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1

The US State Department website indicates (updated after the executive order): The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer all travel to the eastern regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. In addition, Russian military forces continue to occupy the Crimean Peninsula and are present on the eastern border of Ukraine. It does not explicitly ban it, ...


21

The fact that you're newlywed is irrelevant. What is important is that you are one family travelling together. I've been in exact this situation before. I am an American citizen and my wife is not. Whenever we fly to the USA, we'd go through the immigration together - through the lanes for "Non-US passports". We give two passports together - mine and ...


5

With connections, money and time, it's possible for an American citizen to visit every single country in the world. Proof: Chris Guillebeau from Portland, Oregon, completed this feat by age 35, a couple of years back. He visited 193/193 UN countries, including South Sudan (which was new at the time). Of course there are bases, private property and more ...


1

The US State Department keeps a page on travel warnings for US Citizens: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/alertswarnings.html So there is one possible source. But as others pointed out, the answer to your question is somewhat subjective and depends on how what you define as sufficiently safe.


4

The definitive source for this is the UK government website, . Unfortunately there is no precise answer to your question. The UK government rules require that the visitor does not >"intend to live for extended periods in the United Kingdom through frequent or successive visits", which means that you can't enter for 6 months, skip the country to (say) ...


1

I'm a US citizen and I just had a layover in Shanghai this past December. Actually had to switch planes and carriers. Neither carrier cared about any of it--I was totally on my own. The airport immigration staff just asked to see my printout of my ticket and passport--that was it.


4

This is what the law says (8 USC 1185(b), also known as INA 215(b)): Except as otherwise provided by the President and subject to such limitations and exceptions as the President may authorize and prescribe, it shall be unlawful for any citizen of the United States to depart from or enter, or attempt to depart from or enter, the United States ...


4

To enter Canada, yes, it's true, you can just use birth certificate and photo ID (source) From the Department of State's website on travel to/from Canada, for returning to the US, you'll have to do it by land. By air: When traveling by air from Canada, U.S. citizens are required by U.S. law to present a U.S. passport while by land: For entry ...


0

You don't need any visa. Just go to transit desk tell them what flight you arrived on and what flight you depart on and they will transfer your luggage for you. Once they (transfer desk staff) will contact someone from depart airlines, they will give you boarding pass (it can take a while), so you will be able to move on forward to duty free area and the ...


3

China's visa rules are rather simple in this matter, if you are applying for a visa in a country other than your citizenship, then you need to show proof that you are residing / traveling legally in that country. If you can not prove that you are in the USA legally using your Irish passport, then you have no choice but to apply with your US passport. While ...


1

Being British and living in Moscow fifteen years on and off I will say it is far safer than London (the city I was born and raised in). Even the Militsia seem to be approachable nowadays and Moscow has just gotten 200 Tourist police (50% speak fluent English) with many more to come. It's safe and it is awesome.



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