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United States nationals can enter the Schengen Area for stays of up to 90 days and travel freely within the area, as long as their total time spent in all Schengen countries does not exceed 90 days in any 180-day period. So your son will not need a visa at all. If he leaves the Schengen Area (such as to go to the United Kingdom) whether he needs a visa ...


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It is a gray area, and to get a definitive answer, you will have to send a complete list of equipment and shooting sites to a Guatemalan lawyer. Most landscape photographers I know travel around on tourist visa, although this is not completely legal. But they were never caught, mainly because they won't carry that much equipment, since artificial lighting ...


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The short answer is no. Travel to Mexico by land or sea without a passport is possible if you have a Passport Card , (or other Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative document) but unfortunately travel on a passport card explicitly excludes international air travel. From the WHTI site - WHTI document requirements for air travel went into effect in ...


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Yes, you need to bring your birth certificate to the consulate. Also, check the regulations specific to Mexico. For me, the required process was: Mail the passport, original birth certificate, and application form to the embassy using a specific courier. No flexibility on this. The embassy was serving many walk-ins by sending them to a counter inside ...


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To answer parts 2 & 3, your passport, visa application and supporting documents must be delivered by hand to the Chinese Embassy or Consulate covering the area you reside it. You don't have to physically do this, you can have a visa agency handle the physical aspects. I have used China Visa Service Center ( http://www.mychinavisa.com/ ) in the past for ...


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When you come back into the country where you live (as a permanent resident or citizen), they have to let you in - eventually. But they may want to ask you a few things first, for a variety of reasons: they want to be sure you're really you, not someone you met in Pakistan and handed your passport to (or someone who robbed or tricked you), as a way to ...


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This is common if you are visiting not only from Pakistan but other countries as well. You are in your 20s this happened also to a friend's father who was a retired UN officer (of Pakistani origin) residing in the US for the past 40+ years. So, take heart that its not only you. As Pakistan is a country that people visit to transit into Afghanistan and ...


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It's the job of customs and immigration to establish your purpose for visit, and whether you're doing what you say you're doing. If they have any doubts, questions or are merely curious, they can and will as part of their job, ask you questions. Naturally this should be only about your plans in the country - if they start asking personal, potentially ...



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