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18

The only possible difference is that in the EU, they may not have the TSA keys. Therefore it just becomes like a normal lock that you have the keys for and they don't. So worst case, they may flag the bag for inspection and require you to open it for them. Indeed in Europe you're still allowed to lock it with whatever lock you want, so it's perfectly ...


13

When you're making rules like this, simplicity and objectivity are vital. You don't want (whether you're a traveller, a supervisor of the security staff, or a person trying to prevent terrorism) a situation where security staff need to make decisions on their feet based on whether the passenger's story is good enough or any other kind of judgement call. Hmm, ...


13

Simple: Label them as saline solution. We took our shoes off and placed our laptops in bins. Schneier took from his bag a 12-ounce container labeled "saline solution." "It's allowed," he said. Medical supplies, such as saline solution for contact-lens cleaning, don't fall under the TSA's three-ounce rule. "What's allowed?" I asked. "Saline ...


11

For the most part, the 3.4oz rule isn't strictly enforced, in the sense that they don't normally physically check ever single container you have to make sure that it's less than 3.4oz. If it's significantly larger than 3.4oz they will normally be able to see that on the X-ray, and will physically inspect it. As an example, I travel with a can of spray ...


11

I believe "standard" tubes of toothpaste are about 6 ounces or more. This would not be allowed within the US as TSA regulations limit liquids and gels to containers of at most 3.4 oz (100 ml). Larger containers which are partially empty are specifically forbidden. See http://www.tsa.gov/311/311-carry-ons.shtm.


11

So I am reading a blog on a TSA site, which describes though not in great detail the standard operating procedure for the inspection of the bags including an automated system that triggers the bag inspection. So if the inspection is warranted a human being will pull your bag and do a manual inspection and finds the notice inside the bag. Now here is where ...


11

The TSA was created by the act of Congress, which also empowers it to make and enforce regulations, and gives the executive branch the authority to press charges. In addition there are also FAA regulations which are also authorized by the Congress. Acting against the TSA/FAA regulations is acting against regulations placed by an agency authorized by the ...


10

As you're going from Terminal 5 to Terminal 1 you will need to re-clear security, and your duty free liquids will not be allowed through regardless of how they are packaged. Normally the solution to this would be to put the duty free in your checked luggage after clearing customs, but given that you're on a "pre-cleared" flight you are correct in that your ...


10

It probably depends on how your cheese grater is constructed. You can see the official list of prohibited items on the TSA web site. The most relevant section seems to be the "sharp objects" section, which lists: Box Cutters Ice Axes/Ice Picks Knives - except for plastic or round bladed butter knives Meat Cleavers Razor-Type blades - such as ...


10

Yes, you will have problems passing through airport security - however you WILL almost certainly be allowed through. The TSA page on acceptable IDs states : We understand passengers occasionally arrive at the airport without an ID, due to lost items or inadvertently leaving them at home. Not having an ID does not necessarily mean a passenger won't ...


9

There are no rules, either TSA, FAA, airline or otherwise, that would stop you from taking a wireless mouse (or most any other "transmitting" device) through security and onto a plane. However once you're on the plane there are rules specific to radio transmitting devices, which a wireless mouse is. With very few exceptions, the rules are broken into two ...


8

Yes and No. There are a few different ways to get TSA Pre - each with it's own restrictions. You can get access via your airline, particularly if you're a frequent flyer. Historically you had to specifically request to gain access via this means, however many airline now will automatically submit you for access. Check with your airline to see if there's a ...


7

At the end of the day, the question boils down to "Can you be arrested or fined for trying to bring banned items on board?", and the short answer to that is "No", unless you're trying to bring in weaponry or getting uppity when busted. Straight from the horse's mouth: TSA recognizes that most passengers who carry prohibited items do so without any ill ...


7

Redress Control Number is used to help travelers who have been denied or delayed airline boarding; have been denied or delayed entry into or exit from the U.S. at a port of entry or border crossing; or have been repeatedly referred to additional (secondary) screening. Airlines will modify their reservation systems to accept the 7 digits redress number to ...


