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10

Most US airports have no concept of "transit" and no "airside" where you can make your connection. You land, clear US customs, and then can go wherever you like, whether that's just over to another terminal to catch your plane, or out into the city to explore. So if you have the paperwork to enable the connection, then you almost certainly have the paperwork ...


5

I did it a month ago, but I had 9 hours between my flights. And I was lucky because I decided to return to the airport earlier than necessary: the CTA derailled and we had to take a bus to return to the O'Hare. You'll spend almost one hour to go downtown, and another hour to return, so you'll have some 3 free hours. I went to the the Chicago Beans (not the ...


5

Firstly I think you have your terminals a little mixed up. Although United has on occasion used terminal B for international arrivals, it's very rare. Almost always flights like UA51 will arrive in terminal C. Your outbound flight will also probably depart from terminal C, so you won't need to change terminals. There is a chance it will depart from ...


5

This answer applies: No, you do not need a visa for going from the US to India via Frankfurt airport (or vice versa), as long as you stay in the transit area and have a connection in less than 12 hours. Lufthansa, emphasis mine: Indian nationals can Transit without Visa via FRA or MUC if holding a valid visa for the destination and a ...


4

There are actually three ways your luggage can get from A to B and it's possible that different airlines use different words for it: carry-on. You carry or pull it with you everywhere, including onto the airplane. If it's larger than the limits they publish on the website, you'll be forced to check it and possibly pay the checked bag fee checked. You hand ...


3

The current United International Route map doesn't show them as flying to New Zealand, so that's out. The "nearest" options for picking up a United plane are Australia or Hawaii. Using the United award travel calculator and the current award chart, you're out of luck on heading to the states from New Zealand, you just don't have enough points for even a ...


3

The physical movement between the two terminals doesn't require much time, maybe 10 minutes. The most time-consuming part of what you're doing is clearing U.S. Customs and Immigration. The time required for that step varies widely, but can take several hours. If you're a U.S. Citizen or resident, plan on having 2-3 hours, just to be on the safe side. Add an ...


3

While it varies from airline to airline, certainly booking through the airline, or a reputable travel agent helps. As a travel coach, if the prices are the same I always send my clients through the airline, because if something goes wrong with the reservation, or in the booking process the airline is much more likely to help rather than route you through ...


3

It is of course possible for two travelers to take the same itinerary, one paying with miles and the other with money, but not on the same reservation. Every person listed on a PNR must use the same fare basis, so you must obtain award tickets and paid tickets in separate reservations/transactions. This is a software limitation that exists, to my knowledge, ...


3

You must book the ticket through United. However any flight partner that can be booked through United is valid. Your specific situation applies to me. I had enough miles on United to book an international flight. I found a flight on United.com that went through Air Canada. They took my miles without a problem and I was able to fly on Air Canada with United ...


3

You can use it to buy a ticket from United. Under certain situations, known as a code share, United will sell you a ticket on an Air Canada plane. They generally won't sell you a ticket from one Canadian city to another unless it's part of a longer itinerary, and Air Canada won't operate a plane from one US city to another, but if you want to go between say ...


2

This is more a "related information" post than an answer per se, but it seems potentially useful enough for those interested in digging to be worth posting as an answer: There is a wealth of information here - Travelocity - FARE RULES - not explanatory per se, but notes on fare rules written for use (it seems) by somebody familiar with the "jargon" ...


2

Yes. Short-range Bluetooth devices including typical headphones, keyboards and mice have been allowed on flights for some time. (Probably since airlines began to provide and sell Wi-Fi internet access.) There have been recent developments that expanded the use of personal electronic devices, Wi-Fi, and short-range Bluetooth during all phases of flight. The ...


2

British Airways was asked (admittedly a while back), and while they don't ban it, they did say it was: "not something we would actively encourage" (source) I haven't seen a more recent source yet :/


1

You can totally do that, you just need to book them on the same departure date and flight number. The one thing that sucks about doing that is usually reward tickets don't allow you to choose a seat in advance, so if they're on separate itineraries, you probably won't be sitting together. Solution, call United after you book, and ask super nicely. ...


1

There are really 4 ways to get your bag onto the aircraft. Only one of these ways does not involve carrying your bag with you all the way to the boarding gate. That way is to check your bag at the airline check-in counter. Many airlines, including UA, AA, Delta, and U.S. Airways, charge for this service. For U.S. airlines that do charge, the most typical ...


1

Getting through immigration usually takes at least half an hour and can often take an hour or more. Getting from O'Hare to downtown is another hour; getting back is yet another hour. You need to be back at O'Hare an hour and a half before your outgoing flight. That only leaves an hour to an hour and a half of your layover for actual sight-seeing.



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