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12

The trains you want are either "G trains" or "C trains". They are both rated at up to 350 kph but G designations are for longer distances and C for shorter routes. Some information on types and speeds here "Shorter" is relative. You can get 2 hours G train journeys. The above page notes G – High-Speed Electric Multiple Units (EMU) Train This is the ...


9

It should be instant. Source: Italian and booked hundreds of trains (two yesterday). Anyway, you only need the Booking Code (PNR) in order to board the train and that should also be shown during the last step of the booking process, a page that the Trenitalia site suggests to print. You can also log in and go in the customer area. At the bottom of the ...


8

Generally speaking, TGV tickets are bound to a specific train connection. Higher fares (pro ticket) allow free exchanges and refunds but I think you are still supposed to do it prior to boarding (even a few minutes before, traditionally with dedicated machines in the station's concourse but there is now a mobile app as well) rather than just showing up in ...


6

Some rules explained here (in French): http://aide.voyages-sncf.com/toute-laide-train/suite-mon-achat/echange-et-annulation/conditions-d-echange-d-annulation-et-de-remboursement And a version in English : http://help.en.voyages-sncf.com/en/exchange-cancellation/conditions It depends on which fare you have paid when booking your ticket. TGV are in the ...


6

The typical way to get to Sentosa from anywhere in Singapore to Sentosa is to take the MRT to Harbourfront and then take the Sentosa Express LRT from there. I suggest you use the website gothere.sg where you can just enter something like "City Hall to Sentosa" and it will then show you different options to get there, including the prices. There is of course ...


6

Per the official site, trains run three times a day, every day of the year (毎日運転). However, there are a few periods when some runs of the special train with wood paneling and panorama windows etc are replaced by an 'ordinary' express: Nr. 1/2/5/6 replaced: Sep 9-11, Nov 17-21, Jan 13-Feb 13 Nr. 3/4 replaced: Oct 6-10, Dec 16-18 Do note that while all ...


5

There are a handful of high speed trains between Bruges and Brussels, but they're not very much quicker than the regular ones. So, unless you have a strong reason to take one of them (eg it's part of a longer Thalys or ICE journey), I'd suggest you skip those, and just go for the regular SNCB trains. Between Brussels and Bruges, you've basically got one ...


5

You are correct, the station at Frankfurt airport is called Frankfurt(M)Flughafen. It is divided into two parts called Frankfurt(M) Flughafen Fernbf (for intercity trains) and Frankfurt(M) Flughafen Regionalbf (for regional trains). The DB website will recommend whatever option is best for you when you enter Frankfurt(M)Flughafen (most likely the Fernbf). ...


5

According to the website of the local transport association VRR a single trip costs 16,50€ (just enter the trip into the search mask and click the "E" button to see the price). You can buy the ticket at the station. There is no open return ticket (but if you want to travel on the same day, or more often there are cheaper options, see that website). If you ...


4

You are right, Frankfurt (M) Flughafen is the Airport railway station. It is very easy to get there, from Terminal 1, just 10 min walking, just follow the signs. Normally, if you buy your tickets online at bahn.de 2-3 weeks before your trip, you can get a 29€ ticket. The prices are depending on the train type: ICE: (InterCityExpress) very fast train, ...


4

I've travelled with those couchette sleeping carriages quite often and there's really no art to it. Personally I think it's a very comfortable way of travelling and I rarely have problems sleeping on those, in the contrary I think the slight shaking of the trains makes me fall asleep very fast. There's maybe a couple of things you might want to consider. ...


4

Amsnag is what you want. Note that for most Amtrak routes, especially the long distance ones, the base fares are relatively static from one day to the next - they will go up over time though as the cheapest tickets sell out. However the cost of bedroom accommodation can be 50% or even 100% higher from one day to another. On the commuter routes such as the ...


3

I found out that I can set the date when I exchange. More info here: http://www.japan-rail-pass.com/common-questions/can-i-choose-the-days-of-use


3

These TGVs have a different menu to the regular domestic French TGVs! The menu is branded as "b2in", and features the logos of both SNCF and RENFE on it: A pdf of the menu can be found here on the Elipsos site - if that isn't the exact one as found on the TGV last weekend then it's very very close to that! It largely contain the same kinds of things as ...


3

At madarail.mg you can find an overview of current routes. Antananarivo and Antsirabe are not on it (September 2014).


2

On voyages-sncf, the standard booking tool does not provide a field for your "Code Avantage". However, if you go for advanced search, you will find, in the section for the passenger details, a "Promotional Code" field appearing. I know it is not straight forward.


2

If you go to the voyages-sncf webpage, you'll see there's a field called Code avantage. Just type your code in, and the associated discount should be applied.


2

To answer the second part of the question ("is it cheaper/possible to get an open return?"), the answer is no. In Germany, it is very uncommon that open returns are cheaper. Even buying a non-open return ticket will only lead to lower cost in very few cases. Note that as neo wrote, you will probably take the bus first, and as the bus and the train are ...


1

I stayed in Brussels and then used the train system to visit each city I could one by one, while returning to brussels at night for my place to stay. They have '10 fare cards'...it's basically a ticket that has 10 open slots for you to write in...when you get on the train, fill the one line out and the conductor will stamp it when he takes your ticket. ...


1

If you received a ban, it's a ban from the whole Schengen area. If you haven't received a ban, formally you can still (try to) enter any Schengen country, including Poland but the reasons that led to being denied entry in the first place might still hold and the denial itself will weight against you. If they notice the cancelled entry stamp (that should be) ...


1

Rome2Rio says the only sane option is to the fly, and has direct tickets from $140. A bus would take at least 13 hours, with trains clocking in at 17+ hours, with very limited service (once a day or less).



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