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19

Airlines have policies for passengers who are larger than their seats, whom they most commonly refer to as "customers of size". You can find more info on some standard policies in this airfarewatchdog blog post. Some airlines ask you buy two adjacent seats (economy airline seats generally resemble a bench for three people - you can easily sit across two ...


9

From the US Airways web site: Aircraft seating configuration For information about aircraft seating configuration, please the map shown during the booking process on our website (usairways.com.) Customers may also request information regarding our general aircraft configuration at any time by calling US Airways Reservations at 800-428-4322. US ...


9

Yes, they are both members of the Star Alliance. So, for being gold on USAirways, you are automatically "Star Gold," across the entire Star Alliance network. The benefit of first class upgrades (unfortunately) is NOT one that you will be able to get when flying on Continental. That being said, most other benefits are reciprocal. For example, priority ...


9

I don't believe that the Continental and US Airways programs are directly integrated. It looks like you can earn US Airways miles on some Continental tickets. US Airways and Continental are Star Alliance carriers. So, if you're a member of one of their frequent traveller programs (with sufficient status) then you'll get benefits on other Star Alliance ...


7

Unfortunately, Dividend Miles is a "dead-end" program. The WebFlyer Mileage Converter turns up nothing, and even a ruinous Points.com conversion is now impossible. Some of this reflects general cutbacks in frequent flyer programs and some of it reflects the pending merger with American Airlines. Dividend Miles will almost certainly be merged into the much ...


7

As of the weekend of March 28, 2015, miles from US Airways have been merged into the American AAdvantage program (which is the program which will continue on). If you had accounts on both airlines, you were given a chance to link your accounts beforehand; if you only had a US Airways Dividend Miles account, then you were assigned an AAdvantage number. If ...


6

At the moment you cannot earn miles on US Airways in your American Airlines AAdvantage account: At this time, American and US Airways will remain separate companies and each company will maintain its current loyalty program. No-one knows for sure what will ultimately happen with the programs - possibly even American and US Airways at this stage - ...


5

Depends on the airline rules and the fare you booked. Generally, if the ticket is refundable - everything should be refundable. The government doesn't charge fees and taxes if you didn't travel. The airline - might. How to figure the exact fees - your travel agent can probably help you with that, they have that break-down. If you booked online - you might ...


5

I haven't tried it personally, but you might also try moving points back and forth between airlines using something like Points.com.


5

If past merger information is any indication of what will happen you can take a look at recent mergers of United and Continental. The accounts of frequent flyers have been merged into one without the loss of miles. So until the announcement from AA and USAir come out you could operate under the assumption that your miles will remain intact.


4

There are actually three ways your luggage can get from A to B and it's possible that different airlines use different words for it: carry-on. You carry or pull it with you everywhere, including onto the airplane. If it's larger than the limits they publish on the website, you'll be forced to check it and possibly pay the checked bag fee checked. You hand ...


4

You don't say how many points you have or what airlines you normally fly with, but... Firstly, keep in mind that US Airways is likely to merge with American Airlines at some stage in the not to distant future. At that time, the miles for the two programs will merge into one - so if you collect AA miles then these miles would suddenly become useful to you! ...


4

Your title and your question don't match. So I'm not sure what you're asking, but I'll answer both questions. Do I need to check out and check in my baggage again in transit airport? Yes. You must gather your checked bag and pass through US customs at the airport where you enter the country. Then you must re-check your bag (even if on the same airline), ...


4

It's a little bit of a grey area, but as a rule when your flights change due to circumstances beyond your control (including schedule changes like this, delayed flights, etc) then the price you pay - including fees - doesn't change, regardless of any differences in either the fare or taxes. In this case the difference in taxes and fees would be around $11 ...


2

You have two choices: (1) sign up for a US Airways mileage account, be sure that number is on the reservation, and then sit back and wait for the two mileage programs to be merged in 2015, at which point your US Air miles be added to your AAdvantage miles, or (2) credit the US Air flights to your existing AA account and earn the miles immediately. Unless ...


1

Actually my experience tells me, that it is mostly not a matter of the airline. At least in Europe it works pretty well beyond airline, international and intercontinental flights. From my travel experience in Asia, once you change from national to international flights, it happens fairly frequent that you have to collect your luggage. What I remember, if ...


1

I have two very tall sons - 6'4", 270 lbs and 6'6", 240 lbs. The taller one has legroom issues, but fits snugly in the seats. The 6'4" 270 lb guy has more trouble. He can fit "in" the seat with his hips, but his very wide shoulders hang over into the seats on either side of him. He tries to sit by the window, as you can kind of sit a little diagonal, ...


1

There are really 4 ways to get your bag onto the aircraft. Only one of these ways does not involve carrying your bag with you all the way to the boarding gate. That way is to check your bag at the airline check-in counter. Many airlines, including UA, AA, Delta, and U.S. Airways, charge for this service. For U.S. airlines that do charge, the most typical ...


1

Firstly, if he got a stamp in his passport, that may be the easiest - have a look through his passport for entry stamps for August 2009, and that may give you the answer you're after. Second option - try US Airways. With his full name, some other proof of ID, they may be able to locate the flight. Thirdly - did he use a travel agency? They'll likely still ...



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