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31

Easy, since I've done this trip. In Yekaterinburg, go to the markets and get some base food. Whatever drinks you want, but vodka will be good to share if you're the sharing type (especially in platzkart class). Water too, especially in summer. You'll want snacks, try and not take anything smelly (Strong cheese, fish that might smell in heat). I highly ...


21

First of all, you must be prepared to such trip - it is 4 days long from Moscow to Mongolia (with changes), and you should get some stuff like electronic books or films. Also you should think about possibilities of recharging your electronical devices - charges are available not in all trains and not at each stations. After those choices, I recommend you ...


20

The legal technicalities are as follows: What is registered is an alien's stay (not visa). While an alien is en route, no legal obligation of being registered exists. It is hosts' duty to register their alien guests. The latest edition of the law on registration even explicitly states that under no circumstances aliens may be held responsible for ...


18

Any recommendations as to where? Firstly, you should choose the trains. For now, you have such options: Direct train 020Щ(sch) "Vostok" ("East") Moscow (departure at 23:55 PM every Saturday) - Beijing (arrival at l5:32 AM every Saturday), do not goes through Mongolia. Direct train 004З Moscow (departure at 21:35 PM every Tuesday) - Beijing ( arrival ...


16

You're very unlikely to get them rejected if you go through an agency, as they'll make sure you have all the right information before they submit it to the various government departments. I use http://www.visatorussia.com/ in 2008 to get a tourist visa, and this year for a 3 month double entry business visa, and both times they were fantastic. Both ...


14

It certainly can be done -- is it reasonable, well that depends on your definition ... You're going to have two major issues here. Visas You likely need visas for the places you're visiting (Russia, Mongolia, China), and they will need proof of onwards travel. You'll likely have to get a specialist to help anyway and the overall visa validity is going ...


14

I did (Kyoto)-Beijing-Moscow-(Stockholm) last december. In Russia we travelled mostly on domestic trains of various kinds (the Trans-Mongolian have some russian cars attached in Russia which allow domestic travel), using mostly "Kupe" 4-bed compartments. We made most planning and booking as we travelled. We used the RZD web booking at ...


13

Random thoughts: When packing some food for the trip I really recommend going to a big store and getting things you know well. I recommend to avoid kvass if you didn't drink it a lot before. Same thing for kefir and its relatives. They can be a digestion problem for those who are not accustomed to them. Any fermented food is not a good option ...


13

As I know, in Russia visas can be achived for two ways: By the invitation from some people or company in Russia, and I think this is not for you, because it not very stable way to get visa. By the touristic trip or voucher. This can be made by travel agencies. Try to choose famous one, like http://nevatravel.ru/ Also in some cities you can stay for three ...


11

Firstly, that's not where the Trans-Siberian railway goes. You'll need to disconnect and take the train from Nososibirsk down to Almaty (35 hours). From there you're out of luck, train-wise. You get a shared taxi or bus across the border from Almaty to Bishkek (it's very easy, the bus drops you off at the border, you cross, and it meets you on the other ...


10

I was looking into the same journey recently and the best resource I found was seat61 http://www.seat61.com/Trans-Siberian.htm#Visas I talked to one of the agencies they recommend http://www.realrussia.co.uk/ They knew what they were doing, they quickly responded and sent us quotes and paperwork for both my husband and I (Australian and English passports). ...


10

There is no changes in rules, because the carrier is the same - RZD. About the dog transit rules: You must have all medical information about pet, and you must pay for additional ticket. Also you must honor the sanitary rules in the train you are using. There are two options for this transit - and it depends on size of the dog. For small dogs the rules ...


10

In addition, consider to take some Doshirak lunchboxes (it's usual for Russians), fast oatmeals, buns or cakes and at least 2 bottles of still water (not lemonade!). It's also OK to take apples or other fruits, except of oranges (oranges are not the best choice for travelers), cucumbers. Drink tea for saving your own water. Be sure you have plenty of ...


9

Eating utensils A mug is a must. Also, a spoon, a fork and a knife might be really useful. A bowl is also good to have if you have enough space. Of course, make sure these are from plastic so that they will not break if fall down to floor, and make sure they are suitable for hot water. Paper napkins is also good to have. Where to shop Avoid shopping ...


