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12

This page has more details on your situation as a non-EU family member of an EU national: http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=463&langId=en Most importantly it clarifies that you'll have the right to live, work and get educated in the country your mother lives and works in, not the entire EU. And it will probably require copious amounts of ...


10

Your best bet is to sign up to a crew-finding website like findacrew.net. A friend who cycled from London to New Zealand did this for the ocean parts - hung out in port and used the site. What was observed is that there are different levels of opportunities. Some berths require that you have licenses or sailing experience, or a particular skill (eg ...


7

Since the airport's renovation in 2009, both national and internations flights are handled in the same terminal building, which is not particularly large (about 150x250m). So you won't waste much time walking, and unless there are huge queues or your arrival is delayed, a 1:15 layover time should be sufficient (but not generous) even if you have to pick up ...


7

The village you are looking for is called Çukurayva, while Keçror is an old Armenian name for the village Tunçkaya.


7

No. Currently (June 2014), there is no rail link between Turkey and Georgia. A railway link from Turkey to Georgia is under construction: see Kars-Tblisi-Baku railway on Wikipedia. The railway link between Georgia and Russia is currently closed due to the political conflict in Abkhazia. See Georgian Railways, again on Wikipedia. You might be able to ...


6

US Citizens do indeed require a visa to visit Turkey, whilst Swedish citizens do not (for a stay of up to 90 days). Unlike some countries, Turkey visas are little more than a fee payment - at least when purchased on arrival. In purchasing multiple of them I've never had them even look at my passport beyond opening it to a blank page and sticking in the ...


5

If you are under 21 or have a proof that your are dependent on your mother, you can work or live in an EU country where your mother lives. But if you keep living in a non-EU country, you will still need a visa to travel to an EU country, since you are Turkish citizen.


5

Even though I still believe that using WiFi at the airport might be a better solution for your data needs you can a MiFi device from places like: Global WiFi Rental, which is available for pick up and return at the airport. And similar discussion on TripAdvisor. There is also Cell Hire in UK that also offers the MiFi Rental service.


5

The visas used to be 15€ or 20$, and paying in Turkish liras was not an option. There was an ATM right next to the visa booth. However, as of the 10th of April this year, visas are now applied- and paid for online at https://www.evisa.gov.tr/en/. EU citizens can get the visa at electronic booths in the airport, but getting it online prior to arrival is ...


5

Yes you need a visa to enter Turkey, according to Turkish Ministry Of Foreign Affairs United States of America: Ordinary and official passport holders are required to have visa to enter Turkey. They can obtain three month-multiple entry visas from Turkish diplomatic representations abroad and also via the website www.evisa.gov.tr. Please note, no more ...


5

As far as I understand as @Annoyed said Bulgaria and Turkey are not part of Schengen area right now. Even though you enter those countries, it's considered as you exit Schengen area and if you only have single-entry Schengen visa you might have a problem entering Schengen area again. I used to do this when I entered Croatia which they also accept any holders ...


5

Needing a visa and needing a passport are two different things. Generally speaking, you need a passport when going abroad. Many countries do treat transit differently when it comes to visa requirements but there is certainly no general exception to the passport requirement. That said, Turkey accepts ID cards (even for entry) for a handful of nationalities ...


5

Indeed it appears online that the Lesovo border is for commercial trucks only, and I can see where you get that view. This blog, for example, notes that the road they are on to the crossing at Malko Tarnavo is almost devoid of traffic, as all the trucks go through the Lesovo border. The Lesovo border was the focus on the news recently when it looked like ...


5

Georgia is not part of the Schengen area, however it does have special rules for valid Schengen visa holders. According to the Georgian ministry of foreign affairs: Foreign nationals who have a multiple entry US, EU or Schengen member states visas, which have validity for one year or more and had been used once at least, can enter or stay on the ...


4

I found Çukurayva with Google search which gave me a map: This looks the same as the aerial view on the article. But nothing around has a name looking like Kechror.


4

The key point is that it's exceedingly unlikely for all of Turkey to get slapped with an "avoid all travel" advisory, but I'll answer anyway for posterity. One by one: Airlines can choose where they fly irrespective of travel advisories, and there are commercial flights to places like Baghdad and Mogadishu that no sane voluntary traveller goes to. So, ...


4

For Turkey, Iraq and Syria borders are places for possible safety issues, But for Touristic vacations, you probably never go the border. For south eastern towns are rarely have problems about terrorist activities but since the clashes with the army is always on the high mountains you probably will not have any problem about visiting touristic places like ...


4

The Australian government has a great Travel Advisory site, with information on each page. Generally they're slightly over-protective, but that's arguably a good thing. Their current status for Turkey is to exercise a high degree of caution, but they're not at the stage where you need to reconsider your need to travel yet, unless you're crossing or near the ...


4

overland, you can cross from Turkey to Georgia at the Sarp border crossing. From Georgia you can cross to Russia at the Kazbegi - Verkhni Lars border crossing. I did both border crossing last year, no problems if you have the necessary visas. Sarp border crossing is very modern, quick and easy. in about 20 minutes you're on the other side. Regarding ...


4

You've got three sensible options: taxi, bus, or train. Taxis are taxis, and they're generally fine, although I've heard the occasional horror story; get a regular cab from the rank and use the meter, the fare should be 35-40 TL. Non-stop airport express buses are operated by Havataş, charging a flat fare of 10 TL. They serve a variety of places in the ...


4

Yes, you can go to Istanbul with your ID card. Generally speaking, Kris is right, you do need a valid passport, even for countries for which you don't need a visa. But in this case, you can in fact enter Turkey with your national ID (see this official page from the Turkish ministry of Foreign Affairs and the relevant page from the Italian ministry of ...


3

Details are complex and partly off-topic for this site but understanding the logic behind EU law might help. Basically, you don't have any direct rights, only your mother does. That said, a person's right of free movement in the EU also entails e.g. traveling or moving to another EU country with their non-EU spouse or dependents. But the idea is that ...


3

Visa requirements will depend on your citizenship. You can find the specifics on the website of the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. If your passport allows you to enter Turkey visa free or get a visa-on-arrival anyway, the Schengen visa won't make a difference. However, if you would normally need a regular visa and hoped to get a Turkish e-visa/sticker ...


3

Simple answer, Yes you can. Just make sure you get back to the airport before the flight. If your flight is in one ticket, then you do not even need to pick up luggage and re-check it in (thanks to @jpatokal for the reminder). Just go out, enjoy your time :)


3

Tor-Einar Jarnbjo is right. The official description is: 1.2 km west of the village of Chukurayva, 5 kms south-east of the fortified town of Kechror, Gabeghiank District, Ayrarat Province, Armenia Maior (Kaghzvan District, Kars Region until 1920, at present Kars İli Kağızman İlçesi Kötek Bucağı), at an altitude of 1,949 meters above sea level ...


3

As far as I know, due to the major infrastructure work (for high speed trains) train schedules from Istanbul to the rest of Turkey are cancelled. I am not completely sure, so be advised. If I were you, I'd take a bus from the city center, as the tickets are very cheap and, relative to trains, buses are more comfortable and faster. You can have a look at ...


3

Turkey is about to end their visa-on-arrival program and is already offering an online eVisa application system. Even if visa-on-arrival is still available at designated airports, I am pretty sure that crossing a land border requires you to obtain a visa in advance. The online application process is very simple, you fill out some personal details and your ...



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