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24

I'm afraid I can't find any government numbers to back up my anecdotal evidence, but Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro are all very safe - much safer than their equivalents in London, New York or any other 'world' city. I've spent many nights in each, in varying states of sobriety, and never had any problems at all. I've lost my wallet a few times (on trains, ...


22

Only barely. Vegetarianism in general and veganism in particular is very poorly understood in Japan, and this r/japan thread goes into gruesome detail on what a world of pain you're about to find yourself in.The one vegetarian sushi place I'm aware of in Tokyo (Potager) has now closed. The only vegan items you are likely to encounter in the average sushi ...


18

As stated in fkraiem's answer, the relevant legislation applies only in Tokyo (although quite a few other places have similar laws). Here's the section in question: 東京都青少年の健全な育成に関する条例 青少年 十八歳未満の者をいう。 十八歳未満の者をいう (深夜外出の制限) 第十五条の四 保護者は、通勤又は通学その他正当な理由がある場合を除き、深夜(午後十一時から翌日午前四時までの時間をいう。以下同じ。)に青少年を外出させないように努めなければならない。 2 ...


17

You (as well as PLL, who commented and RoboKaren, who answered) need to straighten the confusion here. On the one hand, there is "sushi" (let's call this sushi1), which is an American food, hinted from Japanese cuisine and originated in California, and is usually served by Korean-Americans, Chinese-Americans, or other Americans. It uses normal rice, and is ...


17

That's actually the bus line and its destination, and the Google Maps directions already convert both the starting and ending stops into English (well, romanized Japanese). For example, if going from Roppongi to Shibuya, the only sane choice is the 都01 (Metropolitan #1) bus and this is what you get: (courtesy Google) "Ex Theater Roppongimae" ...


16

Vegan is more than possible in Japan. There are a number of blogs on the topic that I suggest you look at. In terms of the specifics of a sushi restaurant, the vegan basics are: Kappa maki - cucumber roll  カッパ巻き Natto maki - roll with natto 納豆巻き Abokado nigiri/maki - avocado nigiri or maki アボカドにぎり Ume shiso maki - Plums paste with shiso herbs -- see ...


15

While Japanese cuisine uses a lot of seafood, there are plenty of dishes based on beef, poultry, etc. as well as vegetable-based dishes. The problems usually arise when people have allergies or religious/moral objections to fish or shellfish, which might appear "invisibly" in sauces and seasonings. As a vegetarian who is willing to tolerate some "invisible" ...


14

EDIT: I realise this actual is rather off-topic, more dealing with places to get various Japanese foods than the food itself. Hopefully still useful. Just to give a bit more specific detail on particular places, and specifically the cheap places... Generally speaking breakfast comes in 2 varieties - Japanese or "Western". I won't go into crazy detail ...


14

Okonomiyaki and Ramen are both dishes with great variety, available with meat as well as seafood. Then there's Sukiyaki and Shabu-Shabu, various donburi, yakitori, vegetarian sushi variants, omurice... that's all the most common ones, I think.


13

A typical Japanese breakfast consists of rice, miso soup, pickled vegetables and/or salad, fish, and possibly poached/cooked egg or natto. The price for this kind of breakfast starts at around 400 yen (at a family hotel or cheap restaurant). Lunch might be out of a bento box (with contents quite similar to the breakfast minus the soup), or in a restaurant ...


13

The relevant legislation is here (in Japanese). This is only for Tokyo, the legislation in all other prefectures is similar but may differ in some details. Basically, it's "illegal" for parents to allow a minor to go out between 11pm and 4am except for going to work/school or for some other "justifiable reason". What constitutes a "justifiable reason" is as ...


12

I doubt that a JR pass will be worth it for just travel within Tokyo; usually with most rail passes, you need to be making several long-distance trips for it to break even. JR pass would make sense if you planned taking the shinkansen to/from Tokyo, and then you can consider the rail travel within Tokyo to be a "free" benefit. According to this site, a ...


12

I always thought it was to avoid breathing too much pollution or avoid catching diseases from other people. In fact it's the other way around. My Japanese friend always wears one when she has a cold because she doesn't want to infect other people!


12

I'm not sure about the visa part, but about the time: By the cheapest train I seem to recall Narita airport is about two hours from Tokyo. Also you might well have to be back at the airport at least one hour before boarding, and quite possibly more. And the train system in Japan is notoriously complex. It will be very easy to get a bit lost and miss your ...


12

Cycling is generally very safe, particularly in Taito-ku. There aren't any bike lanes really but you're free to cycle on the pavement, as long as you dismount when it's too crowded. Furthermore drivers are used to cyclists, just keep tight to the left on bigger roads. Helmets are seldom worn, even by mothers with a kid on the front, one on the back and one ...


