for the holders of the US Student (F, J) or work (H, G, etc) visas (sorry can't copy the exact text for some ...


5

It is legal to look for work whilst in the US under the Visa Waiver Program, however it is NOT legal to actually work whilst on the WVP. If he is offered any form of employment within the US he will need to return to his home country and apply for a work visa for the US. Depending on the specific situation, obtaining such a visa will be somewhere between ...


5

Not at all. If you're getting the ESTA/VWP, it's valid for 90 days travel (there are some weird laws about exiting and coming back in, all has to be done within 90 days if you're doing Canada/Mexico as well), but 46 days is half that! To have a smooth transition, you'll want to have proof of onward travel, address of your first few nights' accommodation if ...


5

Yes, the U.S. accepts bus tickets as onward travel. I've used it myself. They were even OK accepting a bus ticket from Seattle to Vancouver when I flew into Boston. The trick you'll have though is that you're running very close to the 90 days limit on the VWP, which does not reset if you go to Canada. As a result, if you stay any later than three months ...


5

Technically neither Canada or Mexico reset the VWP, so it doesn't matter how long you're there for - you will still need to convince the customs and border protection officer that you're not trying to cheat the system: If you go to Canada and Mexico or the Caribbean, and while you are there, your initial 90-day period of entry expires, but you need to ...


5

The problem is that on the VWP, you have is that the 90 day limit doesn't reset if you visit Mexico or Canada - see other questions on the site - eg. 90 Day rule on the US Visa Waiver Program not expiring if you go to Canada To reset it properly you'd need to travel further afield - there's more information on the CBP website. The main goal they have is to ...



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