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14

There's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily, and leaving permanently, which is as much as anything dictated by you returning to your place of residence. If you are in the US under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and you leave the US for a few weeks to visit Canada (or Mexico) with an intent to return to the US then you are deemed to ...


14

Speaking from first-hand experience, I can say with certainty that YES, you CAN use the VWP in order to enter the US to attend a job interview, either for a job in the US or for a job outside of the US. A VWP is functionally equivalent to a B1/B2 visa (they often actually write B1 or B2 on the entry stamp to designate this!), and there are no other visas ...


12

No, this is not accurate. I'm from New Zealand and therefore am eligible for the Visa Waiver Program (see list of countries). In 2010 I flew in from Bogota, Colombia - which is NOT on the list of countries, and it was absolutely fine. They don't care where you came from, only what your passport says.(*) (*) - note however that this does not prevent a ...


9

There's no requirement for the VWP as to which country you are entering from. However, there can be issues when leaving the US, depending on what country he's returning to. When departing the US, he will need to show the airline his passport. There's two purposes for this - firstly it's so that the airline can confirm that he has a visa/citizenship/etc ...


9

Yes. From the US Embassy in Australia's website: Question: Can I travel to the United States on the Visa Waiver Program to find a job or attend interviews and then apply for the E-3 visa once I return to Australia? Answer: Yes, you can travel on the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) if you meet the requirements (please see our page on the Visa ...


8

According to CBP you cannot extend your stay for more then 30 days and even then in the case of emergency. The good news is that noone yet canceled availability of B1/B2 visas for the citizens of VWP countries. So if you obtain a B2 visa, which you shouldn't have a problem doing you can enter the US for the period of 6 months and hike one of the trails ...


7

As an Australian, you do not need a visa for Canada, and you can stay for up to six months. This is regardless of whether you visited the US before and how long you stayed; they're separate countries, after all. Your problem is going to be returning to the United States from Canada, because once you enter the US on a visa waiver, your "90 day" clock does ...


6

Let's get the easy question out of the way first. Yes, you will need to buy your ticket to South America before you depart for the US. One of the conditions of entering under the VWP is that you have either a return or onward ticket out of the US within 90 days of entry. This will normally be enforced by the airline, and if you do not have such a ticket ...


6

As you are staying less than 3 months in North America, there will be no problem. When you enter the US the first time, you'll have to fill a small green paper, the I-94. This form should be given back when you leave the US, and it is a proof you actually left US territory. So you will not give it back when you go to Vancouver, but when you leave Seattle ...


6

Yes, you can. When re-entering the US just make sure that they are aware that you have a visa and are entering using that rather than the VWP. (Now that there are no longer I94 forms when entering by air, it's worth mentioning this every time you pass through immigration - especially given that you likely also have an active ESTA) Presuming you are ...


6

There is no official answer to your question. Technically when you leave the US and travel to a country other than Mexico or Canada (or some locations in the Caribbean) your current VWP entry will end, and when you re-enter a period of time later you will be given a new VWP, with another 90 days of validity. However, as with any time that you are entering ...


5

It all comes down to a 'reasonable length of time' between stays. Now that's about as ambiguous as they come - what's reasonable? It's like this on purpose - it's up to the official at the border, as the purpose of this is to try and work out if you're trying to live in the states and just border hopping every 90 days, instead of visiting. From the CBP ...


5

There won't be any issue, just maybe a bit of a hassle. The Visa Waiver Program functions differently for air and land travel since the introduction of ESTA. Since you plan to do both, you will need to go through both procedures. Arriving by plane: At least two weeks before your journey go to the ESTA homepage and fill out the electronic form. Note that ...


5

1) Yes. Reporting is all automated. The airlines notify the US government when the person left the country, which is then matched against the record created when they entered and passed through immigration. 2) Your friend is no longer eligible to use the Visa Waiver Program. One of the conditions of the VWP is that you must have "complied with all ...


