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3

No, the rules are not different. Currently the rules for liquids are exactly the same in US and EU. The rules are: Containers up to 100mL (3.4oz) In clear bag up to 1L (1 quart) One bag per passenger Also in both in US and EU exceptions apply, but they are especially the same: US – „Medically required liquids, such as medications, creams and breast ...


9

Just so we are clear. Security at airport(s) in Brussels is not the responsibility of the US TSA even if flight is coming from or going to the US. If you're interested you can go to the Brussels Airport Site on Bags & Security for more details on what is and is not allowed on board which among other restrictions states: Medicines and dietary ...


5

Some unusual items from the official list: Ivory not certified to be over 100 years old is prohibited Items originating from Cuba are prohibited, even if purchased elsewhere Any items made of dog or cat fur are prohibited Absinthe has some unusual restrictions: The absinthe content must be "thujone free" (that is, it must contain less than 10 parts ...


2

Some quick Googling for other's experience (as I have been fortunate enough to never have anything but a screwdriver confiscated while travelling in/out of the USA) turns up mostly things that are either agriculture related (any sort of dead animal or a dead animal product) or controlled substances (even "ordinary" things that are not prescription but may be ...


5

Haggis is prohibited. Traditionally haggis is made with sheep lungs, which have been banned from food in the USA since 1971. There have recently been calls to end this ban, see a report from The Guardian - Scotland to petition US to bring back haggis. Though I don't think the law has changed yet. Even though sheep lungs are a traditional ingredient, not ...


17

The full list of items restricted from being brought into the United States, is maintained by the US Customs and Border Protection agency, and can be found here. Aside from the usual agricultural and weapons restrictions, be aware of the complete ban on the importation of Cuban made items, and the peculiar regulations regarding Absinthe. Also, be advised ...


3

Since rules change over time from country to country, and we're unlikely to go through every item comparing it to every country, the best solution is to go to the source - the TSA. Their list of Prohibited Items is updated regularly and is extensive and thorough. There are some perhaps unexpected items, but often with good reason - certain chemicals, for ...


4

The most important thing to remember about these new regulations is that they only apply at "certain overseas airports". In general, the TSA has no authority at overseas airports, and all airport security is carried out by the equivalent security group in the country the airport resides in. However at some international airports, direct flights to the US ...


3

Here is a link to the official announcement from the TSA: http://www.tsa.gov/press/releases/2014/07/06/enhanced-security-measures-certain-airports-overseas The text contains the following statement: "During the security examination, officers may also ask that owners power up some devices, including cell phones. Powerless devices will not be permitted ...


3

Since it's a prescription ointment, it's not subject to the 100 ml / 3.4 fluid ounces rules anyway. Have the prescription label on it and clearly readable, and make sure the name matches the name on your boarding pass and in your passport, and you're fine. (This is more than you technically need because the rules just say "medications" but why give a ...


2

I don't know if the TSA also has weight or mass limits but the 3.4-fluid-ounce rule is a volume limit (more-or-less equivalent to 100 ml). In any case, it would seem that the container needs to be smaller than that, by volume. A mass in grams or even in ounces does not directly indicate that.



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