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192

In general, a genuine invitation is concrete, containing information that helps to make it happen. "Would you like to get lunch tomorrow?" is an invitation, and could be followed up with "Yes, how about [restaurant]?" or "Yes, do you have a place in mind?" to accept. If you responded instead with "No, but we should meet some other time," that could be a ...


97

There is an essay which explains the difference between "polite" and "direct" cultures. First of all: For members of the Anglosphere like Americans, Britons and Canadians the Germans are using the term "Angelsachsen" (Anglo-Saxons) which is slightly different from the meaning in English, it especially has a more humorous connotation like "Teuton" for ...


32

Here's an excerpt from Wikitravel: Although many visitors, especially Americans, may feel apprehensive about visiting Hiroshima, it is a friendly, welcoming city, with as much interest in Western culture as anywhere else in Japan. Tourists are welcomed, and exhibits related to the atomic bomb are not concerned with blame or accusations. Bear in mind, ...


24

As far as my understanding goes, you can visit Cuba, but you cannot spend money there. The USA has an embargo on Cuba. Wikipedia has a pretty solid article on it. You need a license to actually participate in commerce... but since that includes buying food you in essence cannot go to Cuba. Licenses are released however. I have a Cuban uncle who goes back ...


20

(This is going to over-simplify things a little, but...) Technically, as a US citizen you are covered by the laws of the US regardless of where in the world you are. However with very few exceptions, when you are outside of the US you are outside of the jurisdiction of those laws. ie, if you're a 19 year old US citizen and you're drinking in Australia then ...


20

I am curious, though, if a US citizen could potentially* be prosecuted upon returning home for "breaking US laws while on foreign soil". Yes. The U.S. maintains embargoes against several countries, the best known of which is Cuba. Many of these include travel restrictions. It is illegal, for example, for a U.S. person to use U.S. currency or a ...


19

Firstly keep in mind that the answer to this question will vary significantly depending on the countries involved. Some countries (eg, the US) have requirements that if you are a citizen you MUST enter using the passport of that country. So as a US/UK citizen you must always use your US passport when entering the US. The UK does NOT have such a ...


18

You don't need a passport to fly within the US. As long as you have your driver's license, that is enough to get you through TSA check points. It's when you travel outside the US that you will need your passport.


18

To me, the key is the specificity of the invitation. The vaguest, of course, say "some time" - this is a bright light signalling that it is not a real invitation. "We should do lunch some time" means absolutely nothing at all. Similarly claims to "owe you" a beer or a coffee do not constitute an offer to deliver that item, nor an invitation to go, now or in ...


14

Germany is part of the Schengen area, so the visa requirements are the same as for any of the Schengen countries (i.e. most of the EU, excluding the UK and Ireland) As a US passport holder, you can spend up to 90 days in any half year period in the Schengen area without need of a visa, provided you're not working. See the wikipedia page for a good ...


14

A quick scan of Wikivoyage's guide to Hiroshima sights indicate that memorials and museums to the attack have English-language information. If they didn't intend non-Japanese to visit the place, they wouldn't have such information. I seriously doubt that they'd regard the USA differently from other non-Japanese countries in this context, even though the USA ...


13

As far as I know, visiting Cuba without a permission from U.S. Department of the Treasury is illegal. Title 31--Money and Finance: Treasury CHAPTER V--OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY PART 515--CUBAN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS (I wonder if posting this information here is also illegal...) Even if you do have permission, some ...


12

If you hold more than one passport, you're supposed to only be consistent with what you do in a country. So enter on one, leave on the other is a no-no, but you're fully entitled - as a US Citizen, to visit the UK. I did the same when visiting South Africa - my friends were in the 'tourist' queue, and I had both passports with me, but went through the ...


12

You could simply get an International Driving Permit. This, coupled with your US Driver's license, is recognised in over 70 countries. The American Automobile Association and the American Automobile Touring Alliance's National Automobile Club as the only entities in the United States to issue IDPs. As for recognising your country license, each EU country ...


