Hot answers tagged

37

Although it doesn't entirley answer your question, I am posting this as answer because I don't think you appreciate the risks involved here. Your proposition is to travel to a foreign country and risk imprisonment there, for the sake of a family holiday. Your hope for avoiding these consequences is that they will not recognise you based off the fact that ...


24

Since you are a citizen of the European Union you do not need a visa to travel to any other EU country. UK is not part of the Schengen Area, so you only need a passport (or national identity card) to cross the border and that's it. From Wikipedia: Individuals from the following countries can enter the Schengen Area, Bulgaria,[3] Cyprus,[4] and Romania[5] ...


23

While I agree with all the advice that it's both foolish to risk incarceration in a foreign country for the sake a family vacation (in quite an over-rated spot, at that) and that showing up in court in response to a summons is not considered an optional activity, you can check fairly easily on whether or not you have any active warrants in Florida. The ...


21

This is actually very clearly covered by this document published by the Department of State, which is linked from the page on the Visa Waiver Program: Conference, meeting, trade show, or business event attendee: Will receive no salary or income from a U.S based company/entity. For scientific, educational, professional or business purposes. Lecturer or ...


20

Firstly keep in mind that the answer to this question will vary significantly depending on the countries involved. Some countries (eg, the US) have requirements that if you are a citizen you MUST enter using the passport of that country. So as a US/UK citizen you must always use your US passport when entering the US. The UK does NOT have such a ...


20

If you paid by credit card, dispute the invalid charge immediately with your credit card company/bank and let them handle it. You'll get the money back quickly, and it becomes their problem from then on. If you did not pay by credit card, things get more difficult. If you're still in Thailand, contact the Tourist Police, who should be able to help you ...


19

The general consensus on the internet seems to be that the sticker is an RFID chip used by Identity and Passport Service (IPS) to track the production process of the passport from start to shipping. There are many such questions disseminated across the web (here, here and here are a few examples). Most mention stories of people traveling with and without the ...


17

Good news. As a British citizen, assuming you're visiting for under 90 days, you don't need a visa. You can apply through the Visa Waiver Program under the ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization). From the US Embassy in London: British citizens: please note that from 12 January 2009 all nationals and citizens of Visa Waiver Program (VWP) ...


17

HMPO have now included a little note along with the passport that says "the label on the back of your passport was used during the production process and can now be removed".


17

According to Gov UK, a person born in the UK to "settled" parents will be a British Citizen. If you were born on or after 1 January 1983, you’ll be a British citizen if your mother or father was either: a British citizen when you were born ‘settled’ in the UK when you were born You can also use a quick quiz on the site to determine if you ...


16

I don't know exactly what the situation is with businesses in Stockholm, but in Gothenburg (the 2nd largest city), nearly every place will take both card and cash. Some places, generally high-end restaurants, will only take card as payment, and in festivals, street markets and student pubs it could happen that they only accept cash.


14

I am a British subject with the right of abode. I had a British passport for a long time but stopped renewing it. I am also a Canadian citizen with a Canadian passport. When I enter Britain, about half the time the customs officer asks me if I am British (coming to a country to visit your sister, for example, will get you asked that) and when I say "well, I ...


14

The Visa-Waiver Program, or VWP (which is what the ESTA relates to) allows you to enter the US for the purposes of Tourism or Business, but not for 'work'. The distinction here is really down to where you are paid. Presuming you are already working for this company, and being paid in the UK, then your visit to their US offices is classified as a "business" ...


14

Yes. You can leave the airport. As a British citizen you do not need a visa to visit Iceland. Just be back in time to get through security before your flight leaves. You'll need to be back at the airport at least one hour before departure. Update: When I originally wrote this answer, an hour was plenty of time for a passenger who already had a boarding pass ...


14

Your question is explicitly addressed by the rules. Paragraph 12 of the UK Immigration Rules states... A person claiming to be a British citizen must prove that he has the right of abode in the United Kingdom by producing either: (i) a United Kingdom passport describing him as a British citizen or as a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies ...


