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27

This ploy is known as "hidden-city ticketing", and you should find plenty written about it if you search for that term. For example, Nate Silver wrote an article about it; that caused some controversy, and there was a followup on the ethics of the practice.


26

Unlike many other countries, US airport do not have any form on physical immigration controls when you are departing the country on an international flight. In fact, in most airports there isn't even a concept of an "International" terminal/gate, with the same gates frequently being used for international flights and domestic flights. As a result of this ...


21

Well it's not like they will track you down and force you to go to STL however... once you skip a leg of a itinerary they will cancel the rest of the booked trip including the return ticket. By booking a ticket you are actually signing a type of contract with the airline and the airlines specifically put in "tariff and fair clauses" that say if you ditch ...


18

There is an official "minimum connecting time" for each airport. For international airports, there are usually separate "minimum connecting times" specified for domestic to domestic, domestic to international, international to domestic, and international to international. At larger airports there may even be longer minimum connecting times when you are ...


17

There's a good article to answer your question on the Washington Post website: All those jokes comparing Snowden’s case to the Tom Hanks film “The Terminal”? They have a distinctly unromantic basis in the life of Iranian Mehran Karimi Nasseri, who lived in Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport for 18 years after Iran expelled him.


17

In short, Putin's wrong, or at least oversimplifying drastically. Airport transit areas are exempted from immigration regulations, but they are very much the country's property, under its authority and jurisdiction. As a simple example, if you're transiting via an airport and are caught carrying contraband there, you'll be punished under the transit ...


17

Your employer is full of it and sounds dodgy as hell. Canadians do not need a US visa to visit or study in the US, but they most certainly need one for any sort of work, including unpaid internships. Now of course you could lie and say you're visiting the US for some other reason, but like the embassy link above says: All Canadians are reminded that ...


15

Be aware that doing this can go wrong very quickly in the event of "irregular operations", such as bad weather, canceled flights, etc. When you book a ticket FLL->ORD->STL the airline is committing to fly you from FLL to STL. They are not required to get you there via ORD. If the FLL-ORD flight is canceled for some reason then it's possible they would ...


14

For instance, flying from Europe into Latin America can imply transiting through an US airport. What are your experiences with these kind of connections? I had a connection at Miami Int'l Airport last spring while en route from London to San José (Costa Rica), and based on that experience, I'd guesstimate that 2-3 hours is good to have. (Myself I had 5+ ...


13

Jonik's recommendation of 2-3 hours is a good average time, but several factors might influence the amount of time you should give yourself: 1) How large the airport you are connecting through is. Smaller airports typically mean less traffic so lines will be shorter. However, some larger airports are more efficient than small ones (so lines move quicker). ...


13

If it's a one-way flight, it should be fine. If it's round-trip, though, you may forfeit the return portion of your trip if you don't use all of the legs of your outgoing trip. I suggest checking with the airline before doing this, unless you're willing to forfeit the rest of your itinerary.


12

Most US airports (IAD, DTW, JFK, ATL, etc.) have separate terminals for international and domestic flights - arrivals and departures. And more often than not, the two terminals are separated by at least a (internal) transit ride. Moreover, in addition to the immigration lines, all international transit passengers are required to collect their baggage AND ...


12

You should not have any problems at immigration. Nobody will force you to go through immigration straight away and immigration won't care which flight you arrived with. They will not mind giving you a stamp at 1 minute past midnight. The only question is whether the airline will allow you to board the plane. It would seem logical to me that they will let ...


11

If this is a single ticket, and the airline is willing to sell it to you with that connection, then any financial risk is theirs. If your transAtlantic flight gets in late, or the airport is crowded, then they will have to put you on their next flight. If your luggage doesn't make the connection, then they will have to compensate you for that somehow. So if ...


11

That depends. If you booked the flights together at the same time, luggage will usually be "checked through" to your final destination. If you booked them separately, especially if it's different airlines, you'll probably have to pick up your luggage and check it in again. In any case, the airline employee at your original checkin can tell you whether your ...


11

Many years ago there used to be free showers at Changi, but they have since been removed. Today the options are : The Ambassador Transit Hotels as you've listed in terminals 1, 2 and 3 (SGD $8.56, including a free non-alcoholic drink) The Ambassador Transit Lounge in terminals 2 and 3 (same price as above) The Rooftop Pool at the Ambassador Transit Hotel ...


10

First of all it depends what nationality you are. I assume you are from a country that is part of the US visa waiver program. In this case you don't need a visa but you do need a travel authorization (ESTA) even if you are only changing planes in the US without leaving the airport. Source: ESTA-FAQ of the Department of Homeland Security. So there is no ...


10

When you buy two separate tickets, if you miss your connection the airline won't help you. As far as they're concerned, your first flight coming in late is like your car breaking down on the way to the airport - unfortunate, but nothing to do with them. When you buy connecting tickets, once you check in onto the first flight, you're theirs and they will look ...


10

Yes, there is. However, information on internet is quite poor, therefore I describe my own experiences here. On 21 December 2012, I travelled from Gran Canaria airport via Las Palmas, Agaete, Santa Cruz de Tenerife and Los Cristianos to Santa Cruz de La Palma. The ferry company Fred Olsen operates many ferry-bus connections. I will describe my experiences ...


10

According to the UK Border Agency, you do need an "airside transit" visa. It appears that this will require a visit to the British Embassy in La Paz, mailing your passport to Brazil, and paying a fee of US$86. You might want to consider a flight which transits through a Schengen country instead.


10

As you're going from Terminal 5 to Terminal 1 you will need to re-clear security, and your duty free liquids will not be allowed through regardless of how they are packaged. Normally the solution to this would be to put the duty free in your checked luggage after clearing customs, but given that you're on a "pre-cleared" flight you are correct in that your ...


10

The good news first - Delta do "interline" bags with Aeroflot, so she will be able to check the bags all the way through to Moscow. If the two flights are booked on the one ticket this should happen automatically. If they are on different tickets, then you will need to show a printout of the e-ticket when checking in with Delta. Either way, be sure to ...


10

Yes, completely possible but depends on your ticket. Just one example, Korean Air allows stopovers for up to a month in Seoul if you travel between two cities (Say London and Sydney) with them. Do note that the cheapest fares often do not permit this, and it is quite hard to find travel websites that will cater for these stopovers. (Go direct to the airline ...


10

Travel between US states never requires presenting a visa. When boarding the plane, you will be required to present a valid, current ID, but they won't check your visa status then. Only if you raise suspicion in some manner (trying to carry knives on board or something), is anyone likely to inquire about visa status. One exception would be that if you end ...


9

The answer depends entirely on the nationality of the traveler, which country they are traveling to, and which specific airport they are traveling through in Canada - but in general most flights through Canada airports do require you to pass through Canadian Immigration, and thus if you require a Visa to enter Canada, you will need one to transit too. Star ...


9

You will be able to check your luggage all the way from Casablanca to Newark. Lufthansa and United are closely related, and luggage transfers between them are not a problem. If all three flights are on the same ticket then this will happen automatically - but it's worth checking the tags as they put it on the luggage to make sure. It should have a list of ...


9

Presuming you are arriving from a non-Schengen country then you will not need to pass through immigration in Munich. You will remain air-side, although you may need to go through security depending on which terminal you arrive in/depart from. However even if you do need to clear immigration in Munich you'll find it very quick and easy (presuming you come ...



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