5

I've never been in the exact situation you describe, but Visa Waivers are a very low-maintenence way to get in. My advice would be to explain to the immigration officer when you go into the US. I'm pretty sure the answer will be that they will give you a new I94W on the spot (with of course a new fee, if they still do that). You backup plan would be that ...


5

This is how I understand this works: After you arrived in the US, you have 90 days to stay before you have to leave. If within the 90 days you go into Mexico or Canada and want to come back to the US (which by going to Alaska is something you plan to do) you don't reset your 90 days. In other words you have to finish the whole trip from the Mexico border up ...


5

You can not apply for a US Visa from within the US - it needs to be done outside of the country. In general the best place to apply is in her home country (Australia, I presume). It's also possible to apply via the US consulate at any other country, however it may take longer for the application to be processed, and there may be a higher chance of being ...


5

From this related question - Do I need a US visa to change planes in an American airport? Unlike many other countries, US airport do not have any form on physical immigration controls when you are departing the country on an international flight. In fact, in most airports there isn't even a concept of an "International" terminal/gate, with the same gates ...


5

You should not rely on US Government to act on this in 2014. It is far more likely that if it will happen in 2014 it will be late in the year and it might be better to apply and get a B visa instead of waiting for VWP to happen. There is a recommendation by the State Department to the Santiago embassy to: Informal Recommendation 20: Embassy Santiago ...


5

This is a curious case which will need to be addressed by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate. Costa Rica provides a waiver of visa for people who have a visa with at least one day validity stamped in their passport. This is the same text that exists for the holders of the US Student (F, J) or work (H, G, etc) visas (sorry can't copy the exact text for some ...


5

It is legal to look for work whilst in the US under the Visa Waiver Program, however it is NOT legal to actually work whilst on the WVP. If he is offered any form of employment within the US he will need to return to his home country and apply for a work visa for the US. Depending on the specific situation, obtaining such a visa will be somewhere between ...


4

Assuming that you are leaving the USA in time with a valid visa and were not "removed" as they call it, you should be able to enter the USA with either passport (As long as they are both eligible for the VWP) for the purpose of tourism or doing business - not to work or study. Selling a car, ending a lease is doing business. Visiting your friends is ...


4

There's a convenient page on the ESTA program website: When my ESTA expires how do I renew my application? If your ESTA has expired, you must reapply for a brand new authorization by submitting a new application. Current authorizations can not be extended. Go to ESTA.cbp.gov, follow the instructions to answer all of the required questions and submit a new ...


4

As @Doc states on this answer - there's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily (eg quick trip to Canada) and permanently - like returning to your home country. If you are leaving US to return to your place of residence, then you are leaving permanently. In this case your VWP period would end when you left the country, and historically ...


4

There are no specific requirements for the period of time until you can re-enter the US after a previous visit on the VWP. Technically there is nothing that would have stopped you from re-entering the US on the 17th of September, or any date after that. However entry is always at the discretion of the immigration officials at your point of entry. If they ...


4

The Visa Waiver Program only allows you to stay in the US for a maximum of 90 days. Once you are inside the US, there is no way to extend this (You could have applied for a visa before your stay commenced, but you can't do that once you're in the US). Your only option is to leave the US, and return - but odds are that even this will cause issues. If you ...


4

The duration of stay in the US is not a function of ESTA but a function of VWP which allows you as a citizen of Australia 90 days to stay in the US. You can apply for new ESTA 30 days before your current one expires, however, validity of ESTA is 2 years so for 2 years you can enter the US under Visa Waiver Program and each time stay for a total of 90 days. ...


4

Unless you haven't paid the fine and now have a warrant outstanding I wouldn't worry about it. Traffic offenses are only a concern if you have committed something serious like a vehicular manslaughter or if you basically ignored the summons or mandatory court appearance and now have a warrant issued for your arrest. CBP discusses the subject of crimes but ...


3

You should not be using the VWP to enter the US as a visiting scholar. The VWP comes instead of B1/B2, while the status you're interested in is J1. You should get a proper visa and then you won't have to worry about what happens if you get caught breaking the terms of your stay. Since apparently there's a lot of ignorance on the matter, here's the official ...



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