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7

Rome2Rio is designed to do precisely this. It covers flights (even low-cost carriers), many trains and busses (both local transit and private long-distance busses), even some ferries I think, and is able to combine them. Icing on the cake is its ability to include some “driving” (taxi/private car) to get to the closest train station or airport as necessary, ...


6

As far as I know, Rome2Rio does this the best, although I don't often search this way - probably would have if the site existed when I lived in Europe...but I digress. For example, if you want to go from Paris, France to Trogir, Croatia, without even specifying dates (although you can for prices), it shows a train + plane option, a train + bus option, and a ...


6

The diabolo fee is something you have to pay on top of a regular ticket to the airport, to fund the extension of the Diabolo project. My understanding is that a regular ticket to or from the airport already includes it but it's also sold separately for people who have another ticket or a rail card and need to pay only the extra fee. The Diabolo fee ...


5

It's a bit more complicated than both other answers let on. You can use trains operated by “DB Bahn”. This includes most long-distance, regional and urban trains but not necessarily all of them as some trains are operated by private companies. The pass does also cover most “S-Bahn” within one city but, again, not all of them. In particular, the S-Bahn in ...


5

The Point is This special offer from DB Bahn enables visitors to travel on all scheduled trains operated by DB Bahn Buses, U-Bahns and trams are not operated by DB. In big cities like Frankfurt you can use the S-Bahn to travel inside the cities though. So you are not limited to the central stations only. The situation about using S-bahn in Berlin ...


5

No, you're not missing things this is standard ticketing policy in the UK. Single tickets frequently cost almost as much as return tickets. Article in The Telegraph discussing train fares


4

First off, don't worry. Japanese train stations have extensive signposting in English and trains run like clockwork. If it's not too late, I'd suggest changing your flights to Nagoya (Chubu/NGO) instead if at all possible. There's a direct bus from Chubu to Toyota (1:18, ¥1750), so this would shave a good three hours off your travel time and save ...


4

Milan city council runs a lost&found service which can be contacted at these phone numbers: +39 02 88453900 +39 02 88453908 +39 02 88453909 They advise you to contact "Polizia ferroviara" and file a report before contacting them but since you skipped this step I'd try to contact them anyway. I wouldn't hold my breath but good luck anyway!


4

As this journey involves changing trains at Sheffield, two different train companies are used. This often means that the cheaper ticket types are not available. You can circumvent this by buying separate tickets for each leg of the journey. For example, using the East Midlands Trains website, for 11th November I found Loughborough to Sheffield Advance ...


3

If your lost bag came back to Bern (and you'd be very lucky) you can try with this web page https://www.ffs.ch/stazione-servizi/servizi/servizio-oggetti-trovati.html If someone found the bags in Italy. I'm very sad to tell this but will be very hard for you to recover that/


2

Malaysians can enter Thailand without a visa for up to 30 days. If you plan to stay longer you need a tourist visa. The Immigration officials may require proof of departure, for which a copy of your flight booking will suffice and they may require proof of financial support, which for a single person is 10,000 Baht or the equivalent in Ringgit (they maybe ...


1

Malaysian citizens do not need a visa to visit Thailand. See the embassy guidelines for visa requirements. So all you would need is a valid passport.


1

Yes, you can travel inside all German cities as long as you use transport systems operated by the DB or others included in the Rail Pass. (list of services covered) Most buses, trams and subways are not covered. Taken from ACPRail: The German Rail Pass is valid on all trains within Germany operated by Deutsche Bahn (DB). You can also travel to the ...



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