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16

I'm in Istanbul right now, and when I got here I asked a friend who has been here before. According to her, no, it's not required, but is always welcome. I have not got any noticeable negative reactions over the past week from not tipping, and very gracious thanks when I have done so, but I'm still new to the country and may have trouble 'reading' people ...


13

I asked my Turkish friends and here's what they had to say: although major cities do have water filtration plants and water is considered drinkable at the source, the quality of water pipes that supply it within a building or in specific localities might be suspect. You are, thus, better off not drinking tap water straight unless you're using it after ...


13

No problems at all. The two countries are friends especially due to the pipeline bringing oil from Azerbaijan to Turkey via Georgia. Nationals of either country can visit the other without visas. Border crossings There are two active border crossings and I believe one inactive one. The main one is on the Black Sea coast and is very busy and has been ...


12

You can pay in EUR or USD (cash-only), the price schedule is posted in both currencies (link).


12

No, you don't need a transit visa - as long as you don't leave the transit lounge. But be sure about your change with airlines/planes, as there are two airports in Istanbul. You may read detailed information on the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.


12

This page has more details on your situation as a non-EU family member of an EU national: http://ec.europa.eu/social/main.jsp?catId=463&langId=en Most importantly it clarifies that you'll have the right to live, work and get educated in the country your mother lives and works in, not the entire EU. And it will probably require copious amounts of ...


11

I have seen these toilets in Indonesia a lot (in hotels, Malls...etc). This type of toilet comes in different styles. Some have a very forceful tap that can literally make a second hole in your butt or make the one you have wider! These types do not need any hands to help with the cleaning as the forceful stream will clean everything. Some will be as you ...


11

As a general rule, I would advise against renting a car for the entire trip. Renting a car in Turkey is expensive. The bus network in Turkey is very dense. Bus travel is comfortable and not expensive. Prefer the busses for long distance travel. You may consider to rent a car locally to access some sights. For very long distances, flying may be an option too. ...


11

Your best bet is to sign up to a crew-finding website like findacrew.net. A friend who cycled from London to New Zealand did this for the ocean parts - hung out in port and used the site. What was observed is that there are different levels of opportunities. Some berths require that you have licenses or sailing experience, or a particular skill (eg ...


10

I live in Izmir and have travelled in Istanbul many times. Tap water all over Turkey including big cities is a hit-or-miss affair. It's not guaranteed to kill you, but it doesn't generally taste that good and drinking it is considered a bad idea just in case. Most cities try to treat it enough to make it non-dangerous, but that doesn't make it good water. ...


10

There was an earthquake in Van last month and there has been many smaller ones since then. Many buildings have collapsed and there are problems in the electricity network. So I definitely don't advise you to visit Van any time soon. However, it is a nice city with history and nature. I do not know where exactly you mean by Kurdistan, but I suggest Adıyaman ...


10

I've stayed in a lot of homestays around the world, and in my experience the best thing to give is something local (to you) and edible. Being a Brit, this usually results in local hand-made fudge. Usually people who provide homestays will receive a good many guests so trinkets are not so good - they just accumulate as clutter. Confectionary is a safe bet, ...


10

You should consult your country's travel advisories. All countries maintain such advisories, usually the state department is responsible for them. For example here is Canada's advisory on Turkey. Currently they are not advising against travel, just urging people to be cautious. Similarly the US advisory does not advice against travel but does admonish ...


9

Web site of Istanbul city buses is IETT (in turkish). To the left, there is a form labelled "Hat Arama". Typing 83O in this form, then clicking on "Saat" button below gives timetable for this line. Copy/paste the (long) URL to Google translation gives first departure from Taksim at 6:50 AM.


9

US Citizens DO require a visa to enter Turkey. Presuming you are only visiting for tourism (which it sounds like you are), you can obtain the Visa (the "sticker" you refer to) at your point of entry. After you enter the airport but before immigration there is a window where you simply hand over the visa fee and they will put the Visa into your passport. ...


9

With the exception of some hotels, some high-end (tourist-focused) retail, and many shops are the airport, the only currency used is Turkish Lira. Anywhere that does accept other currencies will do it at a relatively poor exchange rate, so even where it's possible, I wouldn't recommend it. However Money Changers are pretty much omnipresent in Istanbul - at ...


8

You may consider going to Chios and then to Cesme. Here is more information: There are many different options from Piraeus to Chios. Prices start from 22.50€. From Chios to Cesme, I have found one line for 25€. This site has the information related to pricing and time tables. You need to select your departure and arrival points from the menus.


8

There is a ferry between Piraeus and Samos at about 50€, then another ferry between Samos and Kuşadası at about 35€.


8

It's very simple to use. When you are done, use some paper to wipe the remainings just like you usually do. Then use the tap to wash it WITHOUT using your hand in there. (use some paper to operate tap) Then wipe with paper again until it's clean and dry. That way, it will be more hygienic. Paper + water is better than just paper or just water. Don't ...


8

"keep the change" will work in many situations, or simply leaving the change on the table. There is no percentage expectation whatsoever. In Turkish culture, tipping is more of a nice gesture than social obligation. As mentioned in other answers, it will always create a nice reaction from the serving staff or owner (if it's a small place), and they may even ...


8

Demonstrations take place at Taksim square, which is a very small part of the numerous sightseeing of Istanbul. The historic center should be safe. Moreover, if you plan to visit other places, you should see no demonstration at all, except in very localized spots in Ankara.


8

The general answer is yes. It is safe to travel there. Nevertheless, Turkey being a very big country one cannot lump everything together. The more detailed answer to this questions largely depends on where you go.  The area around the Syrian border should be avoided. But that's nothing really new. Some areas in the East and the South-East should be ...


7

The visas used to be 15€ or 20$, and paying in Turkish liras was not an option. There was an ATM right next to the visa booth. However, as of the 10th of April this year, visas are now applied- and paid for online at https://www.evisa.gov.tr/en/. EU citizens can get the visa at electronic booths in the airport, but getting it online prior to arrival is ...


7

I crossed the border from Turkey to Georgia about midnight last night. There were no obvious exchange booths like at many borders but I didn't go into the duty free store. I'm now in Tbilisi and most exchange places I've seen (of which there are many) only display rates for USD, EUR, and RUB. UPDATE I've now been in Georgia almost seven months and can ...


7

I found a newspaper article about Istanbul countryside. This is: Ditching the guidebook to explore the green and pleasant lands around Istanbul. Excerpts: ... Just two hours away from the former capital of the Roman Empire, serene Lake Sapanca's welcoming 40km shoreline tempts picnicing travellers and boutique spa hotels make for a beautiful ...


7

Here's the official announcement from the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Avustralya vatandaşlarına sınırda vize ücreti. There's no reason given for the increase. In the warnings for Turkish citizens travelling to foreign countries, I don't see anything about visa rates for Australia having gone up, whereas there are announcements about changes for ...


7

I think this rule of >6 months depends on the visited country, your citizenship and the type of visa. There is a TripAdivsor forum saying you need to have your passport valid for 90 days after your visa expiry date. This means you most likely need to have your passport valid for >6 months in the case of Turkey (If you just travel). You can find ...


7

Being a Turk and living in İzmir, yes nearly all beaches in Turkey are bikini friendly. In fact, Antalya attracts millions of foreign tourists every year, mostly Russians. You will have no problems about using any kind of swim suits. You can even find topless suntan girls (generally foreigners). For recommendations, Antalya is a better choice for it has ...



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