12

Yes. But be careful of course, timewise, if you have a flight. Your best resource that I've found for this is Wikitravel's article on Fuji which has a Get in section. I was there in July but just wanted a view, not a climb, and was coming from Kanazawa on the west coast. We took trains down to Nagoya, and across, and then inland to Fujinomiya. It's ...


11

You can take the airport shuttle (Airport Limousine Bus) direct from Haneda (International Terminal) to Narita (Terminal 1 then Terminal 2) for 3,100 JPY. It comes fairly regularly (roughly hourly) and takes around 95 minutes. The earliest departure is 06:25. Alternatively you can take the train. The best route depends on time of arrival, but your main ...


11

The easy, safe and cheap option is train station lockers, which can be found at all major train stations in Tokyo (and Japan). Japanese lockers are usually narrow but deep, so while hard plastic suitcases will not fit into them, backpacks are generally not a problem. Some larger stations (eg. Tokyo stn) also have manned left luggage counters (手荷物預かり所 ...


10

No, Tokyo is not a disaster area during golden week. However, flights out of Tokyo may well be more expensive, crowded, or already sold out on the first weekend, and queues may be longer. Another factor is that on the national holidays, some (not all) stores will be closed down, as will be banks (and that includes ATMs in most cases). Possibly also some ...


10

This is a great question; I'm travelling to Japan next month and I'm tempted to add this to our itinerary. Codinghands did a great job of covering the basics. I read Japanese, so I can clarify some details. There is an English-language overview of the Metropolitan Area Outer Underground Discharge Channel tour on the official website. It has links to ...


10

It's possible to get there easily enough: Getting out of Narita: 1 hour Narita express to Tokyo station: 1:30 Shinkansen to Shin-fuji (Shizuoka) station: 1:30 So that's 4 hours travel time to get there, same back including the usual airport time. Leaving 7 hours for sightseeing. One thing about Fuji - it is frequently hidden in the clouds, especially ...


10

Hotel pricing in Japan is generally highly seasonal, and many hotels go so far as to publish a "room rate calendar" (客室料金カレンダー) that shows exactly how prices vary through the year. Disney has a nice, clear text-based one, but I'll use this rather more typical image from the Resonate chain in Kyushu to illustrate: To parse that, 月 means month (6月 = June, ...


10

Excuse my French, but that article's claims are bullshit: there are plenty of homeless in Tokyo. According to official statistics, there were over 6,000 homeless in Tokyo in 2004, and while the official figure has dropped since to ~1,600, that assessment is disputed: a large part of the drop is just because tents in visible places were banned. There are ...


9

A close alternative would be 'Yoyogi Park' which is just two stops south on the Yamanote line or you could even walk or run from Shinjuku. I walked around in Yoyogi and I am pretty sure I did not have to pay there. There are tons of other parks in Tokyo. I don't remember seeing any parks in Osaka, but that could just be me.


9

Can only answer question no 1 & 2 : Tokyo Metro is accessible for the disabled. Maps of World claims that "In the Tokyo Subway, there are special wheel chair access arrangements and ticket counters for the disabled passengers" Seems that not all stations support accessibility for disabled persons, even for major stations like Shibuya and ...


9

Here's a site with reviews of many amusement parks in Japan, that can probably give you more information than is possible here. The biggest one is probably Tokyo Disneyland. However, most amusements parks in Japan seem to be relatively small (at least the two I visited were) and cram lots of attractions into very little space - sometimes literally ...


9

For the visa part, the rules are (from Timaticweb): Visitors continuing their journey to a third country within 72 hours can obtain a Shore Pass/Transit Pass on arrival, provided: being able to prove to Japanese immigration that Shore/Transit Pass will be appropriately used; and departing from the same airport of arrival; or departing from ...


9

This page lists what lines the JR pass is valid for - it includes buses operated by JR, but that's not all of them, especially not in cities. More importantly, the JR pass is not valid for subway lines in any of the cities you mentioned. In Tokyo at least it can be used for some metropolitan JR lines, most importantly the Yamanote circle line. The rule of ...


9

There is a review here of Fukuro no Mise, which mentions an English set of instructions and an English speaker who works on Fridays. The review is from January 2015, so it's likely to be the same still. The shop's page (in Japanese) is here


9

I reckon that individual restaurant recommendations are not the best way to go in most cases, but telling you to have ramen in Tokyo without pointing you to the right places is like telling you to have texmex in the Bay Area without telling where to go: you may end up eating at Taco Bell and having a bad experience. The thing about ramen is that, besides ...



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