New answers tagged

2

There shouldn't be a problem with you entering the UK on your UK passport. The issue would only arise if you tried to enter on the (now technically invalid) visa. If you think there might be a problem, go through the manual checkpoint upon arrival in the UK and ask the UKBF official to cancel the visa. If they can't do it there and then, they can probably ...


17

According to Gov UK, a person born in the UK to "settled" parents will be a British Citizen. If you were born on or after 1 January 1983, you’ll be a British citizen if your mother or father was either: a British citizen when you were born ‘settled’ in the UK when you were born You can also use a quick quiz on the site to determine if you ...


2

Does the visa application form ask you about driving bans? Obviously, you should be truthful on the application, but there's no reason to volunteer information if you're not asked for it. For example, looking at http://www.rusembassy.ca/sites/default/files/AppFormVisa_USA.pdf (the forms are slightly different when applying from different countries I ...


0

It is highly unlikely that a conviction for drunk driving would influence your visa application, provided you are upfront about it. They are far more likely to be concerned about ensuring you are only going there to visit and will leave within the expiry of the visa and how you will finance yourself while there.


0

All degrees of theft carry some form of jail sentence and a fine; these range from 60 days and $500 all the way to 30 years and $10,000 - it depends entirely on what you are charged with; which correlates directly with the value of the item. So, the very first thing you have to do is find out what exactly is the charge against you; in other words - what ...


3

Your best advice in this situation is to speak to a local lawyer in Florida. The lawyer will be able to inform you of the risks of visiting the state, as well as the options of settling the misdemeanor charge currently set against you. If it's truly a minor misdemeanor, you might be able to send a written affidavit to Florida and have the lawyer argue the ...


6

In addition to the issue of the potential arrest warrant, which has been extensively covered in other answers, there is another issue to consider. The UK is part of the US's Visa Waiver Program. This allows visa-free travel and requires you to complete an online form and declaration, and pay a small fee. It is the usual way for a UK citizen to travel to the ...


8

I am just going to answer the specific question "will they know it's me now that I've got a new passport". That question has got somewhat buried in discussion of the probability of negative consequences if they do know, and ways of mitigating those consequences. The USCIS has the information you supplied on your last visit. You will presumably complete an ...


4

I am surprised that no one mentioned the fact that you could be in contempt of court and that an arrest warrant could be a sealed arrest warrant (that is, you won't discover there is an outstanding warrant against you until it's too late). An arrest warrant is usually NOT published or posted online. It is kept secret so that the police can arrest you with ...


23

While I agree with all the advice that it's both foolish to risk incarceration in a foreign country for the sake a family vacation (in quite an over-rated spot, at that) and that showing up in court in response to a summons is not considered an optional activity, you can check fairly easily on whether or not you have any active warrants in Florida. The ...


36

Although it doesn't entirley answer your question, I am posting this as answer because I don't think you appreciate the risks involved here. Your proposition is to travel to a foreign country and risk imprisonment there, for the sake of a family holiday. Your hope for avoiding these consequences is that they will not recognise you based off the fact that ...



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