New answers tagged

4

I used to be travelling a lot by railjet, and the maximum delay I got was 30 minutes, and that happened only once, altogether. (It was around when the immigrants came in and rushed on the train). I took the railjet mostly from Budapest to Wien and backwards, and about twice a month from Salzburg to Budapest and back. I think it is reliable, but its mostly my ...


7

I have unfortunately no statistics on the Railjets being on time. However, I have an answer to the second part of your question: If that train doesn't go [...] will my ticket be valid for the 13:08-18:19? If it is expected that the first train that will leave after the departure time as printed on your ticket, will arrive at least one hour after the ...


1

Well, I can't provide a general answer (so anyone who lives locally or otherwise knows better should still answer), however I can provide a single experience: Arriving almost exactly 30 minutes before scheduled departure, we were the last vehicle to be permitted to board the train. Some 6-10 cars were turned away, and presumably made the drive over the ...


2

I'll just stick this on as an answer for completeness (I previously posted it as a comment): I took 3 DB rides without the card used to book the tickets with no problem. On all 3 of my train rides, there was no trouble explaining my situation and showing my passport as ID, no need to repurchase tickets, and no "you should bring your credit card next time" ...


3

As a German who travels often with the Bahn: Forget the whole thing. While it was in earlier times possible to buy tickets inside the train, the Deutsche Bahn has now a much more rigid approach: Not only are people prohibited from entering the train if they have no ticket (even if the only vending machine is out of order), the conductors have the order to ...


9

If it is a "e-billet" (e-ticket), what you've printed in the station is just a reminder and you can reprint it the same way with your "reference client" (the 6-letter code) and the payment card you used (to identify you). If it is a "classic" ticket ("IATA" in SNCF language), you have to buy a new one. You can look in the confirmation mail you received ...


6

Yes you'll have to pay for your bike spot, but only if your trip includes a TGV segment. The map you're showing is for intercités which is another type of train and does not seem to run the route you want. If you search on the SNCF website with your itinerary you'll see you're allowed a free spot for the bike on the segment from Saint-Malo to Rennes, but ...


7

There are three kind of solutions: Expensive and fast : train (capitainetrain.com), plane (airfrance.com, hop.com) Fast and cheap : sharing a ride (blablacar.fr), plane (volotea.com, easyjet.com, ryanair.com) Slow and cheap : buses (flixbus, megabus, ouibus, isilines, eurolines) => You can use goeuro.com to check prices and durations (that site includes ...


7

At Busbud, a bus search tool I work for, we did a little study on the price of bus vs blablacar ride sharing in France. It's in French, hopefully you can get the gist of it: bus is often cheaper but it's worth checking both options. Here are some of the relevant bus companies that partner with Busbud in France and from France to Spain: Ouibus, Flixbus, ...


6

There are now a couple tools to compare the prices of train/bus/rideshares. Two examples are Comparabus and kelbillet. Trying these for a trip in October, 3 months ahead of time, the bus costs from 35 to 50 euros to Bayonne/Hendaye (in my experience, for such distances the price does not vary too much, even a week in advance), the rideshares are available ...


11

I would definitely check Blablacar.fr. There's always a connection that suits your needs.


3

Bus will be the cheapest way to get down there. You will probably have to change bus at some point as close to Hendaye as possible as there doesn't seem to be a direct bus line to there (AFAIK) from Lille. Check/Google the various bus services. A quick search with http://www.eurolines.fr/fr/ returns a 50euro itinerary from Lille to Biarritz.


-1

Those $500 are due if you did not have a valid ticket. DB has classic tickets, usually printed out at the station, and online tickets. If you print your online ticket yourself, it would be easy to print it several times, so the printout itself isn't enough. When you order an online ticket, you specify how you are planning to validate it. With the ...


9

I did a similar trip last month. The border officials in Brest only put an entry stamp on my Belarus visa. I don't recall them even looking at the Russian visa or asking where I was going after transiting Belarus. (Almost all trains stop in Minsk where you can change, even on a transit visa, so it's not a foregone conclusion that you are travelling ...


1

It seems that this special day ticket can be used at any time during one calendar day, like a regular day ticket. NS regularly offers special deals for day tickets like that. The problem is that you also need to print it out (that's the e-ticket option) or to have an anonymous OV-chipkaart on which you could load the ticket (the card itself costs EUR 7.50).


4

Pay at the counter Every train station except rural stops has a ticket counter, where you can buy tickets for immediate departure or up to 90 days in advance. They take cash and ask no questions (other than your destination and departure date). Larger stations have a dedicated Reisezentrum (travel center), in smaller stations the counter may be hidden in ...