9

Right, so after thinking about how I'd answer this... Why packing is an individual thing Each to their own. Some friends backpacked South America and New Zealand with day packs. Others take extra luggage and suitcases. It all depends on what you think you'll need. Odds are you'll overestimate - you never need everything. It's easier to pack less, and ...


8

@SpaceDog gives a decent answer, but I would like to argue that it's both possible and reasonable. If you're going to do the journey in installments, which it seems to me you're thinking of, your only option is not to travel on the trans-siberian (or trans-mongolian) only. There are plenty of train connections that travel parts of the long journey and it's ...


7

There is actually a direct train from Moscow to Dushanbe, at least in June 2014 when I was in Dushanbe. According to information on Caravanistan the train leaves Moscow at 12.08 and arrives in Dushanbe at 16.14 5 days later. They also write that you need several visa, in Addition to Russian and Tajik, a Kazakh transit visa, and a double-entry Uzbek visa. ...


6

Chinese tourist visas are normally for 30 days but they can issue longer if you have a reason for needing longer or you have been to China before. You shouldn't have any problem getting a visa unless you know of some impediment. You can renew a tourist visa for another 30 days and then again for another 30 days giving you a total of 90 days if you need it. ...


6

I can't say for all train companies (as I don't know what your route will be), but I can make a guess for the main part of your journey (you will definitely travel using russian trains): Train tickets for the Trans-Mongolian train are available up to 60 days from departure day. So you can buy the tickets far before documents will be returned to you from ...


6

There is hot water in each carriage, so do for drinking instant coffee or tea is a good choice. If you want to "eat cheap", instant noodles / instant food is the right choice for you. Otherwise, the food in the dining car is also very good, you will get typical Russian food, and also it is not that expensive (usually US$5 - 8 in Rouble).


6

I traveled from Hong Kong via China and Mongolia to Moscow in August 2012 (supposedly peak season) with numerous stops on the way and without pre-booking any ticket more than a few days in advance. You must be prepared to use a few tricks though: Sometimes you won't get a direct route - be creative. For example, Beijing - Erlian (on border with Mongolia) ...


5

Seat61 is the best site concerning train travel in Europe. It also has a section about a train travel from London to Peking. There are a lot of practical tips, hints and suggestions. A very detailed section also covers the Visa details of all countries you travel trough.


5

I don't think that there will be some special actions in November for Russian Railways. May be some additional trains for the Unity Day, but this isn't the case for you. But I have a good news for you - there always some discounts depending on the train, and some special pricing for international trains. Bad news is that the main interesting actions are in ...


5

A couple of friends made the full trip from Moskow to Vladivostok some years ago. They stopped at least at Yekaterinburg and Irkutsk, possibly Novosibirsk as well.


5

When I did the trip a few years back, I stopped in Yekaterinburg, Irkutsk (side trip to Baikal is definitely worthwhile), and Ulan Bator. Yekaterinburg is not a particular exciting city, but it provides a very nice (practically necessary) stop over. My general advice is to stop frequently enough that you don't spend more than 48 hours at a time on the ...


4

I did the Trans-Siberian a couple of years ago, I can definitely recommend Irkutsk and Ulan Bator (for the Beijing section), they are great cities and areas to stop and also very unique. Novosibirsk I found less interesting, there wasn't much to see or do, I would not stop there again. I heard good things about Tomsk, but you need to plan extra time, it's ...


3

Since you're looking to do it "on the cheap", here are some money-saving tips: The best tip I know of is to use the cheaper local trains only (ones that don't cross international borders) to get right up to the border, then cross the border on land, and continue by train on the other side. (Wikitravel has plenty of info on both Russia/Mongolia and ...


3

About buying tickets for the trans-siberian - you can buy them up to 60 days before the trip. Also you can get some discounts on return tickets to the Mongolia. About obtaining visa for such trip


3

Yes, Russian Railways uses prices, that depend on season. You can see it (but only in Russian) for 2015, previous years were the same. Usually from mid-September to a week before New Year's Holidays tickets are 10% cheaper. Also, Russian Railways has a good tradition to set 50% discount for everyone on Victory Day. But in other holidays tickets has higher ...


3

I think the choice of luggage very much depends on the type of trip you are planning to do. If you are doing standard backpacking trip, when you need to carry your stuff mainly for short distances from a hotel to a bus or train, then it makes sense to have a bigger backpack with more clothes/stuff to make your journey more comfortable, and have some spare ...



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