7

The best way for TSA agents (or any other airport security in the world) not confiscating liquids larger than 3 ounces is to not carry them. You can replace toothpaste by tooth powder. You can replace shampoo by Aleppo soap. You can replace shave cream by shave soap (or Aleppo soap if you don't mind travelling light with one multiusage item). You can ...


7

According to the TSA's "Can I Bring..." web site (also available on their Mobile App) you CAN bring your Cheese Grater in either Carry-on or checked-in luggage. Search Results For: cheese grater Check or Carry-on You may transport this item in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage. For items you wish to carry-on, you should check with the ...


6

In my experience, airports in the EU are a bit less strict with locks. I have seen several items of baggage that have normal little padlocks on them, not these fancy "approved" locks.


6

According to Google image search, this is what it's supposed to look like:


6

The only requirement is that the boarding pass must be "same day", so there is no real limit as to when you will be allowed through security as long as it's the same day as the departure. The only exception to this would be a flight leaving shortly after midnight in which case you will be allowed through security the day before, although in this case it's ...


5

You will probably need to file a FOIA request to get that information. Some chemicals can cause reactions and have not been tested for cancer. TSA probably uses a product called "Elite EL200" marketed by "Scanna MSC" to test drinks.


5

In addition to the other answers and regarding the safety of the frozen milk, you need to keep it frozen so it won't get spoiled, ask the airlines if they can provide some "dry ice" packs for you. It is not allowed to bring it yourself as it is considered to be a "dangerous goods" item, but the airlines can authorize it to be onboard (it is actually avaiable ...


5

It's actually perfectly common and relatively normal to transport breast milk on a plane. So common, in fact, that the TSA has their own page on how to do it. The key points: Parents flying with, and without, their child(ren) are permitted to bring breast milk in quantities greater than three ounces as long as it is presented for inspection at the ...


5

You can bring back as many as you want, however, you will only get the first liter free from duties. "The other will be dutiable at 3 percent, plus any Internal Revenue Service tax." Source: U.S. Customs and Border Protection.


5

According to the TSA, the limit is such that it would be impossible to use liquid/plastic explosives to take the plane down, while still allowing us to have our minimal amount of soap and shampoo for these 2-day business trips without having to check in any luggage. Here's more from the TSA.


5

There are blogs on the subject of what actually happens with the confiscated items: The Week TSA and there are a few others. Basically TSA confiscated items that can be resold are being resold through the Surplus program run by the state where the airport is located. So for example in Pennsylvania Department of General Services Surplus Operations ...


4

They usually tell you to throw them away. I had to throw away a brand new tube of toothpaste that I have mistakenly left in my bag. But they do miss occasionally, or rather "look the other way", and it happened to me as well a couple of times. I wouldn't count on it. I believe its more of a common-sense-bend-the-rules discretion of an individual officer, ...


4

For short-term travel, I often bring small reusable nondescript containers which can be bought from your favourite make-up store, and fill them with any lotions, ointments, balms, unguents, pastes and other colloids I might need. Obviously you can't use this method for products which are pressurized (shaving cream/gel), as well as fragrances. For the ...


4

You do not have to use the body scanner for TSA Pre-Check. Most of the time they don't even have the body scanner in that line. And when I go to an airport that doesn't have a separate TSA pre-check line, like LGA in NY, they give you a card that says TSA pre-check and they send you through the metal detector. Even if you don't have pre-check you can opt ...


4

In theory, I think you could, but I wouldn't recommend trying. As far as I can determine, the TSA has taken no public position on the permissibility of leeches, and that is all that can be said definitively. But since this is an invitation to speculation, allow me to speculate. The official list of prohibited items are mainly things that can be used as ...


3

Unmarked containers that are of reasonable size can get through, too. I've been using Crest toothpaste that comes in a blue plastic flip-top bottle that is 5 or 6 ounces. The label is shrinkwrapped around it, and removing that removes the size marking, making it an unmarked, but oversize, container. I've flown enough to go through three of them in the past ...



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