12

No. It does not make you stateless. The United States government still exists and is recognized by foreign governments. The US government has only closed down some non-essential operations. None of that affects its relationship with other countries or US citizens ability to travel with valid US passports (it may make it harder to get/renew a US passport ...


12

It's perfectly fine. I've been to both Hiroshima and Nagasaki in my (Japanese) high school trip including multiple sessions with hibakushas. There is really no animosity in general. The emphasis of these museums and parks are solely on how horrible nuclear attacks and war is, and how we need to achieve world peace and eliminate all wars. I think most ...


11

The Chinese Emabassy in the UK site refers visa applications to the Chinese Visa Application Service Center. According to this site, they have locations in London, Manchester, Stockholm, Gothenburg, Copenhagen, The Hague, Brussels, Paris, Marseilles, Milan, Rome and Madrid. The terms of their online application state that applicants must be a citizen or ...


11

I am most familiar with the US Embassy in Delhi, India, since I was there for an extended period of time (several months). You can always visit the website for the US Embassy wherever you are traveling; they post a complete list of services for American citizens. To summarize some of the big ones, US Embassies will help American citizens with the following: ...


11

Caveat up front: I have not yet actually done this, but I am planning a long trip of this sort myself and have been researching this question in depth. The key thing to know is that there is a significant difference between "travel" health insurance and international health insurance. The former is designed as a supplement to the full coverage you have at ...


11

I am a British subject with the right of abode. I had a British passport for a long time but stopped renewing it. I am also a Canadian citizen with a Canadian passport. When I enter Britain, about half the time the customs officer asks me if I am British (coming to a country to visit your sister, for example, will get you asked that) and when I say "well, I ...


11

I have a friend of a friend who used a prepaid AMIGO TRAVEL CLUB card in Cuba. They are a bank in Antigua and he was able to open an account online as an American citizen. I think this also involved e-mailing them a copy of his passport and driver's license. Once the account is open, you can charge the account by wire transfer from your bank and then ...


11

Where you're from is likely irrelevant. Overstaying is overstaying, you're not going to get treated more harshly or kindly because of who your president/king/prime minister is. There's a great piece "Overstaying Schengen visa" that is relevant to this. Consequences of overstaying This could result in a: no consequence - if you're lucky, and this will ...


11

Absolutely not an issue. Just to give a first-hand perspective (though the other 2 answers both excellently cover the 'why not'), I visited the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum and the Peace Park a few years back, and at no point did I feel any ill-will or awkwardness. As with any similar place as long as you are respectful you are welcome - the staff were as ...


11

There are several factors that come into play here. Some cultures have a significant amount of politeness as a social lubricant. Even when it doesn't mean you should, it is still said. A classic example of this is Japan's politeness (though this is simplifying a very large concept). There is an entire school of sociology called politeness theory. ...


10

I can't answer specifically about Ukraine or Lithuania, but in many other similar situations I've never had a problem.


10

I was in the same situation a year ago. It took me about 4 weeks to receive my Passport in the mail. Keep in mind, that you will need to send your original birth certificate with your passport application so you will be without that while you wait. According to Consular Affairs, it takes 4-6 weeks for routine service but you can opt for expedited service. ...


10

There is an absolute requirement that either both parents are present when applying for the US passport or a Consent is given by one of the parent's: Minors under age 16 cannot apply for a passport by themselves. Both parents/guardians must appear in person with the minor and provide consent, authorizing passport issuance to the minor. If one ...


10

No, US citizens do not need a visa to enter the Schengen area. You may stay for up to 90 days in any 180 day period without a visa. For further information, see Visa policies in the European Union.


9

I believe it depends on the issuing authority, but usually about two weeks if you pay the fee to have it expedited. You really can't ask for a definitive time, because it also depends on how busy they are. I have friends who paid the fee and got their passports renewed in just under two weeks, but that was a few years ago. If you were born outside of the US ...


9

The US dept of state website usually has all the information you need for any country. Just go here http://travel.state.gov/travel/travel_1744.html and select the country. Here is a link to the section on entry and exit requirements for Germany: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1123.html#entry_requirements Here is what it says: ENTRY / ...



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