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24

For hotel rooms there is an easy solution: It is called the "hotel safe". Earnestly, do not store important valuables in hotel rooms. Even cheap hotels have very likely a cupboard which is under constant supervision at least at daytime. If you have a rented apartment you have another situation. Burglars and thieves have the following mindset: Break in as ...


21

One of the most effective measures I use frequently when travelling is Kensington lock. It's very likely your laptop already has the appropriate slot, so you need to buy the chain and that's about it. I lock my laptop at any rented place I stay, even if it's a reputable hotel -- no need to take any chances. The cable should fit easily in your hand baggage. ...


19

How did I miss this question?? I've done this! Before it was even considered 'touristy' (we had to apply to the Ukrainian government for permission in 2008). Now on the safety aspect, I was assured by my science teacher travel buddy and the scientists there that it's perfectly fine to go for a day. As for the radiation, apparently even spending a weekend ...


10

It appears that the requirements to import a cat to the U.S. may not be too onerous. The guidelines I have found for importing cats to the United States seem to indicate that they must simply be healthy; it appears there may be surprisingly little paperwork involved. I just called the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)'s Animal and Plant Health ...


9

This is taken from the Wikipedia entry for Prypiat: The city of Chernobyl, a few kilometers south from Pripyat, has some accommodation including a hotel, many apartment buildings, and a local lodge, which are maintained as a permanent residence for watch-standing crew and tourists. Seems like at least there is a local effort to accomodate the few ...


9

Yes, you will have no problems flying in and out of these two countries so long as you do not stay over 3 months in either. They won't care where you've been previously. I've been in and out of both Ukraine and Lithuania multiple times, though never directly between the two. I go often between Ukraine and Poland and they never care where I was before. ...


9

A Dutch friend of mine just took this ferry in the Georgia→Ukraine direction so I asked him for some details: Company name: UkrFerry Ship name: Greifswald Quoted boarding time in Batumi: 10pm Actual departure time from Batumi: ~ 8am Quoted duration of trip: 60 hours Actual duration of trip: ~ 55 hours Price: USD $170 for a bed in a 2-bed cabin There were ...


8

I am Ukrainian, just took a weekend trip to Norway (flying from/to KBP) and there were no issues whatsoever at border in either direction. [update] Well, that escalated quickly... According to news due to tension with Russia border with them is "nearly locked down". According to reports: Russians coming are getting denied entry in droves Ukrainians ...


8

There is a lot of questions so let's start in order: You can book a tour online from Tour Kiev for example. They will all originate from Kiev since it's the closest major city. Yes. One of them is listed above and you can find plenty online. One thing I would suggest is not doing it at your own pace unless you know exactly how to operate within a high ...


8

I actually remember on Netflix watching an episode of a TV show where these adventists actually spent 48 hours in Chernobyl. Turns out the town is so isolated that the people and camera crew actually had to transfer from a passenger train in the Ukrane and finish the rest of the commute in a freight train car for 48 hours from the main transit hub. From ...


8

Here's an estimate: A 250km ride in a shared taxi or marshrutka costs the equivalent of 5 - 10 euros per person, with a petrol price of about 1 euro per liter, depending on how popular and difficult the route is. A marshrutka typically seats about 15 people, so a low estimate for renting a marshrutka for a 100km circular (that is, starting and finishing in ...


8

As usual, the definitive resource for this kind of information is the embassy of the country you want to visit in the country where you are a citizen of, in your case the embassy of Ukraine in Australia. Its visa requirement page, as is common, doesn't have all the information you want. You do need a visa to enter Ukraine, either a tourist visa or a transit ...


7

I think the question is fine, and very valid. As a New Zealander, when I went in 2008 it was required to get an invite from someone in the Ukraine - easy to get, just google for Ukraine invites. Once you have that, you need the visa, where you have to present your invite too, as well as an itinerary (that you're not held to). If you do get in, and can ...


