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6

2-3pm is not rush hour in Tokyo. However, many central subway stations in Tokyo will require you to climb flights of stairs to enter, exit or transfer lines, which is not much fun with large bags, and while there's usually a single elevator somewhere, this can add a lengthy detour. If you can tell me exactly where you're going, I can try to recommend a ...


4

Yes, there is a direct underground tunnel connecting the two stations (three, actually: Keisei, JR and Tokyo Metro). You will need to exit and re-enter through the fate gates at both ends, but if you're using a Suica/Pasmo smart card the fare calculation will be automatic. (courtesy Google) The vast majority of nearby stations in Tokyo are similarly ...


3

The linked JR map in the question is one of the easier sections of the station to navigate, in my opinion. I've gotten "re-oriented" in the underground areas more times than I care to admit, and it is sometimes easiest to just go outside, find a landmark, and walk in that direction. There is a map of all the platforms (JR, Keio, Odakyu, Toei, and Metro) ...


3

As usual, Hyperdia will show you all available train connections, just be careful to choose "Narita Airport Terminal 1" (or 2) as your departure station and not just "Narita" (the latter is located in downtown Narita city). The Narita Express is the only direct rail link between Narita airport and Shinjuku, but it is also the most expensive one. However, ...


5

It's years since I did this but the airport limousine bus went straight to the hotel (Shinjuku Washington in my case). It looks like it still does. This avoids the need to navigate Shinjuku station just after arriving in Japan, as well as the need to get from the station to the hotel with your luggage -- if the bus stops at your hotel (or the one next ...


9

The Narita Express train runs straight from Tokyo Narita to Shinjuku. Route map: Bear in mind that Shinjuku is a huge station and that it's quite easy to get lost or turned around in it. In light of that it may be helpful to figure out which exit you want to take in advance. Here's a map of the exists: ...


4

One (more) thing to take note of is that the actual locations of bus stands around large stations can be spread out quite significantly. They are usually numbered,but these numbers have no correlation to the bus route number, and AFAIK, Google's transit directions do not consider the exact location either. See the attached image for busses departing from ...


4

I was in Japan a couple of months back (visited both Tokyo and Kyoto as part of the trip), and pretty much everything is written in kanji AND romanised Japanese when it comes to public transport. You don't have to memorise the kanji! :)


17

That's actually the bus line and its destination, and the Google Maps directions already convert both the starting and ending stops into English (well, romanized Japanese). For example, if going from Roppongi to Shibuya, the only sane choice is the 都01 (Metropolitan #1) bus and this is what you get: (courtesy Google) "Ex Theater Roppongimae" ...



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