7

In addition to Omega Terus' answer: Some of the self-service machines only accept coins, which can be a problem if you didn't anticipated it and all shops / counters are closed. If possible you can try to buy the ticket early (a day early, few hours early) so you have some time to gather coins if needed. Source: Own experience, ~ 7 years ago.


17

You can buy Deutsche Bahn tickets at a train station with cash, either at the counter (if you are at a manned station within the counter opening hours) or in the self-service machine (at any time). You won't need any card for that, not even your ID or passport.


2

You can catch the Hampton Jitney bus (no relation) every 15-30 minutes all day from Manhattan to Manorville, then a taxi back to Brookhaven National Laboratory. The taxi fare may be quite a bit cheaper this way than from Ronkonkoma as the distance is shorter. It may also be faster, depending on time of day, since the bus has only one stop between Manhattan ...


1

I messaged my advisor and she informed me that I would need to take the train from Penn station to Ronkonkoma and then Taxi to BNL. Thanks for the help.


7

I'd say Lille (in Belgium they might call it Rijsel.) You can get there in 39 minutes with the fast trains and if you are lucky you do not need to pay more than 19 Euro, but 25 Euro is more likely. Those fast direct trains run hourly at least, there are also normal (less fast) trains which have no restriction on the number of tickets sold, but might require ...


1

It's probably not the oldest, and the attraction isn't open yet, but it is possibly the quirkiest: Photo by Richard Pope, CC-BY, from https://www.flickr.com/photos/memespring/311144302/in/photostream/ Mailrail was a narrow gauge, underground railway used for moving post and mail around London. It closed in 2003, however, at some time in the near future (...


4

It's above ground and it's not in regular service, but the good folks at Market Street Railway in San Francisco occasionally roll out streetcar No. 578, built in 1896. I rode it last September: http://imgur.com/gallery/zw3fP


7

Officially, or at least from Wikipedia: As of June 2006, the card has been interchangeable with the Wuxi Tai-Lake Transportation Card, and can also be used in Suzhou. So it can be used in at least one other major city. It doesn't look like it'll work in Beijing, however.


2

If there is an overnight train involved, you need to book as you are sure you are going to take that train. Night trains are often 'reserved only' and when they run out of reservations, you are out of the train. For all long distance trains it is better to book early, specially if the tickets come with a seat reservation. Most trains in Europe allow you to ...


3

There are few benefits for buying in advance : You'll most likely get better prices, especially during summer period You'll have a seat confirmed If you don't book in advance, then you'll potentially pay a very expensive price (there is not really last minute discount for trains) and you might have troubles to find a seat for the time you'd like to ...


3

Many heritage railways in the UK offer such a service - a quick search for "Steam Locomotive Driing Experience" brings up loads. There is also the Wolstyn experience www.thewolsztynexperience.org in Poland, which allows you to drive a steam locomotive in regular service.


3

Russian Railways have steam locomotive trips. Schedule and programme varies, I'm yet to try it myself. http://rzdtour.com/ Doesn't seem to have an English version.


0

I concur that it might be possible. It is possible to upgrade your class: if you have platzkart, you may upgrade to kupe while on board. Therefore, they do know on board which seats are empty and which are available. So, you might be able to do that, seek out the "director of the train" (yeah that's a hilarious title). It might also be available ...


10

The answer is no. A reserved train ticket in India is usually issued for a specific train for a specific day/time, and therefore on any later train / day it won't be valid and you won't have a reservation. You might have been able to use the "break journey" rules defined by Indian Rail if you were travelling on a longer train journey - just not in the this ...


5

I took this bag to Japan and stored it in coin lockers at train stations in both Akihabara and Shinjuku (both in Tokyo): 26 inch roller bag (Amazon link). According to Amazon, this bag is 26 inches tall, 11 inches long, and 15 inches wide. (66cm x 28cm x 35cm). I took a picture of it in a "large" sized locker. This one was at the Shinjuku station, but the ...


5

For practically any train route in Russia where important long-distance trains pass and at all stations where they stop for more than ten minutes, you can expect an army of babooshkas to be waiting, selling their self-made food. In my experience (travelling Moscow–Sludyanka and back), what they sell is pretty good both in taste and in price. So these are ...


7

During that time of year, the connection Hamburg–Copenhagen is very busy. Before they introduced compulsory reservation in the summer months, I had a train that was so full, I had to almost physically fight my way to my resered seat, and this almost happened. (They did leave in the end — with a delay — but still very packed.) Thus, you should reserve a seat ...