13

Yes, you can - the pending H1-B application does not impact your ability to use the VWP program at all. As with anyone using VWP you will need to obtain an ESTA in advance of your trip. The only real complication is that you can not change from VWP to H1-B status whilst in the US. ie, if/when your H1-B is approved, you will need to leave the US to obtain ...


13

Some countries apply restrictions on tourists (e.g. still having 3 to 6 months validity left on the passport) but I would expect that just about any country in the world would accept a valid passport from their own citizens, even if it expires the day after. Many countries, including the UK, even officially accept expired passports in this situation.


12

I assure you, as a UK Citizen you're a member of the EU, and can travel anywhere in that area without restriction. Travelling to France is Easy - you can fly, train, or take the ferry, and as long as you have your passport with you, or national ID card, you'll be absolutely fine. Schengen is for people from other countries who may need a vetting process ...


11

First, I can really recommend to read through www.waytorussia.net. This seems a very good online resource that could answer all my questions when I planned my trip through Russia last spring. Therefore, I can recommend the service a third-party company provides over this website. You have to pay 20 US dollars and they book a hotel for you, send you the ...


11

If you hold more than one passport, you're supposed to only be consistent with what you do in a country. So enter on one, leave on the other is a no-no, but you're fully entitled - as a US Citizen, to visit the UK. I did the same when visiting South Africa - my friends were in the 'tourist' queue, and I had both passports with me, but went through the ...


11

It's worth noting that if you're just driving, then you need either both forms of your UK driver's license if pulled over, OR the paper form + passport. One point worth noting is that they're REALLY strict on PASSPORT ID for bars and clubs. I've tried and failed several times to use a UK driver's license, and spoken with many travellers with the same ...


11

Yes it is valid in the UK, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency in the UK: If you’ve got a full and valid licence you can drive any small vehicle (eg car or motorcycle) listed on your licence for 12 months from when you last entered Great Britain (GB).


11

You may not need your passport photo countersigning. If you can still be recognised between your old photos and your new ones, and you still have the passport, then you don't need to get your photos countersigned -From the official online passport application page: Everyone must send two new photos, but if you've changed a lot and can't be recognised ...


9

If you hold a UK passport, then you hold a EU passport. You can legally live, work, travel and holiday in any other EU country for as long as you like, without requiring a visa. The UK (along with Ireland and some others) are not in Schengen (some countries are in Schengen but not the EU (like Norway)). Schengen is only to make things much easier at borders....


9

If you have a British Citizen passport you can enter South Korea as a tourist for up to 90 days without a visa. Sources: Korean ministry of Foreign Affairs GOV.UK Wikipedia


9

No. Firstly, note that you'll likely be required to get a visa at the border with the US, even though you're in the visa-waiver countries for ESTA - it apparently only counts for flights, or within 90 days of a flight into the US if arriving by land(!) as I found out, twice. However, leaving the country there's not even a passport check - you simply need ...


9

It's a valid question (assuming your interest is genuine). South African nationals were non-visa nationals up to 2012, meaning they could arrive and seek leave to enter just like Australians, Canadians, and so on. But starting in about 2006, the Home Office determined that there were grave performance issues and asked Parliament to add South Africa to the ...


9

Australia has Reciprocal Health Care Agreements with: New Zealand United Kingdom Republic of Ireland Sweden Netherlands Finland Italy Belgium Malta Slovenia Norway These agreements mean: Australian residents can get help with the cost of essential medical treatment when visiting these countries Full information about Reciprocal Health Care ...


9

Don't worry! Loads of people fly the same route every day, and there are people who can help you at JFK if need be. Before you travel you should apply via "ESTA" which is like a visa. If your travel dates are fixed, you should apply now, here: https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/ When you fly from the UK to the US: During flight, you will probably be handed a ...



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