New answers tagged

-1

I'm wondering why you just don't drive to your nearest MVS office and get a replacement on the spot. Also, why are you even asking here. Call your airline for info directly related to your specific situation. I lost my license while on vacation and didn't realize it until I was ready to go through airport security. (I had already printed my boarding pass at ...


4

Harry Vervet's answer is correct, as someone that flies quite a bit, I can tell you 100% your don't need a state issued ID to fly. What you should do is allow your self more time to get through the process. 9/10 times they just send you through the perv scanner and ask a few extra questions. Some airports are setup in a way that the boarding pass check and ...


4

Why not just go to the local Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent in your state) office and get a replacement. They are aware that these things happen and have forms for just this case. I recently misplaced my license and followed this course. I waited in line for 10 minutes and the process took about 5. I think there may have been a small ...


28

Call the airline to see if they have any suggestions. TSA does not require you to have ID: In the event you arrive at the airport without valid identification, because it is lost or at home, you may still be allowed to fly. The TSA officer may ask you to complete a form to include your name and current address, and may ask additional questions to ...


8

There are many other ways to provide ID to security, depending on how many of those were also stolen with your wallet, you have quite a few options. According to the TSA's website, you can use any of the following (besides your driver's license and passport): U.S. passport card DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST) U.S. ...


1

There's not a very reliable answer to this question. If TSA has statistics for "how likely is it that my bag will be hand searched?", or "what is the best way to avoid a security check of my bag?", I suspect it does not disclose them. If you want a guarantee that your packaged goods will be undisturbed, this kind of public air carriage is not the solution. ...


1

A metal PC case is going to be almost transparent to an airport x-ray machine. In the era when you didn't have to to take your laptop out, I often travelled with two or three in my hand-luggage and only rarely got asked to remove them to be separately screened. The only problem is likely to be the PSU. If you can remove that and pack it separately or take ...


1

There is a very strong possibility that the combination of the large metal case and the outer container being securely taped shut will generate interest from the TSA inspector. You would do well to pack it in a fashion that allows it to be easily opened and closed (ie: no tape). I travel occasionally with large plastic totes and use nylon compression straps ...


55

Not a solution for the current problem, but for future reference it may be good to keep in mind: As others have pointed out, TSA-compliant locks are a joke and a waste of money. They are not secure and do not serve the purpose (any more) that you would traditionally expect from a lock. Too many non-TSA people can also open them (besides possible criminal ...


49

Get your own key for the TSA lock. Unfortunately for the traveling public in the US, these locks are notoriously insecure. Keys for them can be had for $10 or less on eBay. (example)



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