2

The accepted answer is not working anymore as the city night line trains are taken out of the timetables. So now your best bet will be to travel fast by day and/or travel by ferry at night. Seat 61 suggests that you might use the Harwich to Hook of Holland ferry overnight, taking a day train to Hamburg, take a train the next day via Copenhagen to Stockholm ...


1

To add to the answer and comments above, yes there is wifi in some trains and yes it's free. Sadly also, yes, it's slow. There is no way to determine what train will have wifi when planning your route, it won't even be certain that if you take a train that leaves every day at let's say 10.00 it will have wifi every day because trains get switched up a lot. ...


3

Just book a seat reservation only, without a ticket, if you are worried. Pick a train, select book without registering to pay with paypal or credit card, and print your reservation


1

Your Russian/Belarusian migration card should always be in your passport booklet. Once you approach the border, there will be a stop somewhere close by. I don’t know where the stop is on your route, but on the typical Warsaw–Minsk route from Poland, Poland performs their border controls in Terespol and Belarus in what looks like barracks with a platform ...


3

Not too long ago, you needed to book a Sparpreis (savings fare) ticket three calendar days in advance. Then it changed to one day. Now, the official site explicitly says: The "Sparpreis" (saver fare for Germany) is for sale 91 days before intended travel date up until shortly before departure. (Emphasis mine) I personally haven’t tried getting a ticket ...


2

There are no student discounts available for DB tickets — neither for school nor for university students. Everybody aged 14 or older is required to pay the adult fare, no exceptions.[1] However, I wouldn’t blatantly discard the option of a BahnCard. There is a so-called Probe BahnCard (trial BahnCard) which only costs €19 but gives you the full 25 % ...


0

Reservations are optional on most ICE trains, notably including those Cologne–Brussels. Since you are travelling first class, there will be seats available, so there will be no need to reserve.


2

As Volodymyr mentioned, the train is called Sapsan, Russian for peregrine falcon. It is a Siemens-built high-speed train based on the ICE 3 running in Germany and Siemens calls it Velaro RUS. Formerly, they not only served Moscow–Saint Petersburg but also Moscow–Nizhnyi Novgorod, but they were phased out of the latter in favour of Talgo trains in 2015. You ...


6

If you are in the situation, train staff not helpful, late at night, no trains to get you anywhere, buses stopped for the night and only taxis to get you where you need to go, you have three options. Take a taxi (or call for one if you need to.) Stay in/near the station till the service starts again. Call a friend or relative to come and collect you. Call ...


16

First, it is very, very unlikely for German ICEs to have all seats reserved. Many Germans don’t reserve their seats because they either have season tickets or a non-fixed itinerary or don’t want to pay the reservation fee. (This may change once reservations are included in the ticket price, but that has recently been postponed to a later, unannounced date.) ...


5

If you are travelling terminus to terminus on a ICE train it is unlikely that you will not be able to find a seat, especially if you are not travelling at peak business times. I have used ICE trains before without reserving and never struggled to find a seat. Just check the small display above the seat and be prepared to move if a seat is free now but not ...


8

You would have to stand, unless there are too many people standing, so that escape ways would be blocked. In that case at first they would ask for volunteers to vacate the train (they might get some vouchers etc.). If that doesn't work out, then the police will come and remove some passengers (without getting vouchers). The last case happened some times in ...


4

Assuming you are departing from Venezia Santa Lucia, there is a left-luggage office near track 1. Opening hours are from 6 am till 11 pm and cost is Charges 6,00 € the first 5 hours 0,90 € /hour from 6th to 12th hour 0,40 € /hour from 13th hour on If possible however, you should try to ask your hotel if they can store your luggage for you ...


2

It depends what exactly you mean by "outside of Japan". The intent of the policy is that you should buy it in your home country before leaving for Japan, but the policy was put in place before the advent of this wonderful (?) thing called the Internet. So in effect the policy is that you must buy the exchange order from a seller which is based in a country ...


1

It is important to know however that you have to have a tourist visa or come from one of the countries and regions for visa exceptions: http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/short/novisa.html. It's almost 70 countries now, including USA, Australia and most European ones, so by presenting one of these passports you should have no problem. For the rest of ...


4

This answer is assuming you have a through ticket from St. Pancras to your final destination in France/Belgium/Germany/whereever. I am not certain whether this also applies to a journey made up of two separate tickets unrelated to each other. For trains that operate within the European Union under the directive 95/18/EC (that is basically any train except ...


3

As someone who regularly visited that route (Ahmedabad to Thane), I advise you take an overnight train (preferably Gujarat Mail) or ADI-BCT superfast. Choose the one that has a halt at Borivali (Duranto doesn't; it has only one stop: Mumbai Central). For morning, double-decker is a good option. This is because Thane is located to the east of Mumbai and ...



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