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17

Your employer is full of it and sounds dodgy as hell. Canadians do not need a US visa to visit or study in the US, but they most certainly need one for any sort of work, including unpaid internships. Now of course you could lie and say you're visiting the US for some other reason, but like the embassy link above says: All Canadians are reminded that ...


5

¥20,000 cash, plus a credit card, is lots for an overnight and a transit to Narita (I live in Tokyo). Where you are from and what you look like is usually a much bigger factor with Japanese immigration than how much cash you have - in 15 years of travel they have yet to ask me a single question at immigration. FYI, you won't be able to do much in Tokyo. ...


4

According to Timatic you are eligible to 'Transit Without Visa' (TWOV) as long as you connecting flight departs within 24 hours. TWOV (Transit Without Visa): Visa required, except for Holders of onward tickets transiting Seoul Incheon (ICN), for a max. transit time of 24 hours. You will need to remain "airside" and will not be allowed pass ...


4

Don't you hate that? ;) Sadly, no, if you miss a leg of a flight at any point on a ticket, they'll cancel ALL other legs of the flight. So unless you can get yourself to Allentown, you are unable to take that flight. It's for various reasons, logistics, regional pricing, airport taxes, but basically, no, you can't. Similar question here, with the same ...


4

To answer the original question, you would be working illegally. Period. Full stop. Do not pass "Go" and do not return to the USA for 5 years. Go to Detroit from Windsor ( walking distance ) play in a club, get your hotel room and bar bill covered -> also working illegally. Your employer will also come to the attention of INS (and possibly homeland ...


4

Short answer - you're good! Longer answer... Germany normally requires a visa for Indian nationals, even if only in transit - however there are a number of exceptions that allow air-side transit without visa (TWOV). One of those exceptions is if you have a Canadian visa, and you are in transit either on the way to Canada, or on the way to your home ...


3

Firstly, go and read this answer to understand the difference between a "layover" and a "stopover". For international flights, breaks between flights of up to 24 hours are generally considered layovers (although the exact rules vary from airline to airline), and thus are generally not charged extra. Anything over 24 hours in a location is a stop-over, and ...


3

Usually, in the Commonwealth countries like Canada, Australia, NZ etc. if you're in transit and not exiting the airport, the immigration officials will not even look at you, so you shouldn't have any issues at all unless you want to leave the airport. Of course you will also have to make sure your bags are checked in all the way to Mexico, because bag ...


3

According to Transit Visa Regulation for Indian Residents:  3. Indian nationals can Transit without Visa via FRA or MUC if holding a valid visa for the destination and a valid Visa for any of the following countries Bulgaria, Canada, Cyprus, Ireland, Japan, Liechtenstein, Romania, UK and USA (the approval notice I-797 is not valid document for ...


2

The point of the 'sufficient funds' test is to see if you will risk getting into financial strife during your time in the country. Many countries test this, and there's no hard or fast rule for how much cash you'll need. When considering your access to funds, the officer will take a number of factors into account: how much money you have access to how ...


2

Hmm... Technically, I suppose all of these answers are somewhat opinion-based, but I would personally plan a bit longer than 1.5 hrs for a layover to an international flight at ATL. I usually try to plan at least that long even for domestic layovers there. While Michael is correct that, if you did miss your flight, they would put you on the next available ...


2

If your flight into Atlanta is domestic (originating in the US), you should be fine. The International terminal is quite a ways away from the domestic terminal, but the light train goes there. On the return, 1.5 hours may be cutting it close, as you'll have to go through customs during that time. But for your outbound flight, I expect no problem.


2

Atlanta airport is huge (the biggest in the world, IIRC), but well organised. If your baggage is checked through, one and a half hours are enough for transit between a domestic flight to an international flight. The train that connects the terminals is very easy to find and use. Of course, if your arrival is delayed you might still miss the connection, but ...


2

This is called a stopover and should be no problem. You might need to pay a little more or use more expensive fares to be able to do it. Concretely, if you are not going through a travel agent, you need to book your travel as a “multi-city” trip on the airline's website. If you book it that way (and not as several one-way trips), it will be a single ticket, ...


2

I think so, yes. This map shows that all the gates are accessible off a common area: -- http://www.luton-airport-guide.co.uk/terminal-map.html My only issue is that the map doesn't show security (though it lists a legend item for it) and neither does it show security on the ground floor map. So it's possible (though unlikely) that there are security ...


2

Since Emirates and Air Asia uses separate terminals at KLIA, you will be required to pass through Malaysian Immigration, and Timatic states: Malaysia (MY) Passport required. - Passport and/or passport replacing travel documents must be valid at least six months on date of arrival. So yes, I would recommend you renew your passport first if at all ...


1

In principle, the Romanian visa should exempt you from any airport transit visa requirement but a Palestinian passport is a bit specific (for obvious political reasons, Palestine cannot be listed as a country in the relevant regulations) so I am not entirely sure which rules apply. You should probably contact the relevant consulate, the airline or the ...


1

I've been to Japan many times and have never been asked anything like this. In any case, in the extremely rare chance that they do say something, a copy of your flight itinerary (which shows you're leaving Japan the next morning) and your 20,000 Yen should be totally fine. Where are you staying? If you are staying with a friend, make sure you know their ...


1

Japanese visa applications are processed by actual humans, so you can eg. write both dates of arrival in the form, state purpose as "Transit x 2", and note that you want a double-entry visa in the "Remarks" section of the application. In my experience, Japanese embassies are both very meticulous at following rules and helpful at advising applicants how to ...


1

When you say "for 24 hours" do you mean a little longer or little less than 24 hours? If you, as you wrote, intend to leave the airport, you'll need to go through border control. You can apply for a Visitor in Transit visa, which will let you leave the airport. You will need to prove that you intend to leave the UK within 48 hours, for example by showing ...


1

According to this document, you do not need a transit visa. This is because you stay in the transit zone (Croatia is not a Schengen member) and as a South-African you do not feature on the list of countries which need a transit visa: Afghanistan Kamerun Äthiopien Kongo (dem. Republik) Bangladesch Nigeria Eritrea Pakistan Ghana ...



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