6

Łukasz, first of all, I am pretty sure you can use your Polish Visa/Mastercard card in Ukraine and withdrawal issues would most likely be related to your bank which issued the card, and not the Ukrainian network of ATM and bank offices. Make sure to visit your local bank prior to going to Ukraine and make sure they unlock your card for operations abroad. ...


6

I would say that you don't have to negotiate a price - usually driver just tell the price and you accept it :) However, you may get a "bonus" as a foreigner, but I don't expect it to be more then 20-40%. Regarding sample price for 100 km. According to my latest experience (and google result), MastaBaba is more-or-less right - ~30 euros for bus for 10-15 ...


6

You can do such trip by "UkrFerry" company: From Kerch to Poti every Tuesday, at next day you are at Poti. Operations service phone: +38 (0482) 34-76-63. According to official forum, schedule is set at the start of each month, so you should call there before you came in Kerch. Also there is a line Batumi - Ilyichevsk, which is more popular line (ferry ...


5

I googled your question and found some websites (listed below), that contain general information regarding visa for the ukraine. You might find your answers there. On a dutch website, I also found an advice to ask ukraine travel questions on an expat forum specifically for the Ukraine http://www.travel-2-ukraine.com/visa-support/ ...


5

As I know, you definitely don't need the Russian visa if you are not going to leave the ship during stay in port. So you need to worry about it. Russian embassies can help you to obtain Russian visa due your unusual situation, so you can try it all the time - we are all the people, and you always can try to communicate with embassy. Also you should note ...


5

Also, I should note that it's not the data, it's the hardware cost I'm worried about (nothing spectacular, about $2000, but still) Are there any other ways to keep my laptop safe at home besides Kensington lock? To mitigate the hardware cost in case of theft, ensure that you're traveling with property insurance. Homeowner's or renter's insurance ...


4

There are actually great many options for getting to Tiraspol from Odessa including direct buses. You can see schedule (Russian) that lists 3 direct buses from Tiraspol to Odessa with the same schedule on the official Tiraspol's bus station site(Russian), with reciprocal schedule from Odessa and same again in Russian In addition there is a direct train ...


4

First of all: is it legal? Well, I have never heard about such problems too. Regarding Chornogora - yep, it is a kind of national park, there are even some official fees at some entrances, but all camping activities are pretty much allowed. The only places you may have legal problems at are country borders (like Marmarosy chain) - usually you have to ...


4

About 4 years ago I received a Ukrainian visa from the embassy in the Netherlands (I'm Australian). They even did it super fast as I didn't have much time. There is a train from Romania to Odessa that passes through Moldova. For $20 you can get a transit visa for Moldova (at the embassy in Bucharest) within an hour or so.


3

Honestly there isn't much to it. I went through the pain of getting an invitation from my aunt in Kiev, and when I applied at the Ukrainian embassy in London the guy there didn't even look at or take the invitation! You pretty much just front up (allow plenty of time), pay, hand over your passport and some photos, wait 14 days...return, collect your ...


2

I do not think that you will have problems with visiting Russia after the Ukraine, but I would not be sure about the other way round. Concerning sanctions: I personally never heard that EU countries did not allow to enter a country, one German told even about his experience to visit Serbia (!) during the Yugoslav Wars. Naturally the government will warn you ...


2

On the ukferry.com website, it states that "Service is temporarily suspended with effect" for this route. A email to their Customer Service Line (ukf@ukrferry.com) also left me with a doubt ("We have no status currently of the opening of that route"), that it will be opened anytime soon. There are plenty of options if you could leave from Ilyichevsk, ...


2

If you are really only worried about the hardware cost, possibly the safest approach would be to insure your laptop, if you can find an affordable policy. In my case I there was an option to add it to my home insurance. Then the insurance will have a lot of annoying small print about what is excluded, which you need to read. Usually items left in a hotel are ...


1

You could rig up a cheap wireless security camera and place it somewhere that the the would-be burglar will see it, like right next to your laptop. Maybe even add a sign that says, "Jesus is watching you." Something like this camera might do nicely. I don't know how much space you have in your bags, but if you could stand traveling with it, this would be a ...



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